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+ - Reasons employers don't hire the best available engineers->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Hiring engineering talent is tricky business these days, and sadly enough, employers are largely terrible at managing this — their biggest need.

This post is written by a startup called Mighty Spring (https://www.mightyspring.com) which is helping employers overcome this challenge, and is from their perspective of how the companies they work with could improve their ability to hire the best of the best."

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Comment: Re:Twitter, instead of (Score 1) 141

by Some.Net(Guy) (#33503454) Attached to: Journalist Tricked Captors Into Twitter Access
TFA said that the guard didn't know what the internet was. i'm pretty sure that that could extend to email as well. i'm not saying it wasn't clever, but i feel like if i am captured by the taliban and have internet access for a small window of time, i'm going to send an email to someone like my parents or a close friend.

Comment: Re:What Are You Hiding? (Score 1) 346

by Some.Net(Guy) (#33468548) Attached to: Anti-Google Video Runs In Times Square
You missed the first part of my post, where I said I understand the right to privacy. Obviously you've taken it to the extreme, active privacy invasion vs passive privacy invasion, which is pretty much what I would expect from a flamebaiter. Google does not peer in your windows or tap your phones. They house data that you WILLINGLY give them. What do I mean? You use their free email service (gmail), their free browser (chrome), their free search engine (well, google), and any other of the myriad of products they offer to you FOR FREE. of course they're going to keep user data. so does yahoo, microsoft, or any other free service that you use. don't like it? stay in your locked house with all the windows covered and your huge fence and off the internet, because every little thing you do is tracked somehow somewhere. it doesn't mean the cyburrpoleece are listening in right now waiting to nab you if you say something wrong in an email. but if you think that, yeah you don't belong on the internet.

Comment: What Are You Hiding? (Score 0, Troll) 346

by Some.Net(Guy) (#33467818) Attached to: Anti-Google Video Runs In Times Square
Sure I understand that you have a right to privacy, but if you aren't doing anything wrong, why do you care? I don't care that Google scans the content of my email to provide me with relevant ads. I never look at them or click on them. I'm not doing anything I shouldn't be doing online, so if Google knows that I go to a certain website (say, slashdot) more than others and makes it pop up when I type the letter "s" in the address bar, that's awesome for me. I seriously think people are blowing this out of proportion.

Comment: In the event my blog comment doesn't get approved (Score 1) 702

by Some.Net(Guy) (#33220710) Attached to: The Case Against Net Neutrality
here's what I posted: This is the worst argument against net neutrality, ever. You're comparing the internet to newspapers and airlines. Let's think about this for a second. Newspapers are read-only media that do nothing but provide information. No business-critical services are built around a newspaper, except for the publisher of said newspaper. If my newspaper could, say, allow people to purchase my product through it directly or allow people to interact with my ad, then maybe they could be comparable. This is a bad metaphor. Next you compare the internet to airlines, which is laughable. Comparing first-class service on an airline to maybe that of a train is comparable, but not the internet. Sure, paying for faster service is tenable, but for BETTER service, or simply access? If I don't want better service on a plane, I will still end up at my destination. However, without net neutrality, UNLESS I pay for better service, I can't necessarily get to my destination. Unless you have something better than these examples for metaphors, I suggest you rethink your arguments.

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