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Comment: Now all together breath.... It's just a game.... (Score 1) 431

by SkyDragon (#37383160) Attached to: Why Aren't There More Civilians In Military Video Games?
I'm a little lost over the level of hysteria around some of these games... Why do we have to analyse this to death, in the end it is just a game. Do we stop young kids playing "ring a ring a rosie" because it pays reference back to the black death? Do we stop kids playing foot ball (all versions) because in the past this type of game was used to train soldiers? Do we stop girls from playing dress up with dolls because it reinforces gender stereotypes ..... woops, hang on.... Ok, were officially stuffed as a species, beam me up I want to get off.....

Comment: Re:Bad headline, bad article (Score 1) 510

by SkyDragon (#36593142) Attached to: Rootkit Infection Requires Windows Reinstall
I'm not sure that I would be confident that root kit X would not have the smarts to infect any type of online system backup. The point being made by many is that the only reliable way to get a compromised system back to a guaranteed clean state is to reinstall from a read only install media that comes from a known clean source. The problem then is to ensure that your data is clean before you restore it. Trusting that any tool will completely clean a system of infection without starting from scratch is overestimating the effectiveness of said too, and underestimating the inventiveness of the malware author.

Comment: Re:Corporate sponsorship for elections (Score 1) 97

by SkyDragon (#34250880) Attached to: Australian State Govt. To Fund iPads For Doctors
I work in a hospital. We've been playing a little with using iphone type devices, and you can use the capacitive touch screen whilst wearing standard surgical gloves, seems to be no problem. We have been playing with a number of windows based tablet devices specifically designed for a clinical environment, that use a pen interface, however due to there bulk, they all seem to end up being attached to a wall permanently and used there. You would get a lot more out of a desktop computer mounted in the same way. I can see a number of situations where a smaller IPad type device would be useful, however you need to start with a use (problem) and look for a solution, rather than take the technology and look for a way to justify having it. Just throwing an iPad a doctors will do nothing unless you have a comprehensive plan on how it will integrate with existing systems. This can be done, and should be done, but it will be expensive and time consuming.

Comment: Re:further proof (Score 2, Informative) 1027

by SkyDragon (#33556582) Attached to: Geocentrists Convene To Discuss How Galileo Was Wrong

that religion is on its last legs. First you had religion - it ruled all. Then science came (post christianity),

I think you may be mistaken, science has been around for a lot longer than Christianity... and you will find with a little research many scientists (including Darwin) who claimed to be Christian.

Comment: Re:"Think"? Or "Believe"? (Score 1) 1027

by SkyDragon (#33556540) Attached to: Geocentrists Convene To Discuss How Galileo Was Wrong

i'll try that again:::

Maybe they believe this because that is there daily experience. You may be certain that if you are on the moon and you drop a hammer and a feather at the same time, they will hit the deck at the same time.

For somebody who has never been to the Moon, and has never watched that bit of footage showing the experience, they know that the KNOW that the hammer will hit them on the toe whilst the feather is floating off in the breeze. They will be scientifically wrong only if you amend you question to include the stipulation "In a vacuum", and if you try to prove them wrong whilst in an atmosphere, you are going to look like a crank. (believe me I have tried to prove this to my kids, and only managed to reinforce there belief in there personal experience.)

The big problem with all of us "scientific" thinkers is that we have just as much "faith" in what we know as the next guy. I know that the planets orbit (mostly) around the sun, and can prove this is the best fit to the evidence by showing you a track of the inner and outer planets and showing how they behave differently during the year against the back ground stars.. I however cannot (without a large vacuum chamber) prove to you that the feather and hammer fall at the same rate, and having never conducted this experiment myself have to rely (have faith) that those experiments conducted by scientists that show this to be true, have been conducted correctly.

  For those who believe education is the solution to the "incorrect" thinking that is expressed by those who believe in an Earth centered universe, I would suggest a great deal of care. Education has been used by many interests through history to ensure that the population think and act in a certain way. You can steer a person to think just about anything just by controlling what knowledge they are or are not exposed to. The only way to really educate people to understand science and thereby the current state of scientific fact, is to expose them to experiences that allow them to believe what they themselves have seen and felt. Anything else is just another interest group espousing faith in their chosen book.

Comment: Re:"Think"? Or "Believe"? (Score 1) 1027

by SkyDragon (#33556476) Attached to: Geocentrists Convene To Discuss How Galileo Was Wrong
>>>>Many of these people probably also believe that heavy objects fall faster than light ones, not because they reject Galileo and his evidence and reasoning, but merely because they weren't paying attention that day in class. Maybe they believe this because that is there daily experience. You may be certain that if you are on the moon and you drop a hammer and a feather at the same time, they will hit the deck at the same time. For somebody who has never been to the Moon, and has never watched that bit of footage showing the experience, they know that the KNOW that the hammer will hit them on the toe whilst the feather is floating off in the breeze. They will be scientifically wrong only if you amend you question to include the stipulation "In a vacuum", and if you try to prove them wrong whilst in an atmosphere, you are going to look like a crank. (believe me I have tried to prove this to my kids, and only managed to reinforce there belief in there personal experience.) The big problem with all of us "scientific" thinkers is that we have just as much "faith" in what we know as the next guy. I know that the planets orbit (mostly) around the sun, and can prove this is the best fit to the evidence by showing you a track of the inner and outer planets and showing how they behave differently during the year against the back ground stars.. I however cannot (without a large vacuum chamber) prove to you that the feather and hammer fall at the same rate, and having never conducted this experiment myself have to rely (have faith) that those experiments conducted by scientists that show this to be true, have been conducted correctly. For those who believe education is the solution to the "incorrect" thinking that is expressed by those who believe in an Earth centered universe, I would suggest a great deal of care. Education has been used by many interests through history to ensure that the population think and act in a certain way. You can steer a person to think just about anything just by controlling what knowledge they are or are not exposed to. The only way to really educate people to understand science and thereby the current state of scientific fact, is to expose them to experiences that allow them to believe what they themselves have seen and felt. Anything else is just another interest group espousing faith in their chosen book.
Education

Portal On the Booklist At Wabash College 203

Posted by Soulskill
from the take-that-ebert dept.
jamie passes along this quote from a post by Michael Abbott at The Brainy Gamer: "This year, for the first time, a video game will appear on the syllabus of a course required for all students at Wabash College, where I teach. For me — and for a traditional liberal arts college founded in 1832 — this is a big deal. Alongside Gilgamesh, Aristotle's Politics, John Donne's poetry, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and the Tao Te Ching, freshmen at Wabash will also encounter a video game called Portal. "
Government

+ - Who should Australians vote for Tomorrow?

Submitted by SkyDragon
SkyDragon (1642677) writes "Australia is going to the polls tomorrow to vote for the federal government.

This has got to be one of the most difficult voting decisions for intelligent Australians to make an a long time. Do we vote for the Australian Labor Party who are promoting a fiber network to nearly every house, but also have a history of wanting to filter the internet with a hidden black list, or do we go with the Liberal National Party, who think fiber is a waste of time and think wireless can suffice, but believe in an opt in computer based optional filter? You could vote for the Greens who are supporting the fiber network but want nothing of any filtering, but they won't get into power directly and that still leaves you with a decision as to who to place second on the ticket.....

On other issues the major parties seem to be reading from the same script, with both supporting a hard line on "stopping the boats", and claiming the other has a poor economic record."
Robotics

Radio-Controlled Cyborg Beetles Become Reality 150

Posted by timothy
from the tsa-agents-didn't-show-enough-drive dept.
holy_calamity writes "DARPA's plans to create brain chips for insects so they can be steered like an RC plane are bearing fruit. Videos show that a team at Berkeley can use radio signals to tell palm-sized African beetles to take off and land, and to lose altitude and steer left or right when in flight. They had to use the less-than-inconspicuous giant beetles because other species are too weak to take off with the weight of the necessary antenna and brain and muscle electrodes."

FORTRAN is a good example of a language which is easier to parse using ad hoc techniques. -- D. Gries [What's good about it? Ed.]

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