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Comment: Silicone? (Score 1) 193

by beernutz (#47707245) Attached to: C++14 Is Set In Stone

I think you mean Sillicon

silicone:
Any of a class of synthetic materials that are polymers with a chemical structure based on chains of alternate silicon and oxygen atoms, with organic groups attached to the silicon atoms. Such compounds are typically resistant to chemical attack and insensitive to temperature changes and are used to make rubber, plastics, polishes, and lubricants.

Comment: Save it to write once media too. (Score 1) 161

by beernutz (#44927475) Attached to: Link Rot and the US Supreme Court

I would also add that this should be done with a "write once" kind of storage back. This way we have some small assurance it was not modified.

You could go even further and keep a running log on the same medium that had an md5 of each previous content item which was then md5'd with the current.
This seems (to me at least) like it would provide a verifiable trail that shows the written contents were not tampered with.

Would this kind of scheme me useful? or am I missing something obvious?

Comment: Re:Linus management technique works (Score 1) 1501

by ichimunki (#44298721) Attached to: Kernel Dev Tells Linus Torvalds To Stop Using Abusive Language

I have a theory too: that you're a fucking moron. Because there is a mountain of evidence you're plainly too inept/stupid/monkey-fuck-dumb to realize is piled high on top of your thick head. For someone who wants to sound rational about the topic, you really should be ashamed to even think something so obviously wrong, let alone give voice to it.

To wit: Lots of us engage in abusive activity like this and we don't succeed with the type of behavior Linus exhibits here. Instead we're just abusive jerks who are frequently held accountable for our antisocial behavior and then go off to whine about how no one else does anything right and how if they just listened to us and blah blah blah. Then we see the masters of our craft with their own abusive tendencies as justification for what we have been doing. Because, after all, we're just cutting through the crap, avoiding the politics, and (get this) promoting our own cultural identity!

So is this behavior necessary for success? Does Steve Wozniak act like this? Yukihiro Matsumoto? Larry Wall? Tim Berners-Lee? Do Ken Thompson, Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie act like this? Bjarne Stroustrup? Anders Hjelsberg? Maybe I don't know these guys well enough... do they all act like this when we're not looking? Or are they able to do their thing without being abusive or demeaning to those with whom they are working?

Is it possible that we see plenty of success stories acting like this because it's just an all-too-common trait, rather than a defining characteristic of those who are successful?

Comment: Re:network ignorance (Score 1) 331

by ichimunki (#44138003) Attached to: U.S. Army Block Access To The Guardian's Website Over NSA Leaks
By accessing the material they might accidentally leak further information. If I want to know your IP address and I have your email address, all I do is send you an email with an image in it or some other "click here" net thing. I tag the image or link with a unique ID. As soon as you load the image or click the link I now have your IP address in my server's logs. Or maybe I post a links on my Facebook friends' walls -- again with the unique ID. I might learn a bit about their friends who click on the link. Maybe I seed the pages that the links go to with other types of enticing links, pretty soon I can see that all of so-and-so's friends clicked on the "anal sex" link but ignored the "help starving children" appeal. I might even get some of them to leave comments on articles that reveal even more information, like correcting "mistakes" in the linked article or revealing their own email address to "sign in to comment" or whatever. Before long I know enough to mount a successful social engineering attack on a group of interest to me, possibly netting even better access to more directly useful information.

"We are on the verge: Today our program proved Fermat's next-to-last theorem." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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