Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Businesses

+ - Is age 40 too old for IT or Software Development?

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "I have read some stuff on Dice.com's message boards where some people are claiming that after age 40 or so that jobs become very scarce in the IT profession. I was wondering how prevalent this really is, and in particular I was wondering how hard it would be to actually start a career in IT or Software Development at age 40.

I recently finished up a degree in physics, and I have done a little basic IT support as well as some programming as part of my job working in an environmental testing lab. How difficult would it be to start a computer career at age 40, and what industries and fields will have the most problem with my age and which will have the least problem with my age?"
Businesses

+ - IT Hiring - Too Dependent on Recruiters?

Submitted by
thiotim
thiotim writes "I'm a senior developer, in the field for 15 years. Although I still love the work, I hate the hiring process. The job boards are swamped by anonymous, generic recruiter postings. You can't tell what company is actually hiring and all the posts are pretty much just a checklist of skills. They are cog-in-the-wheel ads, leaving you no way to distinguish between places you would love to work at and those that you would just tolerate. There are niche boards with direct postings, but they are scattered and don't have enough postings to be useful for an active job seeker. It's a problem for both job-seeker and employer:
  • The job-searcher can't pre-screen. You have to answer a generic ad to find out if the real job is even acceptable — almost impossible to find your dream job.
  • The employer doesn't get responders with specific interest in their company, product, or work environment. How could they?
  • The ads foster an attitude that whether someone is smart, quick, or interested doesn't matter — all that counts is XXX years experience with YYY.
I recently tried to help by launching a free principals-only job board (nameless — this is not a slashvertisement). I'd expected a groundswell of grassroots support for such a venue, but it's turning out to be more difficult than I expected. I don't know if it is because there simply aren't enough people interested, or because I can't get the word out.
  • Is this an issue that you care about? Do you think it is a serious problem in the industry?
  • Do you think that a centralized, principals-only job board is a valid solution? If so, how would you go about promoting it? The typical venues have their hand in the IT hiring pie and view it as an unwanted competitor. Bloggers have niche boards, craigslist has a board (but it's being swamped), user groups have job boards (mostly recruiter ads), newsgroups seem to be pretty much dead, and google ads cost too much over the long haul. If you don't already have a highly-trafficked blog to promote it... what would you do?
"

Comment: Re:How long can Apple keep their business model? (Score 1) 672

by SpasticThinker (#14008396) Attached to: Mac OS X x86 Put To The Test
The biggest issue is this is: would the quality remain the same if Apple released its OS X for general x86 use? I think the answer is no, and I'll tell you why.

The biggest thing windows has against it now is the multitude of hardware it must support. Any average joe company can build a horrible piece of hardware for a pc and code crap drivers for it. An end user may not even realize that the horrible english translation on the box and rock bottom price means to be cautious. They install it, and BAM...windows sucks.

If the mac had to support the same myriad hardware that windows does, I'm willing to wager that while it may not be AS bad, it would be a far cry from the stable OS we know it as today. Hardware controls and great software integration MAKE the OS X experience.

Some people carve careers, others chisel them.

Working...