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Comment: This is just the way new technology is created (Score 4, Insightful) 143

by Smeagel (#38767860) Attached to: See the Tesla S at the Detroit International Auto Show (Video)
Often times the first generations of new technology are so extremely expensive, that only the rich can afford them. Then slowly, with iterations and perfections, the prices come down to normal consumer prices. Almost every breakthrough technology has been that way, car's, computers, tv's, home entertainment. The thing is, unless there's the initial generation of very expensive technology, there's usually no starting point for engineers to slowly develop improved and cheaper ways to build. It's rare a technology goes from non-existent to every consumer can afford it. Also keep in mind Tesla isn't trying to compete with Toyota sedans, it's trying to compete with high-end BMW, Audi, Infiniti sedans. As in other automobile technologies, the cheaper sedans benefit from all the R&D that goes into the more expensive sedans, as their features slowly trickle into the cheaper sedans.
Programming

Should Younger Developers Be Paid More? 785

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the you-deserve-a-raise dept.
jammag writes "A project manager describes facing an upset senior developer who learned that a new hire — a fresh college grad — would be making 30 percent more than him. The reason: the new grad knew a hot emerging technology that a client wanted. Yes, the senior coder was majorly pissed off. But with the constant upheaval in new technology, this situation is almost unavoidable — or is it? And at any rate, is it fair?"
Image

Survey Shows That Fox News Makes You Less Informed 1352

Posted by samzenpus
from the fair-balanced-and-simple dept.
A survey of American voters by World Public Opinion shows that Fox News viewers are significantly more misinformed than consumers of news from other sources. One of the most interesting questions was about President Obama's birthplace. 63 percent of Fox viewers believe Obama was not born in the US (or that it is unclear). In 2003 a similar study about the Iraq war showed that Fox viewers were once again less knowledgeable on the subject than average. Let the flame war begin!

Comment: Re:Study economic supply elasticity (Score 1) 797

by Smeagel (#33547744) Attached to: GE Closes Last US Light Bulb Factory
I'm not talking about during the bubble (if I was talking about bubble to recession, oil dropped from 130 to 35, so I would have said it dropped 75%). What I'm talking about was post-bubble-popping to realization-of-recession. Which was about a 40% drop. With something as inelastic as oil, a 3-5% drop in demand leads to a 40% drop in price.

And what you're saying about speculation is a natural side effect of an inelastic supply - or perhaps "slowly elastic" is the better description. When it takes a long time to increase supply and short periods of time for demand to change, it *necessitates* speculation.

Comment: Re:Study economic supply elasticity (Score 1) 797

by Smeagel (#33547060) Attached to: GE Closes Last US Light Bulb Factory
I agree with you that energy prices should "tax" high energy users. I'd say one of the biggest things holding this back are older people on fixed income that can't afford capital investment in their homes to make them more energy efficient, but suffer through high energy bills every year.

When push comes to shove this one made it though because most people don't really care about using CFLs or incandescent, and nobody cares deeply about it. If we can knock a meaningful percent off our energy usage without seriously upsetting people, politicians will do it. Can't blame them.

As a side-note, I'm not sure about the math since it's an ad slogan, but I live in NYC and they had posters up for a while that said:
"If every New Yorker switched to CFL's it would save enough energy to power the MTA."

The subway and buses alone get about 7 million people a day to their jobs - and that's not even counting the massively popular above ground commuter trains. This is a measurable amount of energy we're talking about...

Comment: Study economic supply elasticity (Score 1) 797

by Smeagel (#33546780) Attached to: GE Closes Last US Light Bulb Factory
Energy supply is very inelastic, which means small changes in demand can be reflected by LARGE changes in price.

It should never be underestimated what a small change in energy demand can do to raise/lower prices (for all of us). Remember when the recession hit, and energy demand went down a few percent, and oil prices shot down 40%?

Also - thinking of each consumer making their own choice only affecting themselves is not accurate when you're in a market where your neighbors poor choices make it significantly more expensive for everyone.

Comment: Re:Why not just use a Linux distribution? (Score 1) 177

by Smeagel (#32471754) Attached to: MorphOS 2.5 Released, Supports More Old Macs
Security, stability, plethora of truly free applications...tons of reasons that make your day-to-day tasks much faster. Hell half the reason I dislike windows so much these days is the UI, I just work faster on my fully-customized linux machine.

Even if you say these reason are all arguable, which they are, at least there are solid arguable reasons. I've seen no such arguments for MorphOS.

Comment: Re:Ready Pitchforks! (Score 1) 909

by Smeagel (#31931468) Attached to: Steve Jobs Recommends Android For Fans of Porn

Because the bolded part isn't true. If it were, then you'd be correct.

Apple isn't refusing to carry porn because they don't want you to view porn. It's because they don't want to carry porn. This is so exceptionally simple.

What exactly isn't true about apple not allowing you to run programs that do things they don't want you to do? They don't want you using google voice, so they don't let google put an app up (aka they don't let you run it). They have a long history of trying to brick peoples devices who get through apples protection - why do that if it was all about the "user experience"? If someone willingly opted out of the user experience, why is apple deliberately destroying that persons user experience to preserve the "user experience"? Take your time responding, I realize you're very busy drinking koolaid these days.

Comment: Re:Ready Pitchforks! (Score 1) 909

by Smeagel (#31929568) Attached to: Steve Jobs Recommends Android For Fans of Porn

This is absurd. The only thing they are controlling is the apps on their store. They are not trying to control what you think, nor what you do while using their products. AT ALL.

"AT ALL."???

How is "you're not allowed to run programs that do things we don't want you to do" not being controlled "AT ALL"? Please let's not pretend like this is just porn. They rejected a satire app a few months ago, as has been widely publicized. The rejected the google voice app - and you can bet your ass it's not because it would "limit the iphone experience". Google apps are very high quality. The reason they did it is because you're 100% wrong, they DO want to control what you do while using their products. They want to COMPLETELY control what you do - they deny you from doing anything they don't want you to do, that's COMPLETE control, the very opposite of your claim.

Comment: Re:News Flash: Apple limits app store! (Score 1) 664

by Smeagel (#31864562) Attached to: Apple Blocks Cartoonist From App Store
Actually when you have a mostly-open marketplace and you ban certain messages from being communicated there - that's the very definition of censorship.

You obscure the argument by introducing the concept of 'publication', which implies selectivity in the first place. A place that houses public offerings is more like a forum than a 'publication' - censoring those offerings by their content is certainly censorship.

Comment: Re:Hopefully they aren't too effective.. (Score 1) 347

by Smeagel (#31823310) Attached to: MIT Researchers Harness Viruses To Split Water
Dear God this is psuedointellectual.

RTFA - the virus isn't even the thing splitting the water, it's basically just acting as a source to channel sunlight onto the Iridium compound which splits the water. The transition metal compounds that can split water have been around for years (check JACS, you'll find dozens of articles), the thing that keeps this whole thing so far from being feasible is how expensive those compounds are in comparison to the energy they allow you to generate.

The only "story" about this "story" is how computer nerds always easily find ways to convince themselves they're smarter than specialized scientists in other fields after reading a dumbed down summary of a paper.

Comment: Re:laughable (Score 1) 647

by Smeagel (#30440650) Attached to: Eolas Sues World + Dog For AJAX Patent
I'm not sure what capitalist society you're talking about, but you need to visit some inner-city schools and spend some time in those neighborhoods and tell me about how children born there have the ability to create their own happiness. Then think how it'd be one hundred times worse if schools were fully private, as libertarianism deteriorates the situation.

I'm not quite sure how the progress of ones life being dependent on the wealth of their parents is giving the individual the ability to create their own happiness... Libertarians are every bit as much out of touch with the realities of society as communists are.

If this is timesharing, give me my share right now.

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