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Comment: Re:Not all contributions / sacrifice are equivalen (Score 1) 121

by Sperbels (#47891827) Attached to: Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two
You're right, respect and canonization are different...I was just being smart ass. And maybe you're misunderstanding me. I don't disrespect people for joining the military. But I'm not going to give someone automatic respect for joining the army. I'll give them more respect for their deeds, but not for their intentions (at least not much more) because I know most kids join the military not because of an intention to die for their nation, but for their future careers or just to make a living after high school.

Comment: Re:Not all contributions / sacrifice are equivalen (Score 2) 121

by Sperbels (#47891035) Attached to: Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two
Well, I registered for the Selective Service when I turned 18. I agreed--up front--to go into harms way as needed. I also pledged allegiance to the country every day for years as a child in America's public schools. I think I meet your dubious criteria for canonization.

Comment: Re:Not all contributions / sacrifice are equivalen (Score 1) 121

by Sperbels (#47889909) Attached to: Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

Most people joining the military do so to "defend the US", just like all the TV commercials claim their job will be. Just like most police officers join the force to defend the public.

Bullshit. Most people join the military and/or become cops to earn money.

Regardless, intentions don't make you a hero, actions do. If a politician sends you into another country to support a coup to oust some leader who's hostile to American business interests...you're not a hero...you're a mercenary.

Comment: Re:Not all contributions / sacrifice are equivalen (Score 1) 121

by Sperbels (#47889821) Attached to: Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two
The point is still valid. You're arguing that because one puts himself in the position (by joining the military) where he can be easily forced to fight, that makes him a hero. That right there pretty much belittles those people who actually have participated in combat. No, I'm sorry...joining the military doesn't automatically give you a cape.

Comment: Re:Probably not. (Score 1) 546

by Sperbels (#47822039) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

Question should be rephrased: Does learning to code outweigh learning to code _better_?

A degree does not make one code better. Experience makes them code better. A degree and experience is even better (I'm not sure about this one because I've known experienced degree holders who still write awful code).

Comment: Re:No more fiction writing in the US (Score 1) 441

by Sperbels (#47809825) Attached to: In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist
In about 1991, I gave a presentation on how to build a pipe bomb to my speech class. Everyone laughed, and I didn't get in trouble. If I did that today.... hooo boy... they'd lock me up for months. In retrospect, it probably wasn't such a good idea (even before Columbine). But 17 year old me was clueless.

Comment: Re:alien planets (Score 1) 89

by Sperbels (#47787667) Attached to: Astronomers Find What May Be the Closest Exoplanet So Far
That still doesn't explain why they would think planets were uncommon. We didn't know of any extra solar planets because we didn't have instruments that could find them...and we knew they were inadequate. Just because we were incapable of seeing them, that's no reason to believe they were uncommon. What we can infer from the known laws of physics suggests that all you need is gravity and matter and you're going to get clumps of matter orbiting other clumps matter orbiting other clumps of matter until you get stars and planets and moons and galaxies.

There can be no twisted thought without a twisted molecule. -- R. W. Gerard

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