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+ - Marriott fined $600,000 for jamming guest hotspots-> 1

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Marriott will cough up $600,000 in penalties after being caught blocking mobile hotspots so that guests would have to pay for its own WiFi services, the FCC has confirmed today. The fine comes after staff at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville, Tennessee were found to be jamming individual hotspots and then charging people up to $1,000 per device to get online.

Marriott has been operating the center since 2012, and is believed to have been running its interruption scheme since then. The first complaint to the FCC, however, wasn't until March 2013, when one guest warned the Commission that they suspected their hardware had been jammed."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:This is going to end so well for them! (Score 1) 147

by Snowgen (#47665951) Attached to: T-Mobile To Throttle Customers Who Use Unlimited LTE Data For Torrents/P2P

And on top of that, they don't cut you off, they just throttle you.

The point is, though, that T-Mobile sells unlimited data to everyone, and what they charge extra for is unlimited 4G LTE data. So if you're being throttled, you're not getting the 4G speed you paid extra for.

Open Source

Parallax Completes Open Hardware Vision With Open Source CPU 136

Posted by timothy
from the this-case-is-totally-proprietary dept.
First time accepted submitter PotatoHead (12771) writes "This is a big win for Open Hardware Proponents! The Parallax Propeller Microcontroller VERILOG code was released today, and it's complete! Everything you need to run Open Code on an Open CPU design. This matters because you can now build a device that is open hardware, open code all the way down to the CPU level! Either use a product CPU, and have access to its source code to understand what and how it does things, or load that CPU onto a suitable FPGA and modify it or combine it with your design."

+ - Google Lowers Search Ranking of Websites That Don't Use Encryption->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Google is taking Internet security into its own hands, punishing sites that don't use encryption by giving them lower search rankings. The use of https is now one of the signals, like whether a Web page has unique content, that Google uses to determine where a site will appear in search rankings, although it will be a 'lightweight' signal and applies to about 1 percent of search queries now, wrote Zineb Ait Bahajji and Gary Illyes, both Google webmaster trends analysts, in a blog post."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Computer Gaming Gaming (Score 5, Informative) 82

by Snowgen (#47058029) Attached to: World's First Dedicated Gaming Magazine Is Facing Closure

...the world's first magazine dedicated to gaming...

Okay, I'm being pedantic here, but this is one of my pet peeves. "Computer Gaming" is not Gaming. It is a lesser thing--a subset of the greater whole.

This was not the first gaming magazine-- Games magazine came out in 1977 and The Dragon was in 1976. Both of these magazines were dedicated to gaming (with Games being the more general use of that term).

Don't even get me started on calling computer games RPGs.

+ - Indian space agency prototypes its first crew capsule->

Submitted by sixsigma1978
sixsigma1978 (3554851) writes "India is about to take one small step towards human space flight. Last week the country’s space agency unveiled a prototype of its first crew capsule, a 4-metre-high module designed to carry two people into low Earth orbit.

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is planning a test flight for later this year – even though it still awaits government approval and funding for a human space-flight programme. The unpiloted capsule will fly on the maiden launch of a new type of rocket that would otherwise have carried a dummy payload."

Link to Original Source

+ - Tor is building an anonymous instant messenger

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""Forget the $16 billion romance between Facebook and WhatsApp. There's a new messaging tool worth watching.

Tor, the team behind the world's leading online anonymity service, is developing a new anonymous instant messenger client, according to documents produced at the Tor 2014 Winter Developers Meeting in Reykjavik, Iceland.""

+ - Quebec language police target store owner's Facebook page->

Submitted by wassomeyob
wassomeyob (3554531) writes "In Canada, the province of Quebec has their Official Language Act of 1974 (aka Bill 22) which makes French their sole official language. It has famously been used to force business owners to modify signage to give French pre-eminance over other languages. Now, the Quebec language police seem to be extending their reach to Facebook.

Eva Cooper owns Delilah in the Parc — a shop in Chelsea, Quebec near the Quebec/Ontario border. She received a letter from the language office telling her to translate everything posted on her store's Facebook page into French."

Link to Original Source

+ - Spy agency intercepts webcam images ..->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Britain's surveillance agency GCHQ, with aid from the US National Security Agency, intercepted and stored the webcam images of millions of internet users not suspected of wrongdoing, secret documents reveal.

GCHQ files dating between 2008 and 2010 explicitly state that a surveillance program codenamed Optic Nerve collected still images of Yahoo webcam chats in bulk and saved them to agency databases, regardless of whether individual users were an intelligence target or not."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Not as bad as the reviews made it seem (Score 1) 178

by Snowgen (#46091313) Attached to: IBM's PC Junior Turns 30, Too

True, but a C64 with a floppy drive and monitor would exceed the 1000$ barrier as well.

Citation, please

It just so happens that 1984 was the year that I bought my C=64, and it cost $150. And also (a little later) in 1984, after getting bored of loading Telengard from cassette, and really wanting to play Zork that I bought my 1541 from Toys R' US, for $150. That's $300. I don't recall the monitor prices (I used a used TV i picked up at a flea market), but I believe they were $300-$400.

Comment: Evil App (Score 1) 1

by Snowgen (#46090667) Attached to: Why does Facebook need to read my Text Messages?

Once upon a time I was buying some SLR lenses from a Craigslist posting. Dude and I exchanged some phone calls about the price and condition and setting up the meeting.

About a week later Facebook started suggesting some random name as a connection. The name was vaguely familiar, but I couldn't place it. Then it occurred to the that random suggested connection had the same last name as Dude! Sure enough, it was his son.

The moral of the story is that the Facebook app trolls your call history for connections. That's too evil for my taste, and the app has been removed ever since.

To be fair, the app did ask for permission, but I always said no. But it would keep asking and keep asking and I eventually accidentally touched the wrong response. And while it claimed I could turn that feature off at any time, I never found the preference.

Like I said, I removed the app, and haven't really missed it.

+ - The Linux Backdoor Attempt of 2003

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Ed Felton writes about an incident, in 2003, in which someone tried to backdoor the Linux kernel. Back in 2003 Linux used a system called BitKeeper to store the master copy of the Linux source code. If a developer wanted to propose a modification to the Linux code, they would submit their proposed change, and it would go through an organized approval process to decide whether the change would be accepted into the master code. But some people didn’t like BitKeeper, so a second copy of the source code was kept so that developers could get the code via another code system called CVS. On November 5, 2003, Larry McAvoy noticed that there was a code change in the CVS copy that did not have a pointer to a record of approval. Investigation showed that the change had never been approved and, stranger yet, that this change did not appear in the primary BitKeeper repository at all. Further investigation determined that someone had apparently broken in electronically to the CVS server and inserted this change.

if ((options == (__WCLONE|__WALL)) && (current->uid = 0))
retval = -EINVAL;

A casual reading by an expert would interpret this as innocuous error-checking code to make wait4 return an error code when wait4 was called in a certain way that was forbidden by the documentation. But a really careful expert reader would notice that, near the end of the first line, it said “= 0” rather than “== 0” so the effect of this code is to give root privileges to any piece of software that called wait4 in a particular way that is supposed to be invalid. In other words it’s a classic backdoor. We don’t know who it was that made the attempt—and we probably never will. But the attempt didn’t work, because the Linux team was careful enough to notice that that this code was in the CVS repository without having gone through the normal approval process. "Could this have been an NSA attack? Maybe. But there were many others who had the skill and motivation to carry out this attack," writes Felton. "Unless somebody confesses, or a smoking-gun document turns up, we’ll never know.""

It's a poor workman who blames his tools.

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