Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×
EU

European Commission Proposes "Digital Single Market" and End To Geoblocking 134

Posted by samzenpus
from the one-big-happy-family dept.
An anonymous reader writes A new initiative from the European Commission proposes a reformed "single digital market", addressing a number of issues that it sees as obstructions to EU growth, including geoblocking — where services such as BBC's iPlayer are only available to IP addresses within the host country — and the high cost of parcel delivery and administration of disparate VAT rates across the member states. The ramifications of many of the proposals within the Digital Single Market project extend to non-EU corporations which have built their business model on the current isolationism of member state markets.
Firefox

Analysis: People Who Use Firefox Or Chrome Make Better Employees 127

Posted by Soulskill
from the also-handsomer-and-better-at-darts dept.
HughPickens.com writes: In the world of Big Data, everything means something. Now Joe Pinsker reports that Cornerstone OnDemand, a company that sells software that helps employers recruit and retain workers, has found after analyzing data on about 50,000 people who took its 45-minute online job assessment, that people who took the test on a non-default browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, ended up staying at their jobs about 15 percent longer than those who stuck with Safari or Internet Explorer. They also tended to perform better on the job as well. Chief Analytics Officer Michael Housman offered an explanation for the results in an interview with Freakonomics Radio: "I think that the fact that you took the time to install Firefox on your computer shows us something about you. It shows that you're someone who is an informed consumer," says Housman. "You've made an active choice to do something that wasn't default." But why would a company care about something as seemingly trivial as the browser a candidate chooses to use? "Call centers are estimated to suffer from a turnover rate of about 45 percent annually (PDF), and it can cost thousands of dollars to hire new employees," says Pinsker. "Because of that, companies are eager to find any proxy for talent and dedication that they can."

Comment: What is the alternative? (Score 2) 309

by SkunkPussy (#49125829) Attached to: Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course

Forward secrecy is desirable as we see the NSA hoover up messages then store them until they crack the keys.

Has anybody attempted to bolt forward secrecy on top of SMTP? I would assume that it would need some kind of session key exchange between sender and recipient which would preclude the use of SMTP.

Comment: Re:Pay us for other people's work (Score 1) 208

by SkunkPussy (#49033819) Attached to: Elementary OS: Why We Make You Type "$0"

Writing an OS kernel is very tough work

Writing a shell is very tough work

Writing a graphics driver is very tough work

Developing a package management infrastructure and packaging a large number of programmes is very tough work

Developing a compiler is very tough work.

I maintain that elementary OS have contributed no more than 1% of the effort of their distribution.

I am not saying that elementary don't deserve money, but that they should get to the back of the queue and they absolutely should not demand money for other people's work.

Comment: Pay us for other people's work (Score 5, Insightful) 208

by SkunkPussy (#49032587) Attached to: Elementary OS: Why We Make You Type "$0"

Elementary OS' contribution to their own distribution is probably less than 1%. Almost all the effort into writing and packaging the software has been carried out by others. They are standing on the shoulders of giants. Why the fuck should they demand money for other people's work? It is disrespectful to call people cheaters, when they are grabbing money in exchange for other people's work! If anything, that is cheating. Elementary OS are so entitled its untrue.

Medicine

Alcohol's Evaporating Health Benefits 305

Posted by Soulskill
from the so-much-for-that-justification dept.
New submitter Heart44 writes: A study in the British Medical Journal shows that consuming alcohol — any volume, any type — does not increase life expectancy. The full academic paper is not paywalled. From its conclusions: "Beneficial associations between low intensity alcohol consumption and all cause mortality may in part be attributable to inappropriate selection of a referent group and weak adjustment for confounders. Selection biases may also play a part." The associated editorial adds, "Firstly, in health as elsewhere, if something looks too good to be true, it should be treated with great caution. Secondly, health professionals should discourage suggestions that even low level alcohol use protects against cardiovascular disease and brings mortality benefits. Thirdly, health advice should come from health authorities, not from the alcohol industry, and, finally, the alcohol industry and its organizations should remove misleading references to health benefits from their information materials."

Comment: Hate to piss on the parade... (Score 2) 121

by SkunkPussy (#49028139) Attached to: VLC Acquiring Lots of New Features

...but its been missing some basic features for years (in the windows and android versions):

1) preserve playlist between invocations of the programme (playlist resets every time you close vlc)
2) preserve state of music library as soon as you make changes to it (add music to vlc library, don't close vlc, library never gets saved)

The Internet

The Man Squatting On Millions of Dollars Worth of Domain Names 175

Posted by timothy
from the your-name-here dept.
Jason Koebler writes For the last 21 years, Gary Millin and his colleagues at World Accelerator have been slowly accumulating a veritable treasure trove of seemingly premium generic domain names. For instance, Millin owns, has sold, or has bartered away world.com, usa.com, doctor.com, lawyer.com, comic.com, email.com, cyberservices.com, and more than 1,000 other domain names that can be yours (including yours.com, which he owns), as long as you've got the startup idea to back it up. Millin doesn't sell domain names anymore, instead, he trades them to startups in exchange for a stake in the company.
Technology

Georgia State Univ. Art Project Causes 2nd Evacuation & Bomb Squad Call 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the so-nice-they-did-it-twice dept.
McGruber writes The same Georgia State University art project responsible for Monday's shutdown of Atlanta's Downtown Connector (Interstates 75 & 85), caused authorities in the south Fulton County, Georgia town of Hapeville to evacuate businesses and call in a bomb squad Tuesday.

According to Georgia State University spokesman Don Hale, the devices are pinhole camera being used in a solargraphy project to track the rising and setting of the sun over a three-month period. "Students were instructed to take their cameras home and to place them in locations that would provide interesting scenes with bright sunlight," Hale said. "The locations were selected by the students."

It was up to each of the 18 students in the class to find a spot for their own project, the university said. The university was made aware of the art project Tuesday morning and, through its police department, immediately informed the Atlanta Police Department, Hale said.

Comment: Re:The "definition of broadband" did NOT change. (Score 1) 430

by SkunkPussy (#48938427) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

This is one time where survivorship bias is not a flaw. If someone who got elected says it costs this much, then it probably did. We don't hear from all the people who spent less, *because they failed to get elected*!

Personally I think at least part of government should be drawn by lot (a la jury service), as elections really devolve to a spending contest, despite being at least theoretically democratic.

Comment: Re:What are the practical results of this? (Score 1) 430

by SkunkPussy (#48938407) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

In the UK we have had majority governments formed from one of two parties for decades. At the last election (and almost certainly at the upcoming one) we had for the first time a coalition government where one of the main 2 parties had to team up with a minority party in order to form a government. This is a big improvement as by being forced to compromise with the minority party, the larger party has had to same some of its more extreme instincts.

There is no reason it couldn't also happen in the USA. However if you convince yourself that it can never happen (and worse convince others that this is the case), then maybe it won't.

"Freedom is still the most radical idea of all." -- Nathaniel Branden

Working...