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+ - Amazon launches one-hour delivery service in Baltimore and Miami->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 writes: Amazon.com announced the launch Thursday of its one-hour delivery service, Prime Now, in select zip codes in Baltimore and Miami. It initially launched in Manhattan in December.

The one-hour service, available to Amazon Prime subscribers through the Prime Now mobile app, costs $7.99. Two-hour delivery is free.

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:so (Score 1) 136

by SoulMan007 (#49293653) Attached to: The Pirate Party Now the Biggest Party In Iceland

The page you read up upon doesn't talk specifically about the Icelandic Pirate Party. There is very little connection between the Pirate Party in different nations and that Wikipedia page is an outstanding example to why you shouldn't use Wikipedia as an example.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P... Not that it takes too long to find the appropriate page, though it's actual information is fairly thin, and apparently they have only been around since the end of 2012.

+ - First AMD FreeSync Capable Gaming Displays And Drivers Launched, Tested->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid writes: Soon after NVIDIA unveiled its G-SYNC technology, AMD announced that it would pursue an open standard, dubbed FreeSync, leveraging technologies already available in the DisplayPort specification to offer adaptive refresh rates to users of some discrete Radeon GPUs and AMD APUs. AMD's goal with FreeSync was to introduce a technology that offered similar end-user benefits to NVIDIA's G-SYNC, that didn't require monitor manufacturers to employ any proprietary add-ons, and that could be adopted by any GPU maker. Today, AMD released its first FreeSync capable set of drivers and this first look at the sleek ultra-widescreen LG 34UM67 showcases some of the benefits, based on an IPS panel with a native resolution of 2560x1080 and a max refresh rate of 75Hz. To fully appreciate how adaptive refresh rate technologies work, it's best to experience them in person. In short, the GPU scans a frame out to the monitor where it's drawn on-screen and the monitor doesn't update until a frame is done drawing. As soon as a frame is done, the monitor will update again as quickly as it can with the next frame, in lockstep with the GPU. This completely eliminates tearing and jitter issues that are common in PC gaming. Technologies like NVIDIA G-SYNC and AMD FreeSync aren't a panacea for all of PC gaming anomalies, but they do ultimately enhance the experience and are worthwhile upgrades in image quality and less eye strain.
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+ - No fuel in the Fukushima1 reactor #1->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: To nobody's surprise, the Japanese press reports that a new way to look at the inside of one of the Fukushima 1 damaged reactors has shown the fuel is not in place.

Engineers have not been able to develop a machine to directly see the exact location of the molten fuel, hampered by extremely high levels of radiation in and around the reactors, but a new scan technique using muons (details on the method in the media are missing) have shown the fuel is not in its place.

While Tepco's speculation is that the fuel may be at the bottom of the reactor, it is a safe bet that at least some of it has burned through and has gone on to create an Uruguay syndrom.

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+ - Google: Our new system for recognizing faces is the best->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 writes: Last week, a trio of Google researchers published a paper on a new artificial intelligence system dubbed FaceNet that it claims represents the most-accurate approach yet to recognizing human faces. FaceNet achieved nearly 100-percent accuracy on a popular facial-recognition dataset called Labeled Faces in the Wild, which includes more than 13,000 pictures of faces from across the web. Trained on a massive 260-million-image dataset, FaceNet performed with better than 86 percent accuracy.

The approach Google’s researchers took goes beyond simply verifying whether two faces are the same. Its system can also put a name to a face—classic facial recognition—and even present collections of faces that look the most similar or the most distinct.

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+ - OpenSSL security update less critical than expected, still recommended

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: As announced on Monday, the OpenSSL project team has released new versions of the cryptographic library that fix a number of security issues. The announcement created a panic within the security community, who were dreading the discovery of another Heartbleed-type bug, but as it turns out, the high severity issue fixed is a bug than can be exploited in a DoS attack against servers. Other issues fixed are mostly memory corruption and DoS flaws of moderate and low severity.

+ - SPAM: Microsoft dropped an interesting piece of information today!!

Submitted by douglas1986
douglas1986 writes: amid its confirmation that Windows 10 will go on sale this summer.

Near the end of its announcement, the Redmond-based company casually revealed that it is testing Windows 10 with “power users” of Xiaomi’s flagship Mi 4 Android smartphone. The initiative, which Xiaomi stressed is not a partnership but merely assistance with the trial, is an interesting one because it again shows Microsoft’s new ‘platform agnostic’ approach.

Neither Microsoft nor Xiaomi provided specific details of the Windows 10 software being trialled, but TechCrunch understands from sources that it effectively overrides Android, turning the Xiaomi phone into a Windows 10 device complete with Microsoft services. (Which the company hopes will dazzle Android owners into making the switch.)

That’s to say that the software doesn’t offer a dual boot option, which Microsoft has pushed in the past in India. This is a ROM, based on Windows, that operates much like software from Cyanogen — a company Microsoft was incorrectly linked with an investment in — and other custom ROMs developed by the likes of Tencent and Baidu in China.

The ROM is thus designed to go beyond Microsoft’s Android apps and offer a native-like Windows experience on Android phones.

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Comment: Re:So where is the cop outrage? (Score 1) 719

by SoulMan007 (#24422097) Attached to: Citizens Spy On Big Brother

Why aren't the 'good cops' turning in their corrupt, violent and evil coworkers?

Sorry, until I see more exposure of bad cops from within their departments, I'm lumping the 'good cops' in with the bad cops.

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

I think the words of Edmund Burke sums it up pretty nicely.

Role Playing (Games)

+ - Blizzard's EULA compliant WoW spyware->

Submitted by
Corrado
Corrado writes: "rootkit has a fairly good look at the "warden client" that comes with every copy of World of Warcraft. Apparently, this little piece of software is very liberal in what it does to your computer and gathers quite a bit of data. Every 15 seconds it looks at all your open windows, every process, URLs, IMs, etc. and checks to see if your cheating. This feels like a massive invasion of privacy and its all perfectly legal through the WoW EULA."
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Government

US Spies Use Custom Video Games for Training 148

Posted by Soulskill
from the no-idkfa-allowed dept.
Wired reports that the US Defense Intelligence Agency has just acquired three PC-based video games which they will use to train the next wave of analysts. The games are short, but they have branching story lines that change depending on how a trainee reacts to various problems. Quoting: "'It is clear that our new workforce is very comfortable with this approach,' says Bruce Bennett, chief of the analysis-training branch at the DIA's Joint Military Intelligence Training Center. Wired.com had an opportunity to play all three games, Rapid Onset, Vital Passage and Sudden Thrust. The titles may conjure images of blitzkrieg, but the games themselves are actually a surprisingly clever and occasionally surreal blend of education, humor and intellectual challenge, aimed at teaching the player how to think."
PC Games (Games)

+ - Pirated 'Grand Theft Auto IV' Hits Internet

Submitted by
Narrative Fallacy
Narrative Fallacy writes: "Illegal copies of the new GTA IV game appear to be available for download from bit torrent file-sharing sites, six days before the game is officially released. The files in question are supposedly an illegal copy of the Xbox 360 version of the game, and have been seeded across various torrent sites by a group calling themselves iCON. Grand Theft Auto IV, which gets its official global release on April 29, is expected to sell around six million copies in its first week. When the first Grand Theft Auto appeared just over ten years ago it was a top-down-view, two-dimensional game with fairly rudimentary graphics produced by a small Scottish designer. "In terms of someone successfully combining an action game and an exploratory world to hang out in and be entertained by," says Rockstar's senior creative honcho Dan Houser, "it was definitely the first game that did it successfully. The mission play was there and the non-mission play was there and you moved between the two very seamlessly." GTA IV may retain the classic lines and and slick handling of its predecessors but it has been given a thorough tune-up. "The big deal", says Houser, was "detail — our goal was to make a high-definition gaming experience and then figure out what that means tonally through the whole experience, so it's not just about graphics, it's about animation, physics, writing, storytelling, physics, characterisation...""
Data Storage

Current Recommendations For a Home File Server? 170

Posted by timothy
from the must-hold-stuff-must-dish-stuff dept.
j.sanchez1 writes "The recent coverage of Shuttle's new KPC has gotten me thinking (again) about a small, low-cost headless file server for home. In the past, I have looked at the iPaq and considered using older computers I have lying around, but for various reasons I have never jumped in to do it. Do you guys have any suggestions on what to use for a home file server (hardware and software)? The server would be feeding files to Windows PCs and connected to the network through a Linksys WRT54GL running DD-WRT firmware." There are a host of good options these days; what has the best bang for the home-user's buck?
Books

+ - Computer games and architecture - the first book->

Submitted by
Jason Roth
Jason Roth writes: "This excellent book is on the way — probably publishing in November. The contributors talk about the new connections between computer games and real-world architecture. These game designers are all involved: Ernest Adams, Ian Bogost, Noah Falstein, James Korris, Frank Lantz, American McGee, Keita Takahashi, Katie Salen, Eric Zimmerman. Will be worth checking out."
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Announcements

+ - Watermarking to replace DRM? 3

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: News.com has an article on the announcement of Microsoft and Universal to introduce watermarking technology into audio files. The technology could serve several purposes including tracking file sharing statistics and insertion of advertisements into audio tracks. The article goes on to suggest that watermarking could possibly replace DRM in the near future.

"When the going gets tough, the tough get empirical." -- Jon Carroll

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