Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Old Habits Die Hard (Score 1) 442

That would force them to make ABP a proxy server

While I do believe that ad-blocking will ultimately be done by a proxy server and have said this before, ABP as software as it is now is dependent on the browser's add-on architecture. The company/developer behind it could, of course, evolve both their core product and release something entirely different such as a ad-filtering proxy [service]. As for Mozilla and Firefox, yes, people will jump ship if it loses support for ad-blocking tech. If Mozilla were to cave, I'd expect the other major browsers to do so as well. Before a suggestion is made that people can always use a ad-block supporting browser growing from a fork, Jane and Joe Mainstream isn't even going to know that this is an option, let alone going to do it.

Comment Re: Old Habits Die Hard (Score 1) 442

Would you buy a car that slammed on the brakes

Of course not. Now, do understand the inconvenience and annoyance of ads as they are now and have been hasn't reached the level that such behavior of a car is at. The bigger problem is that it won't just be one make or model or browser, all major offerings will adopt this type of practice in a collusion-wrapped way if it serves their interest financially. Such a change may bring additional revenue or reduce legal expenses. Either way, it is money.

Comment Re:Old Habits Die Hard (Score 1) 442

While I do believe that ad-blocking will ultimately be done by a proxy server and have said this before, ABP as software as it is now is dependent on the browser's add-on architecture. The company/developer behind it could, of course, evolve both their core product and release something entirely different such as a ad-filtering proxy [service].

As for Mozilla and Firefox, yes, people will jump ship if it loses support for ad-blocking tech. If Mozilla were to cave, I'd expect the other major browsers to do so as well. Before a suggestion is made that people can always use a ad-block supporting browser growing from a fork, Jane and Joe Mainstream isn't even going to know that this is an option, let alone going to do it.

Comment Re:Old Habits Die Hard (Score 1, Interesting) 442

ABP is not going away

At least for Firefox, ABP is very dependent on Mozilla continuing to develop a browser that supports 3rd party add-ons. While this feature clearly makes their browser more appealing to people, ABP could be effectively shutdown if Mozilla cooperated with the Ad Industry and Content Providers in such a way that prevented their add-on(s) from working.

Comment Re:More Big Data for Big Government (Score 1) 48

Many people will probably scan their whole home

Well, I won't be scanning my rooms. When there is a need, I will take some measurements with one of those fancy, hand-held retractable tape thingies, use a pen and paper to take note of these, and then proceed with the project I have in mind. I can even use a pen and paper or spreadsheet application on my computer to whip up some mock drawings to play around with placement ideas. I know, so advanced! A bonus is that I still can do this when my do-everything-under-the-damn-sun phone is bitching about a low battery.

Comment Re:Lenovo Malware (Score 1) 48

people too lazy to enter a zip code or a map program

I'm with you on this. I don't need or want a weather app on my mobile phone as long as the bookmark for Weather.com's page for my zip code continues to load in my web browser. This approach has been working just fine for along time and isn't wasting system resources while the page isn't loaded. And I only had to type the zipcode once. Hard work, I know.

Comment Re:You get what you deserve for using comcast. (Score 1) 119

A pizza should never be cooked by microwaves. Now, if the "microwave" happens to be a combination unit also supporting, perhaps, convection cooking, it is okay to use the "microwave" to cook the thing. The bonus of cnvection cooking is that having a slice or three doesn't have to come at the expense of a home security system failure between the press of start and the ding heard once the timer has counted down.

Comment Re:I'm not exactly fond of it, but .... (Score 4, Insightful) 314

average/typical user doesn't CARE that any of this is taking place

Joe Sixpack might care if he knew and understood what was happening. He doesn't, because Microsoft and every other damn shading business and entity out there that is abusing him doesn't make clear their practices. This is all made worse, because far too many businesses have abusive policies. They all justify them internally by believing that it is okay since "all" their competitors are abusing. The consumer all too often doesn't have practical alternatives. So, simply leaving the correction to the market is not the right approach.

Comment Re:Cool Story.... (Score 1) 314

Time used means NOTHING

The problem isn't with usage as a specific monitored activity. The real issue is that damn slippery slope that it is on. In my opinion, it is not okay to collect data in this way and at the detail they do without each user on a given box opting in. The OS's monitoring and reporting back to Mother Microsoft shouldn't be turned on by default and require opting out in an inconvenient or otherwise discouraging way to be disabled. The opt-in prompt should be very obvious and make clear in few words what an opt-in allows. The prompt should reappear frequently. This behavior shouldn't be buried in a EULA or another widely disregarded document. People should have the choice to not participate even if doing so changes the cost of ownership. The consumer is forced to accept this type of abuse over and over from businesses, because there aren't practical alternatives to a very large degree.

Comment Re: so.... Firefox OS? (Score 1) 225

Ooooh boy. We got ourselves a genuine Internet Badass here!

Yep! Life here is pretty good as a genuine Internet bad ass! The hands of people worldwide click and tap uncontrollably just from the fear that I will might engage them! I was an Internet bad ass long before all those mindless bandwagon hoppers started installing apps for everything under the sun on their mobile devices.

Comment Re: so.... Firefox OS? (Score 1) 225

I bet the mainstream app user is a mindless consumer of bandwagon apps. They install too blindly and, likely, without a true need. I am not in the add-on App camp for the most part. Android gets Firefox. For work, it also gets a vendor's ticket management app. For my, CM Nook, it got Firefox, Pandora, and the Nook Reader. My iPhone 5S has no add-on apps.

Comment Re:Just serving the customer (Score 1) 189

done on the carrier side

This surely would only be available for a monthly fee, since they love plan add-ons. Five bucks this. Three bucks that. The customer will likely never see any type of ad filtering from a carrier until a revenue share model and agreements can exist. Such a service might cost $15 or more each month to provide enough money to offset the loss of ad revenue across an infinite number of websites. This hypothetical service will probably come from today's ad networks as a carrier resale.

Comment Re:This is a stretch but... (Score 1) 102

I'd like to see a move away from the free model started across the industry. People may not balk at paying again if "every" service and product cost again. The change certainly would need to be an coordinated movement among competitors since the jumping ship from the X that now costs to the X that is still free would be a threat.

Comment Re:Appification (Score 1) 44

There needs to be an equivalent of an "app browser" to run "apps" everywhere.

I'd rather we not appify everything and, instead, get back to having just websites. I'd also like see everyone accept that every application used by Joe User doesn't need to be reimplemented as a damn website or made dependent on the cloud.

Comment Re: Not acceptable. (Score 1) 665

You apparently haven't spent enough time around or supporting end users that are both smart and unable to understand and do simple tasks on the computer. They are tools to most people. I was once surprised when an engineer, even the young ones that grew up with tech everywhere, needed help for something simple enough where only reasoning through was needed. I am no longer surprised, because it only comes easy mostly to those of us working in IT.

Slashdot Top Deals

10.0 times 0.1 is hardly ever 1.0.

Working...