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Comment: Not Rendered? (Score 1) 162

by Spez (#33835842) Attached to: Spammers Using Soft Hyphen To Hide Malicious URLs

Alright I did some testing in Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Opera (all latest versions)

simple link, with a SHY character in the link. Depending on the format of the link (with a http, or without), All 4 browser did the exact thing we expected them to do : The link either showed the hyphen and linked to a hyphened page correctly (when I say "Showed", I mean, that if you mouse-over the link, you see the hyphen in the task bar) or just didn't show it and didn't link to a hyphened page.

So, I don't see the problem in here... i call this FUD.

Comment: In Quebec? (Score 0) 560

by Spez (#32669546) Attached to: 5.5 Earthquake Hits Canada; Felt in US Midwest, New England
The summary is completely misleading! The earthquake in "Quebec"? Do you mean Quebec city, 500+ km north-east of Ottawa? Or you mean "Quebec Province"? But that is pretty big (many times the size of France).

And why would you compare the position of a Province to a City??

That is just wrong. The epicenter was in Buckingham, 60km north of Ottawa.

Comment: Good for consumers though (Score 4, Insightful) 178

by Spez (#26493537) Attached to: Do Game Demos Have an Adverse Effect On Sales?
If we take the given fact that demos are there for the users to try the game before they buy it, to know if they like it enough to play a "full length" game, I think this is a good thing. And the only thing we can deduce from the fact that those game, if after the users played the demos, didn't want to buy them, well it meant that either they didn't like the game enough, they didn't feel like it was worth it, or the novelty of the game was over after the Demo.

In all the cases, the only thing the Demo did is to prevent the buyers from buying bad games or games they don't like. So it maybe hurt the game, but it was all for the benefit of the consumer.

On the other hand, if the game company want to try their hand at passing "bad" games for "good" games, so that the buyers buy bad stuff, they should stop the buyers from trying it before. If you want to sell a bottle of water as vodka to someone, don't let him taste it before!

Comment: Re:A little extreme there, don't you think? (Score 2, Insightful) 872

by Spez (#25948407) Attached to: Bittorrent To Cause Internet Meltdown
You're absolutely right.

And while we're at it, most thiefs enter houses using doors don't they? We probably should ban doors.

And people who do highway speeding or drug smugling use cars? Probably should ban cars also.

Do you want me to follow that line of thoughts? Because some people use some things illegaly doesn't make it right to ban the thing outright! That's not the same problem!

Comment: Allostop (Score 1) 541

by Spez (#25764143) Attached to: Online Carpooling Service Fined In Canada
The Ontario Transport company did the same thing some years ago to stop Allo-Stop to operate in Ontario.

Allo-stop is a wonderful system of carpooling where you call them when you are going from town to town. If you have a car, they will assign you people who don't have them. Money is paid, the guy with the car gets is Gaz paid, the passenger pay a lot less than with Bus Transport, everybody is happy.

I used it sooo much when I was a college student, it saved me hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in transport. Would have gladly used it to go to Ottawa many times, but hey, "unfair competetion" or something...

Worst Christmas Ever For Gadgets? 305

Posted by kdawson
from the please-santa dept.
An anonymous reader writes, "CNet says this will be the most disappointing Christmas ever for gadget-lovers. The Playstation 3 is delayed across most of the world, the Zune MP3 player is cancelled for everyone outside the US, Vista won't be out for home users before the big day, and even Final Fantasy XII won't reach Europe in time. From the article: 'It's enough to make you slit your wrists with the shards of a smashed Christmas tree bauble... Santa fails to deliver on almost all of his Yuletide promises. Most of the major technologies that were supposed to be ready for purchase have been delayed until next year.' The writer goes on to suggest phrases to use over Christmas dinner when the offending companies' products are mentioned. To reduce the pain of a Zune-less party, he suggests remarking: 'Imagine the stability and usability of Windows migrated to an MP3 player. In short, imagine a small portable version of Hell.'"

uTube.com Business Stalled by YouTube Purchase Hype 202

Posted by timothy
from the series-of-goo-filled-tubes dept.
prostoalex writes "Google's acquisition of online video sharing site YouTube.com resulted in massive traffic headed to uTube.com, "the number one supplier of used Tube & Pipe equipment in the world!", according to the site. CNN Money reports: "The company, which sells used machinery for making tubes to clients worldwide, has seen its site utube.com knocked off line by millions of online searchers looking for video site. "It's killing us," said Ralph Girkins, president and owner of the 22-year-old business. "All my worldwide reps use our Web site. Customers all over the world use it to bring up photos of the machinery, descriptions and specifications there."""

Apple Announces More Options Troubles 159

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the setting-the-record-straight dept.
fremen writes "Apple today announced that they will be withdrawing their financial reports back to September 29, 2002 and delaying the filing of future reports after finding more backdated options problems. Companies backdate their stock options by looking back over a period of time and choosing a historical low as the option strike price. While not illegal, this must be fully disclosed to investors and properly accounted. Expect more uncertainty in the coming weeks as regulators must now uncover how much of Apple's record profits were incorrect as well as whether or not Steve Jobs will be able to continue leading the company."

UK Gives Go-Ahead to Gary McKinnon Extradition 309

Posted by Zonk
from the normal-dition-not-enough dept.
robzster1977 writes "Judges in the UK have given the go-ahead to the extradition of UK hacker Gary McKinnon. McKinnon is accused of breaking into US Navy, Army and Department of Defense computers in 2001 and 2002." From the article: "On 4 July the secretary of state signed an order for Mr McKinnon's extradition to the United States for charges connected with computer hacking. Mr McKinnon had exercised his right to submit representations against return but the secretary of state did not consider the issues raised availed Mr McKinnon."

Mythic To Assist Ultima Online Team 28

Posted by Zonk
from the blast-from-the-past dept.
Gamasutra reports that Mythic will be assisting the UO team, now that they're both a part of the EA family. "The short website message indicates that the existing Ultima Online team will be working together with Mythic, best known for their work on the Dark Age of Camelot MMO, to 'forge Britannia's future.'" Fans of the venerable MMOG should be happiest, though, with speculation that the company will be assisting with a sequel or update to the world of Britannia.

Pirates Promise Improved Version of DaVinci Code 370

Posted by samzenpus
from the if-you-want-something-done-right dept.
Y'arr, Matey writes "CD Freaks is reporting that pirates are not happy with the quality of the DaVinci Code. According to the article, "A sales assistant at one Shanghai DVD shop said the initial copies were 'pirated overseas' and that 'better quality' versions would probably be available early next month.""

Group Testing Widescreen LCD Monitors 153

Posted by Zonk
from the tough-day-at-the-office dept.
An anonymous reader writes "If you're in the market for a new widescreen display, there's a group test of five models at the Bit-Tech site. The test focuses on real world gaming and DVD watching rather than artificial spec tests, and there's also discussion of design, ergonomics etc. An interesting read for those making the jump to wide." From the article: "Let's define the point of this test. We're going to make the assumption that you've got a half-decent graphics card, and you're looking for a new flat panel to connect to it. You want to watch movies on DVD and in hi-def (either as Apple trailers or via BitTorrent) and you want to play the latest games. The price range we're looking at is the £300-£400 range. Above that, you start to get into the territory of 24" screens from companies like Dell and Samsung. Below that, you're going into a range occupied mostly by 19" displays at 1280x1024."

First Steps Toward Artificial Gravity 470

Posted by samzenpus
from the stay-grounded dept.
CompaniaHill writes "Have scientists been able to artificially generate a gravitational field? Researchers at the European Space Agency believe so. "Small acceleration sensors placed at different locations close to the spinning superconductor, which has to be accelerated for the effect to be noticeable, recorded an acceleration field outside the superconductor that appears to be produced by gravitomagnetism. This experiment is the gravitational analogue of Faraday's electromagnetic induction experiment in 1831." The effect is very small, so don't expect to see it used in spacecraft any time soon. But the effect is still many times larger than the predictions of Einstein's theories. "If confirmed, this would be a major breakthrough," says [Austrian researcher Martin] Tajmar. "It opens up a new means of investigating general relativity and it consequences in the quantum world.""

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