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Submission + - In new study, HIV prevention pill Truvada is 100% effective.->

An anonymous reader writes: A study published in the journal Clinincal Infectious Diseases details the trial of a drug named Truvada, which researchers think might excel at preventing HIV infections. They scientists administered the drug to 657 high-risk individuals, including users of injected drugs. At the end of the study, every single subject was still free of the virus. This is encouraging news in the fight against AIDS, though it shouldn't be taken to mean the drug is perfectly effective. Since researchers can't ethically expose people to HIV, we don't know for sure that any of the subjects were definitely saved by the drug. Other studies have had to be stopped because it was clear that subjects who were on a placebo were suffering from noticeably higher rates of infection. Leaders in the fight against AIDS say this new study closes a "critical gap" in existing research by demonstrating that Truvada can work in real-world health programs.
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Submission + - The Only State Where Everyone Gets Free Money->

citadrianne writes: “The Alaska dividend is pretty much the closest thing the world has to a universal basic income anywhere,” Scott Santens, who is perhaps the web’s most active basic income advocate, told me. Not only that, he says, but a basic income could help citizens fight the impacts of climate change. President Obama’s recent trip to Alaska was focused on highlighting the calamity that human-induced warming is bringing to the region; perhaps we should be paying attention as well to a policy, found only here, that may help keep society stable and more equal in the face of a warmer, job-scarce future. ...

This year, the payment to every man, woman, and child (yes, children get the payment too, though it is entrusted to their guardians) is expected to surpass $2,000. The Fund, in other words, is huge.

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Submission + - Uber Ride Data Publicly Accessible Through Google->

itwbennett writes: On Thursday, ZDNet reported that Uber ride data had leaked into Google search results. And Zach Minors confirmed in an ITworld article that a 'site-specific Google search for trip.uber.com produced dozens of links to Uber rides that have been completed and cancelled, in countries around the world including the U.S., England, Russia, France and Mexico. Each link leads to a Web site with a map showing the ride's route, with the pickup and destination tagged with markers. A card on the page also shows the first name of the rider and driver, along the driver's photo, make and model of the car, and license plate number.' But, what was on the surface a privacy red flag was not a 'data leak,' according to an Uber spokeswoman: 'We have found that all these links have been deliberately shared publicly by riders. Protection of user data is critically important to us and we are always looking for ways to make it even more secure.'
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Submission + - 24 Chinese Android Smartphones Models Come With Pre-Installed Malware 1

Submission + - Solar Windows Could Change The Way Buildings Are Powered->

Lucas123 writes: Several companies are now beginning to roll out translucent photovoltaic films or solar cells embedded in windows that can supplement a significant amount of energy in the buildings where they're used. SolarWindow Technolgies, for example, is preparing to launch a transparent product made with organic PVs, while another company, Solaria, is cutting solar cells into thin strips and embedding them in windows. Both companies admit their products can't produce the 20% efficiency ratings of today's best rooftop solar panels, but they say that's not their objective. Instead, the companies are looking to take advantage of millions of skyscraper windows that today are simply unused real estate for renewable energy. One company is aiming at supplementing 20% to 30% of a skyscrapers power requirements. Meanwhile, universities are also jumping into the solar window arena. Oxford University has spun off a PV window company that produces semi-transparent solar cells made of semi-transparent perovskite oxide that has achieved a 20% solar energy efficiency.
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Submission + - $415 Million Settlement Approved In Tech Working Poaching Case->

An anonymous reader writes: Adobe, Apple, Google, and Intel have been embroiled in a high-profile court case accusing them of creating anti-poaching agreements in an attempt to keep tech industry salaries under control. Now, Judge Lucy Koh has ruled that the $415 million settlement against the tech giants is far, and will stand. Koh also cut in half the amount awarded to the attorneys in the case. The lawsuit was a class-action originally joined by about 64,000 workers. Other companies were involved with the case, and reached settlements earlier, and a few members of the class action may opt out of any settlement. But the remaining members will only get something in the vicinity of $6,000 apiece for the damage done to their earnings.
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Submission + - Science Teacher Arrested After Crashing Drone at US Open->

An anonymous reader writes: We all had that science teacher growing up — the one who took his classroom experiments a little too far. The one with the potato cannon. The one who made you wonder how he didn't get into trouble in his spare time. Well, it's finally happened for one science teacher from New York City. The 26-year-old man was arrested last night after he crashed a drone into some empty seats at the U.S. Open. He was charged with reckless endangerment, reckless operation of a drone and operating a drone in a New York City public park outside of prescribed area for doing so. Nobody was injured, but the drone did fly through the arena while a pair of tennis players were in the middle of a match. The game was briefly interrupted when the drone crashed.
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Submission + - Cheap Smartphones Quietly Becoming Popular In the US->

An anonymous reader writes: Bloomberg reports that ZTE and its cheap Android smartphones have been grabbing more and more of the market in the U.S. It's not that the phone are particularly good — it's that they're "good enough" for the $60 price tag. The company is fourth among smartphone makers, behind Apple, Samsung and LG. That puts them ahead of a lot of companies making premium devices: HTC, Huawei, Motorola, and BlackBerry, to name a few. ZTE, a Chinese manufacturer, seems to be better at playing the U.S. markets than competitors like Xiaomi, and they're getting access to big carriers and big retailers. "Its phone sales are all the more surprising because it’s been frozen out of the more lucrative telecom networking market since 2012. That year, the House Intelligence Committee issued a report warning that China’s intelligence services could potentially use ZTE’s equipment, and those of rival Huawei Technologies, for spying. Huawei then dismissed the allegations as 'little more than an exercise in China bashing.'"
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Submission + - MIT Simplifies Design Process For 3D Printing->

An anonymous reader writes: New software out of MIT and the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel takes CAD files and automatically builds visual models that users can alter with simple, visual sliders. It works by computing design variations before a user ask for them. When the CAD file is loaded, the software runs through a host of size variations to various aspects of the object, evaluating whether the changes would work in a 3D printer, and doing the necessary math to plan tool routes. When a user moves a slider, it switches the design along these pre-computer values. "The system automatically weeds out all the parameter values that lead to unprintable or unstable designs, so the sliders are restricted to valid designs. Moving one of the sliders — changing the height of the shoe’s heel, say, or the width of the mug’s base — sweeps through visual depictions of the associated geometries."There are two big drawbacks: first, it requires a lot of up-front processing power to compute the variations on an object. Second, resolution for changes is fixed if you want quick results — changing the design for a pair of 3D-printed shoes from size 8 to size 9 might be instantaneous, but asking for a shoe that's a quarter of a millimeter longer than a size 8 would take several minutes to process. But for scrolling through the pre-computed design changes, the software can present "in real time what would take hours to calculate with a CAD program," and without the requisite experience with CAD.
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Submission + - ThinkGeek Opens First Physical Store in Orlando->

Enderxeno writes: Online collectibles dealer ThinkGeek is opening a brick-and-mortar concept store at Florida Mall with the help of video game giant GameStop. On the cusp of a huge merchandising push with the new Star Wars movie coming out in December, Think Geek will open the store focused entirely on collectibles on Sept. 25, with pop culture brands such as Game of Thrones, Marvel and Minecraft. The store will also sell apparel.
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Submission + - Is this software's industrial revolution?

An anonymous reader writes: Tech company, Code Valley, makes a bold claim that a software industrial revolution may be imminent. They propose to shift developers from the code-domain (current software development practice) to a 'design-domain,' where the emphasis is no longer on writing code, but is on decentralised design – code becomes simply a by-product of this collaboration. In this design-domain, software programs are designed (and built) by a peer-to-peer supply-chain of software vendors, each owned and managed by a software engineer. Code Valley claims that their technology allows each vendor to operate with complete physical IP-protection. They envisage a global supply-chain of these software experts, fuelled by bitcoin, capable of reliably delivering immensely complex software programs – a “design-domain of limitless potential, software’s industrial revolution.”

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Storing family videos and pictures for posterity? 2

jalvarez13 writes: I'm in my early 40's and I will become a dad in less than a month. Until now I've been quite happy with a Canon Powershot S110 for taking pictures and video, but now I'm thinking in longer terms. If some of you have already thought or done something about this, what did you consider when buying photo/video equipment? I guess there are important decisions you made about to image quality, file formats, storage type, organising and labelling software, etc.

I'm also wondering if there are any other technologies (stereoscopic cameras?) that I haven't thought about and may be interesting to look at.

Submission + - Easy-To-Clean Membrane Separates Oil From Water->

ckwu writes: A steel mesh with a novel self-cleaning coating can separate oil and water, easily lifting oil from an oil-water mixture and leaving the water behind. Unlike existing oil-water separation membranes, if the coated mesh gets contaminated with oil, it can be simply rinsed off with water and reused, without needing to be cleaned with detergents. The team was able to use the mesh to lift crude oil from a crude oil-seawater mixture, showcasing the feasibility of oil-spill cleanup. The membrane could also be used to treat oily wastewater and as a protective barrier in industrial sewer outlets to avoid oil discharge.
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Submission + - Teenage boy placed on police register after 'sexting' naked Snapchat ->

Ewan Palmer writes: A teenage boy has had a crime of making and distributing indecent images recorded against him after he sent a naked picture of himself to one of his female classmates. The 14-year-old was not formally arrested after he sent the explicit image to girl of the same age via Snapchat.

The police file against the boy will now remain active for 10 years, meaning any future employer conducting an advanced Criminal Records Bureau check will be aware of the incident.

However, it is not clear whether a police file was recorded for the girl who saved and shared the image. Under new legislation, if she had been over 18, the girl could have been convicted under the so called "revenge porn" law in the UK.

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We declare the names of all variables and functions. Yet the Tao has no type specifier.

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