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+ - Airbnb Partners With Cities For Disaster Preparedness->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Every time a city- or state-wide disaster strikes, services to help the victims slowly crop up over the following days and weeks. Sometimes they work well, sometimes they don't. Today, city officials in San Francisco and Portland announced a partnership with peer-to-peer lodging service Airbnb to work out some disaster-preparedness plans ahead of time. Airbnb will locate hosts in these cities who will commit to providing a place to stay for people who are displaced in a disaster, and then set up alerts and notifications to help people find these hosts during a crisis. The idea is that if, say, an earthquake or wildfires for thousands of people to evacuate their homes, they can easily be absorbed into an organized group of willing hosts, rather than being shunted to one area and forced to live in a school gymnasium or similar."
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+ - Hackers Plundered Israeli Defense Firms that Built 'Iron Dome' Missile Defense ->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Krebs gets information from Columbia, Md.-based threat intelligence firm Cyber Engineering Services Inc. that attackers thought to be operating out of China hacked into the corporate networks of three top Israeli defense technology companies. This happened in 2011-12."
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+ - Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' CD-R Ability To Rip Music To Hard Drive->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "The Alliance of Artists and Recording Companies is suing Ford and General Motors for millions of dollars over alleged copyrights infringement violations because their vehicles' CD-Rs can rip music to infotainment center hard drives. The AARC claims in its filing that the CD-R's ability to copy music violates the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992. The Act protects against distributing digital audio recording devices whose primary purpose is to rip copyrighted material. For example, Ford's owner's manual explains, "Your mobile media navigation system has a Jukebox which allows you to save desired tracks or CDs to the hard drive for later access. The hard drive can store up to 10GB (164 hours; approximately 2,472 tracks) of music." The AARC wants $2,500 for each digital audio recording device installed in a vehicle, the amount it says should have been paid in royalties."
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+ - University of Michigan solar car wins fifth straight national title->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "For the fifth consecutive year, the solar car team from the University of Michigan has won the American Solar Car Challenge. The event is an eight-day, 1,700-mile race with a total of 23 participating teams. The Umich victory comes in spite of a 20-30 minute delay when they had problems with the motor at the very beginning of the race. "They made the time up when team strategists decided to push the car to the speed limit while the sun was shining bright, rather than hold back to conserve energy." Footage of the race and daily updates on the car's performance are available from the team's website, as are the specs of the car itself. Notably, the current iteration of the car weighs only 320 pounds, a full 200 pounds lighter than the previous version."
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+ - EA Test Subscription Access To Game Catalog->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Electronic Arts has announced a new program called "EA Access," a subscription-based service that will grant Xbox One users access to a small catalog of EA's popular games, as well as an early trial of upcoming games. They're beta testing the service now, and the available games are FIFA 14, Madden NFL 25, Peggle 2, and Battlefield 4. (More titles will be added later.) They're charging $5 per month or $30 per year. It probably won't ever include their newest releases, but it's interesting to see such a major publisher experimenting with a Netflix-style subscription service."
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+ - Which is better, Adblock or Adblock Plus?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Wladimir Palant is the creator of the Adblock Plus browser extension, but he often gets asked how it compares to a similar extension for Chrome called Adblock. In the past, he's told people that they're achieve largely the same end in slightly different ways, but recent changes to the Adblock project have him worried. "AdBlock covertly moved from an open development model towards hiding changes from its users. Users were neither informed about that decision nor the reasons behind it." He goes through the changelog and highlights some changes that call into question the integrity of Adblock. For example, from an update on June 6th: "Calling home functionality has been extended. It now sends user’s locale in addition to the unique user ID, AdBlock version, operating system and whether Google Search ads are being allowed. Also, AdBlock will tell getadblock.com (or any other website if asked nicely) whether AdBlock has just been installed or has been used for a while — again, in addition to the unique user ID." Of course, Palant has skin in this game, and Adblock Plus has dealt with fallout from their "acceptable ads policy," but at least it's still developed in the open."
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+ - Nuclear Mission Command Drops Grades From Tests To Discourage Cheating-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Earlier this year, just over half of the military officers put in charge of nuclear launch facilities were implicated in an exam cheating scandal. The U.S. Air Force conducted regular exams to keep officers current on the protocols and skills required to operate some of the world's most dangerous weapons. But they way they graded the test caused problems. Anything below a 90% score was a fail, but the remaining 10% often dictated how a launch officer's career progressed. There might not be much functional difference between a 92% and a 95%, but the person scoring higher will get promoted disproportionately quicker. This inspired a ring of officers to cheat in order to meet the unrealistic expectations of the Air Force. Now, in an effort to clean up that Missile Wing, the Air Force is making the exams pass/fail. The officers still need to score 90% or higher (since it's important work with severe consequences for failure), but scores won't be recorded and used to compete for promotions anymore. The Air Force is also making an effort to replace or refurbish the aging equipment that runs these facilities."
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+ - Saturn Moon's 101 Geysers Blast From Hidden Ocean->

Submitted by astroengine
astroengine (1577233) writes "New observations from NASA’s Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft have revealed at least 101 individual geysers erupting from Enceladus’ crust and, through careful analysis, planetary scientists have uncovered their origin. From the cracked ice in this region, fissures blast out water vapor mixed with organic compounds as huge geysers. Associated with these geysers are surface “hotspots” but until now there has been some ambiguity as to whether the hotspots are creating the geysers or whether the geysers are creating the hotspots. “Once we had these results in hand, we knew right away heat was not causing the geysers, but vice versa,” said Carolyn Porco, leader of the Cassini imaging team from the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo., and lead author of one of the research papers. “It also told us the geysers are not a near-surface phenomenon, but have much deeper roots.” And those roots point to a large subsurface source of liquid water — adding Enceladus as one of the few tantalizing destinations for future astrobiology missions."
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+ - 5 Programming Languages You'll Need Next Year (and Beyond)->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Over at Dice, there's a breakdown of the programming languages that could prove most popular over the next year or two, including Apple's Swift, JavaScript, CSS3, and PHP. But perhaps the most interesting entry on the list is Erlang, an older language that was invented in 1986 by engineers at Erricson. It was originally intended to be used specifically for telecommunications needs, but has since evolved into a general-purpose language, and found a home in cloud-based, high-performance computing when concurrency is needed. "There aren’t a lot of Erlang jobs out there," writes developer Jeff Cogswell. "However, if you do master it (and I mean master it, not just learn a bit about it), then you’ll probably land a really good job. That’s the trade-off: You’ll have to devote a lot of energy into it. But if you do, the payoffs could be high." And while the rest of the featured languages are no-brainers with regard to popularity, it's an open question how long it might take Swift to become popular, given how hard Apple will push it as the language for developing on iOS."
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+ - Senate Bill Would Ban Most Bulk Surveillance->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Today Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced a bill that would ban bulk collection of telephone records and internet data for U.S. citizens. This is a stronger version of the legislation that passed the U.S. House in May, and it has support from the executive branch as well. "The bill, called the USA Freedom Act, would prohibit the government from collecting all information from a particular service provider or a broad geographic area, such as a city or area code, according to a release from Leahy's office. It would expand government and company reporting to the public and reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which reviews NSA intelligence activities. Both House and Senate measures would keep information out of NSA computers, but the Senate bill would impose stricter limits on how much data the spy agency could seek.""
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+ - Tesla And Panasonic Have Reached An Agreement On The Gigafactory

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Tesla's been pretty quiet regarding its upcoming gigafactory lately, but that's about to change. It seems the Silicon Valley startup has reached an agreement with Panasonic in regards to the gigafactory, and Panasonic's going to end up having skin in the game. While the electronics giant was originally skeptical of Tesla's battery factory, it now isn't just on board, it's actually going to participate in the construction of this new facility. It's reported that Panasonic will invest 20 billion to 30 billion yen (194 million to $291 million at current exchange rates), and supply fabrication machinery necessary for cell production. That means Pansonic could end up footing the bill for $1 billion of the total $5 billion anticipated investment required for the gigafactory to get off the ground. If things continue to move forward the Gigafactory should be online by the end of 2017."

+ - 3-D Printing Comes to Amazon

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Promising "an appstore for the physical world," Amazon's just unveiled their new online market for products created using a 3-D Printer. "Customization gives customers the power to remix their world," explains the co-founder of Mixee Labs (an Amazon partner), "and we want to change the way people shop online." Amazon's ability to sell you things before they've even been built is currently limited mostly to novelties like iPhone cases, jewelry, and bobbleheads that look like you. But as one web page explains, you're also buying a chance to experience the beginning of mainstream 3D printing."

+ - Critical Android FakeID Bug Allows Apps to Impersonate Trusted Apps

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "There is a critical vulnerability in millions of Android devices that allows a malicious app to impersonate a trusted application in a transparent way, enabling an attacker to take a number of actions, including inserting malicious code into a legitimate app or even take complete control of an affected device.

The vulnerability is a result of the way that Android handles certificate validation and it’s present in all versions of Android from 2.1 to 4.4, known as Kit Kat. Researchers at Bluebox Security, who identified the vulnerability, said that in some cases, attackers can exploit the vulnerability to gain full access to a target device. Specifically, devices that run the 3LM administration extension are at risk for a complete compromise. This includes devices from HTC, Pantech, Sharp, Sony Ericsson, and Motorola.

Android apps are signed using digital certificates that establish the identity of the developer and the vulnerability Bluebox discovered is that the Android app installer doesn’t try to authenticate the certificate chain of a given app. That means an attacker can create an app with a fake identity and impersonate an app with extensive privileges, such as an Adobe plug-in or Google Wallet. In the case of the Adobe impersonation, the malicious app would have the ability to escape the sandbox and run malicious code inside another app, the researchers said.

“You could use any app distribution mechanism, whether it’s a link in SMS or a legitimate app store. Look at other Android malware. You do it whatever it takes for the user to say, Yeah I want that app,” Bluebox CTO Jeff Forristal said. “It’s certainly severe. It’s completely stealth and transparent to the user and it’s absolutely the stuff that malware is made of. It operates extremely consistently, so in that regard it’s going to be extremely attractive to malware.”"

I'm all for computer dating, but I wouldn't want one to marry my sister.

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