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Comment oversight? (Score 1) 1

The data would instead be stored by the phone companies themselves, and could be accessed by intelligence agencies only after approval of the secret "Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court.

They mean the same FISA court that has been rubber stamping every request put before it since the court was created?

This is nothing more than moving the stored data from the government to the telcos. The ability of the government to troll your data has not been lessened in the least.

More lip service... still no privacy. Typical Washington tone deafness.

Submission + - Here's Why Patents Are Innovation's Worst Enemy (

walterbyrd writes: Patents did serve an important purpose during the days when technology advances happened over decades or centuries. In today’s era of exponentially advancing technologies, however, patents have become the greatest inhibitor to innovation and are holding the United States back. The only way of staying ahead is to out-innovate a competitor; speed to market and constant reinvention are critical. Patents do the reverse; they create disincentives to innovate and slow down innovators by allowing technology laggards and extortionists to sue them.

Submission + - RIP Robin Williams (

An anonymous reader writes: The 63 year old renowned actor has passed away. Death linked to suicude.

Submission + - DC Comics refuses to license Superman logo for murdered child's memorial. ( 1

GuyverDH writes: DC Comics has refused to allow the Superman logo to be used on a memorial for a 5 year old child, Jeffrey Baldwin, that was starved to death by his grandparents.
Jeffrey Baldwin was a huge fan of anything Superman, and when the story came out about the circumstances of his murder, the community wanted to do something for him. They raised funds to create a memorial statue with the Kryptonian S on the chest.
The latest incarnation of the Superman saga, Man of Steel, tells us that it's not an S, but a symbol for "Hope".
What better use for the symbol of hope, than on a memorial to a murdered child, in hopes that nothing like this happens again.
DC Comics doesn't feel that way, perhaps they don't feel at all.
They implied that it would put a stain or stigma on their trademark to allow it to be used for his memorial because of the conditions surrounding his death.
If Superman were real, he would have stood up for Jeffrey, maybe even prevented his death. At the very least he certainly would have been the first one there to carve his symbol on the memorial himself with his heat vision.

Submission + - Site of 1976 'Atomic Man' accident to be cleaned (

mdsolar writes: "Workers are finally preparing to enter one of the most dangerous rooms in the world — the site of a 1976 blast in the United States that exposed a technician to a massive dose of radiation and led to his nickname: the "Atomic Man."

Harold McCluskey, then 64, was working in the room at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation when a chemical reaction caused a glass glove box to explode.

He was exposed to the highest dose of radiation from the chemical element americium ever recorded — 500 times the occupational standard.

Hanford, located in central Washington state, made plutonium for nuclear weapons for decades. The room was used to recover radioactive americium, a byproduct of plutonium.

Covered with blood, McCluskey was dragged from the room and put into an ambulance headed for the decontamination center. Because he was too hot to handle, he was removed by remote control and transported to a steel-and-concrete isolation tank.

During the next five months, doctors laboriously extracted tiny bits of glass and razor-sharp pieces of metal embedded in his skin.

Nurses scrubbed him down three times a day and shaved every inch of his body every day. The radioactive bathwater and thousands of towels became nuclear waste."

Comment Re:Gen Alexander lied again (Score 1) 7

Since you do not appear to be keeping up with the news, permit me to enlighten you.

By the NSA’s own recent admission, they do not know how many, nor which documents were taken by Snowden. This is due to both poor oversight of those accessing the data, we well as poor auditing of access to those same documents.

From this it is simple to conclude that they are also unable to know how many people are abusing the system. The articles you quoted only point to people the NSA is aware of. I would also point out some of those abuses occurred years ago and were only caught when the employees confessed, they were not caught by NSA auditing or oversight.

It would be foolish to think these few people that have faced discipline are the only ones abusing the records held by the NSA. The system appears to be far too easy to abuse, the oversight and auditing is near to nonexistent, and the sheer number of people with access to the data is enormous.

I am going to say with my belief that you are a shill and also possibly a fool to boot.

Submission + - Scientific American's silencing of a blogger (

Lasrick writes: This is pretty astonishing: Danielle N. Lee, Ph.D, the Urban Scientist blogger at Scientific American, has been mistreated twice: once by the blog editor at and now by SciAm itself. The blog editor asked Dr. Lee to contribute a blog post at Biology-Online, and when she declined (presumably for lack of monetary compensation), the blog editor asked her whether she was "an urban scientist or an urban whore." Wow. Then, SciAm deleted her blog post, in which she wrote about the incident. Very disappointing.

Submission + - NSA may have collected data on *ALL* Verizon customers (

Taco Cowboy writes: I sincerely hope that the following bit from the Guardian of UK is not true, but ...

NSA may have harvested all the call data from US mobile provider Verizon since April, according to a secret court order leaked to The Guardian

The order was granted by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court on April 25 and instructs Verizon to hand over the "session identifying information (e.g., originating and terminating telephone number, International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) number, International Mobile station Equipment Identity (IMEI) number, etc.), trunk identifier, telephone calling card numbers, and time and duration of call."

Submission + - Prenda hammered: Judge sends porn-trolling lawyers to criminal investigators (

SternisheFan writes: ArsTechnica Aurich Lawson reports:

Lawyers who lied and obfuscated for years face disbarment and a $82,000 fine.

US District Judge Otis Wright has no love for the lawyers who set up the copyright-trolling operation that came to be known as Prenda Law. But Wright at least acknowledges their smarts in his long-awaited order, released today. Wright's order is a scathing 11-page document, suggesting Prenda masterminds John Steele and Paul Hansmeier should be handed over for criminal investigation. In the first page though, there's almost some admiration expressed for the sheer dark intelligence of their scheme. The copyright-trolling scheme that has reached its apex with Prenda is so complete, so mathematical.

"Plaintiffs have outmaneuvered the legal system," Wright begins. He goes on:

"They've discovered the nexus of antiquated copyright laws, paralyzing paralyzing social stigma, and unaffordable defense costs. And they exploit this anomaly by accusing individuals of illegally downloading a single pornographic video. Then they offer to settle—for a sum calculated to be just below the cost of a bare-bones defense. For these individuals, resistance is futile; most reluctantly pay rather than have their names associated with illegally downloading porn. So now, copyright laws originally designed to compensate starving artists allow, starving attorneys in this electronic-media era to plunder the citizenry."

And yes, if reading "resistance is futile" rattles something in your brain—Wright's order is thoroughly peppered with Star Trek references.

The plaintiffs have a right to assert their intellectual property rights, "so long as they do it right," Wright acknowledges. That's not what happened here, though. Prenda lawyers used "the same boilerplate complaints against dozens of defendants," without telling the judge. Instead, defense lawyers like Morgan Pietz flagged the dozens of related cases. "It was when the Court realized Plaintiffs engaged their cloak of shell companies and fraud that the court went to battlestations," stated Wright.


Submission + - Sony Rootkit Redux: Canadian Business Groups Lobby For Right To Install Spyware (

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Geist reports that a coalition of Canadian industry groups, including the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian Marketing Association, the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association and the Entertainment Software Association of Canada, are demanding legalized spyware for private enforcement purposes. The potential scope of coverage is breathtaking: a software program secretly installed by an entertainment software company designed to detect or investigate alleged copyright infringement would be covered by this exception. This exception could potentially cover programs designed to block access to certain websites (preventing the contravention of a law as would have been the case with SOPA), attempts to access wireless networks without authorization, or even keylogger programs tracking unsuspecting users (detection and investigation).

Submission + - New "We the People" Petition against the use of executive orders for Gun Control (

sgtspacemonkey writes: A new "We the People" petition has been created against the president using an executive order to apply Gun Control measures. This trend should be frighting to those on both side of the debate, as it could set the precedent that Executive Orders that basically bypass congress in enacting laws that Congress does not agree upon.
The Internet

Submission + - U.S Congressman Wants to Ban Internet Bills (

SchrodingerZ writes: "Representative Darrell Issa, a republican congressman from California, has drafted a bill for the internet. The bill, aptly named the Internet American Moratorium Act (IAMA), is, "a two-year moratorium on any new laws, rules or regulations governing the Internet." In short it hopes to deny any new government bills related to lawmaking on the internet for the next two years. The bill was first made public on the website Reddit, and is currently on the front page of, a website advocating internet rights. "Together we can make Washington take a break from messing w/ the Internet," Issa writes on his Reddit post. The initial response to the bill has been mixed. Users of Reddit are skeptical of the paper's motives and credibility. As of now, the bill is just a discussion draft, whether it will gain footing in the future is up in the air."

Put not your trust in money, but put your money in trust.