Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Medicalizing Normality (Score 1) 558

Yup. Declare normal human variation pathological, make money by "treating" it, laugh all the way to the bank.

I would also add that many of the "autistic" children I see aren't autistic at all, not by any standard I understand. They are children desperate for attention, and have found a way to get that attention.

Some may even be jumping on the autism bandwagon to be trendy. I've seen this with allergies, where kids want inhalers and shit so they fit in with their over-medicated peers.

...laura

Comment: TNG good and bad (Score 1) 512

by spaceyhackerlady (#46612145) Attached to: Why <em>Darmok</em> Is a Good <em>Star Trek: TNG</em> Episode

For the most part, TNG was competent. At its best it was brilliant. I'm with people on episodes like The Inner Light and The Measure of a Man. Add in, for me, Cause and Effect, The Emissary, a few others. The human condition, in space. Good stuff.

Unlike many, I actually liked The Dauphin.

I thought Darmok was an interesting idea. How do you make aliens who are, well, alien, but not so alien that you can't interact with them? This was an issue with the Borg, badass aliens who could kick the shit out of Klingons and not work up a sweat, but who were so alien that no meaningful interaction was possible.

Bad episodes? Yeah, there were a few. I prefer to remember the good ones.

...laura

+ - Ableton Live Killer "Bitwig Studio" Released for Linux->

Submitted by polyp2000
polyp2000 (444682) writes "Myself and a many others will be pretty excited to learn that we now have the option ditch proprietary os'es in the music studio because in addition to OSX & Windows ; Linux is supported. So here we have a cross-platform DAW designed from the upstart by a team who left Ableton to come up with something designed to shake up the market somewhat and solve some of the problems with traditional DAW's.

Some people may be a little disheartened to learn that it is not open source (that doenst really bother me) — but it does feature an open API to permit modding of the software. It also supports VST's and linux native plugins. I will be taking the demo for a test drive tonight. Are there any linux users here on Slashdot that have been lucky enough to have tried the beta yet?"

Link to Original Source

+ - SPAM: Porcelain Guy Wire Strain Insulators

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Antenna Systems & Solutions Inc., is pleased to stock the following porcelain insulator, porcelain guy strain insulator, johnny balls, porcelain insulator. Call 877-288-6139 for more information"
Link to Original Source

+ - KDE's Plasma Next will not support Wayland->

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "Initial release of Plasma Next won’t have full Wayland support. What does full support mean? As it is well known that the next generation of KDE Software will have separate release cycles for libraries (KDE Frameworks 5), workspaces (Plasma Next) and applications. So there are three sets of independent projects within the so-called “KDE Software” umbrella and each set has different level of support or integration with Wayland. So in a nutshell "KDE5" won't support Wayland."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:How about replacing the College Board? (Score 1) 134

by MacAndrew (#46415799) Attached to: College Board To Rethink the SAT, Partner With Khan Academy

That's very much the ideal of the SAT, to draw out kids who are bright but haven't shown in through grades. It does happen. Statistically however, GPA is still a better predictor. It's just not the only one, and the SAT is overrated—hence even its creator talking about reform (again). My (totally unscientific) experience has been that a lot of the super-groomed kids don't come across so great. Having a soul is valuable too.

Ideally of course you have good grades *and* SAT scores! My kid has, to put it mildly, a very wide spread between SATs and GPA. I have no idea what the schools will think. They *are* in fact looking to GPA more and more. I think they are aware of the reputations of a great many schools and of grade inflation. Like you, I went to a prep school where everyone went to college, and its reputation stood for a lot. And straight A's in all AP classes at a school people have heard of is a fair criterion.

I think most admissions decisions are made on relatively little info and reflection. A lot of schools admit half or more of their applicants, and only a fraction actually matriculate. I doubt the 20-somethings doing most of the review are working too hard at analyzing the applicants. None of the schools my son applied to, for example, had interviews. On the other hand, yes, some schools get into it a little harder.

Oh BTW—congrats on pulling through the morass!

Comment: Re:How about replacing the College Board? (Score 1) 134

by MacAndrew (#46414489) Attached to: College Board To Rethink the SAT, Partner With Khan Academy

No. My scores for example were "so what" at Harvard. At those schools, the SAT scores of many applicants tend to be so good that they don't matter. The school can admit all the 800 scores they want, but do go looking for other qualities. The statistical validity of the SAT above 700 or so is not very good and is not useful for distinguishing among candidates—the test is designed around the much lower and heavily populated mean. Moreover, the SAT is technically not an IQ test any more, rather a measure of scholastic "achievement." (The "A" in SAT used to stand for aptitude, until 1992 or so. Mensa no longer accepts SAT scores I think. I'm not endorsing IQ tests here either.)

Consider http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

Comment: How about replacing the College Board? (Score 5, Insightful) 134

by MacAndrew (#46414065) Attached to: College Board To Rethink the SAT, Partner With Khan Academy

While they debate what to do ... the Board itself should be challenged for its power and profiteering. They overcharge for things that should be dirt cheap like score reporting, keep pumping out more and more tests, and have surprisingly little proof of the validity of the tests themselves. Meanwhile the test prep industry is making millions, providing (or insinuating) false claims of what they can deliver, and helping wealth discrimination.

Closely timed fill-in-the-bubble test-taking skills are not valuable life skills, in college or elsewhere. FWIW I'm speaking as someone who got near-perfect SAT scores, as did my son, and have to admit it's a scam. The scores do mean *something,* but it's all gotten out of control. GPA is the single best predictor of performance. (But don't get me started on grade inflation....)

Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration. -- Thomas Alva Edison

Working...