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Submission + - bring your own device nightmare 1

HongoBelando writes: The company I contract for is pushing on to me a new "bring your own device" policy. It would not be bad if the mandatory requirements IMHO are braindamaged and push to a complete Windows environment. Windows 7 or 8 64bit, Pointesec or Bitlocker, Symantec or other similar stuff. IOS and Linux are not permitted, xBSD are not even mentioned. Some lines even mention TPM (yuck).

Until now I could happily use my dual boot Debian and FreeBSD that suites my job perfectly.

My only idea at the moment is to try installing a VirtualBox W7 client and hope one of the permitted disk encrypters works. I really would want to avoid repartitioning just to meet idiotic requirements of some bean counter. All ideas appreciated!

Submission + - Facebook to Position Internet Beaming Satellite Over Africa Next Year (

Zothecula writes: Facebook is set to take its worldwide internet project to new heights, all the way to geostationary orbit, to be specific. The social media giant has announced a new partnership with French firm Eutelsat, with plans to launch a satellite into space next year in hope of bringing millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa online.

Submission + - ESR On Why The FCC Shouldn't Lock Down Device Firmware (

An anonymous reader writes: We've discussed some proposed FCC rules that could restrict modification of wireless routers in such a way that open source firmware would become banned. Eric S. Raymond has published the comment he sent to the FCC. He argues, "The present state of router and wireless-access-point firmware is nothing short of a disaster with grave national-security implications. ... The effect of locking down router and WiFi firmware as these rules contemplate would be to lock irreparably in place the bugs and security vulnerabilities we now have. To those like myself who know or can guess the true extent of those vulnerabilities, this is a terrifying possibility. I believe there is only one way to avoid a debacle: mandated device upgradeability and mandated open-source licensing for device firmware so that the security and reliability problems can be swarmed over by all the volunteer hands we can recruit. This is an approach proven to work by the Internet ubiquity and high reliability of the Linux operating system."

Submission + - Enlightenment Mysteriously Drops Wayland Support

jones_supa writes: According to the release notes, Enlightenment 0.19.12 is an important release that fixes over 40 issues, which is quite something, considering the fact that the previous versions had only a few improvements, with most of them being minor. However, the big news is that 0.19.12 drops support for the Wayland display server. Unfortunately, the Enlightenment developers have omitted to mention why they decided to remove any form of support for Wayland from this release, and if it will return in upcoming releases of the software.

Submission + - Pen-Testing Drone Searches For Unsecured Devices

An anonymous reader writes: You're sitting in an office, and you send a print job to the main office printer. You see or hear a drone flying outside your window. Next thing you know, the printer buzzes to life and, after spitting out your print job, it continues to work and presents you with more filled pages than you expected. They contain instructions on how to encrypt the printer’s wireless access, so that malicious attackers can't intercept print jobs and glean potentially sensitive business information from them. The approach has been thought out by a group of researchers from from iTrust, a Center for Research in Cyber Security at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, who equipped a flying drone with an Android smartphone, and the latter with a special app dubbed “Cybersecurity Patrol".

Submission + - IP address associates Lyft CTO with Uber data breach (

An anonymous reader writes: According to two unnamed Reuters sources the IP address of Lyft CTO Chris Lambert has been revealed by Uber's investigations to be associated with the accessing of a security key that was accidentally deposited on GitHub in 2014 and used to access 50,000 database records of Uber drivers later that year. However, bearing in mind that the breach was carried out through a fiercely protectionist Scandinavian VPN, and that Lambert was a Google software engineer before become CTO of a major technology company, it does seem surprising that he would have accessed such sensitive data with his own domestic IP address.

Jimmy Wales and Former NSA Chief Ridicule Government Plans To Ban Encryption 174

Mickeycaskill writes: Jimmy Wales has said government leaders are "too late" to ban encryption which authorities say is thwarting attempts to protect the public from terrorism and other threats. The Wikipedia founder said any attempt would be "a moronic, very stupid thing to do" and predicted all major web traffic would be encrypted soon. Wikipedia itself has moved towards SSL encryption so all of its users' browsing habits cannot be spied on by intelligence agencies or governments. Indeed, he said the efforts by the likes of the NSA and GCHQ to spy on individuals have actually made it harder to implement mass-surveillance programs because of the public backlash against Edward Snowden's revelations and increased awareness of privacy. Wales also reiterated that his site would never co-operate with the Chinese government on the censorship of Wikipedia. "We've taken a strong stand that access to knowledge is a principle human right," he said. derekmead writes with news that Michael Hayden, the former head of the CIA and the NSA, thinks the US government should stop railing against encryption and should support strong crypto rather than asking for backdoors. The US is "better served by stronger encryption, rather than baking in weaker encryption," he said during a panel on Tuesday.

Submission + - The First Privately Funded Lunar Mission Set a Launch Date for 2017

merbs writes: If all goes according to plan, the world’s first private lunar mission will be launched just two years from now. SpaceIL, an Israeli nonprofit, has secured a launch contract with California-based Spaceflight Industries, and will aim to land a rover on the moon in the second half of 2017. It’s the first such launch contract to be verified by the $30 million Google Lunar XPrize competition.

Submission + - Endocannabinoids Contribute to Runner's High (

MTorrice writes: After a nice long bout of aerobic exercise, some people experience what’s known as a “runner’s high”: a feeling of euphoria coupled with reduced anxiety and a lessened ability to feel pain. For decades, scientists have associated this phenomenon with an increased level in the blood of -endorphins, opioid peptides thought to elevate mood.

Now, German researchers have shown the brain’s endocannabinoid system—the same one affected by marijuana’s 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—may also play a role in producing runner’s high, at least in mice.

Submission + - Nissan Creates The Ultimate Distracted Driving Machine (

jfruh writes: More and more research is suggesting that it isn't safe to text or even talk on our phones hands-free while driving, but one brave car company is pushing full-speed in the other direction. Nissan has created a concept car in which every surface, including the entire dashboard and even the seats, is a display device. The car is the result of "extensive" surveys with the younger generation that came to the conclusion that, according to Nissan, young people "feel that time spent in a car should be time for connecting and sharing experiences with friends."

Submission + - B612 foundation loses partnership with NASA; asteroids not a significant risk

StartsWithABang writes: Yes, asteroids might be humanity's undoing in the worst-case scenario. It's how the dinosaurs went down, and it could happen to us, too. The B612 foundation has been working to protect us by mapping and then learning to deflect potential threats to our planet, but their proposed mission needed $450 million, a goal they've fallen well short of. As a result, NASA has severed their partnership, which is a good thing for humanity: the risk assessment figures show that worrying about killer asteroids is largely a waste.

Submission + - SPAM: Pool suppliers Gold Coast

An anonymous reader writes: Contact the top pool suppliers Gold Coast as they would help you get your very own fibre glass swimming pools in Gold Coast without any hassles. They offer you their professional services at low prices.
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Submission + - The physics behind the Volkswagen diesel scandal (

Guinnessy writes: Volkswagen recently admitted that it equipped diesel cars with "defeat devices" that belch 40 times the EPA standard on nitrogen oxides. Yet despite the mass of coverage, details on exactly how the devices cheated on emissions tests, and why diesels expel such gases have been sketchy. Physics Today's Charles Day takes a look ( ) at how diesel engines work, and why its clear its not just a lone software engineer who came up with the cheat. " is impotent without hardware. To recognize when a car was being tested and not driven, the defeat device required data from a range of sensors—sensors that a noncheating car might not need.... Whereas it's conceivable that a single software engineer, directed by a single manager, could have secretly written and uploaded the code that ran the defeat device, installing its associated hardware would require a larger and more diverse team of conspirators," he says.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Is the gap between data access speeds widening or narrowing?

DidgetMaster writes: Everyone knows that CPU registers are much faster than level1, level2, and level3 caches. Likewise, those caches are much faster than RAM; and RAM in turn is much faster than disk (even SSD). But the past 30 years have seen tremendous improvements in data access speeds at all these levels. RAM today is much, much faster than RAM 10, 20, or 30 years ago. Disk accesses are also tremendously faster than previously as steady improvements in hard drive technology and the even more impressive gains in flash memory have occurred. Is the "gap" between the fastest RAM and the fastest disks bigger or smaller now than the gap was 10 or 20 years ago? Are the gaps between all the various levels getting bigger or smaller? Anyone know of a definitive source that tracks these gaps over time?

"From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere." -- Dr. Seuss