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Comment Checking the wrong thing in a not great place? (Score 1) 136 136

First up lkml.org is a third party site that hosts Linux kernel mailing list archives on a website. Regular Linux kernel mail isn't actually sent from it (I believe that's done by vger) so we're looking up the email reputation for the wrong IP...

Secondly UCEPROTECT is a very aggressive blacklist which states upfront they will block people who they believe are in the vicinity of people who the judge to be sending them spam. It's not the be and end all though and on one server I looked some time ago it's effectiveness was surpassed by other blacklists (here's someone else's old DNS blacklist comparison for 2014). In general I prefer more conservative tools like senderbase when trying to work out an IPs mail reputation.

For what it's worth I've also seen GMail incorrectly mark mails sent to the fio mailing list (which is also managed by vger) as spam and in that case it was purely down to mail being proxied through the list which was a place that didn't match the sender's DMARC records. Most of the time GMail was getting the marking of spam right though (even for mailing list mails)...

Comment Article author wasn't using queued TRIM (Score 1) 182 182

The article now contains an update stating that queued TRIM was not involved (that ordinary TRIM was to blame is also mentioned in the author's Hackers News comment) only ordinary TRIM. It also appears that the company's drives were enterprise Samsung PROs.

Comment systemd was in native mode for the first two (Score 1) 442 442

Anecdotes 1 + 2 were running in native mode because it was initially a fresh install that was then switched sysvinit-core. Anecdote 3 I don't know (most likely compatability mode as it was several years ago). Even if all the anecdotes were only running in compatibility mode the results show systemd finishing quicker...

Does the above make things any better and how fast do you expect things to go when you're bottlenecked on I/O throughput? Is 15 seconds for a hard disk or 4(!) seconds for a RAM disk so bad?

Comment Re:Systemd vs sysinit boot speed anecodote (Score 1) 442 442

The NFS mounts were always mounted at boot and not on demand both before and after systemd. The difference was that because there were multiple NFS mounts only proceeded in serial before the switch. After the switch the waiting of the mounts happened in parallel not just with each other but other services too. Yes it is entirely pathological but it really happened (and presumably other parallel inits would have solved it this way too).

For what it's worth I have an EeePC too. The default Xandros distro was a classic case of not running very much because it was highly custom (e.g. no printing, no mdns, kernel doesn't have to probe for all different kinds of hardware, hotplug of USB devices, io scheduler set to deadline etc) and thus was fast - I would always expect it to outperform a generic "full fat" Linux distribution. I'd expect your FreeBSD to beat my current XFCE Ubuntu setup too because I bet you can get start less. With lots of hand tweaks the boot speed to an XFCE desktop on my EeePC 900 is still 17 seconds...

Comment Systemd vs sysinit boot speed anecodote (Score 4, Informative) 442 442

Anecdote 1: I've just timed a Debian Jessie single CPU hard disk based VM install with BTRFS as the filesystem, a GNOME 3 desktop where the user is auto logged in boot and where an autostart script records the time. Here are my rough systemd and sysvinit results (times are from after the kernel core finished to when the GNOME script ran):
sysvinit (apt-get install sysvinit-core)
First boot: 20 seconds
Second boot: 18 seconds
Third boot: 19 seconds
systemd (apt-get remove sysvinit-core)
First boot: 15 seconds
Second boot: 16 seconds
Third boot: 15 seconds

sysvinit averages 19 seconds, systemd averages 15.33 seconds. In this case it does appear that systemd booted the system faster.

Anecdote 2: Same as above but where the VM's disk is sitting wholly in RAM. Time for sysvinit dropped to 5 seconds and the time for systemd dropped to 4 seconds.

My personal guess is that the more you are running, the slower the disk the more likely systemd is to benefit you. You don't say how you did your comparison though or what type your "disks" were. If your comparison was between different versions of Linux distro then it could simply be that the previous version did less (which is always the fastest way to boot)...

Another anecdote: a few years back I saw Slackware systems at a University converted over to systemd. Boot times (which involved waiting for multiple NFS mounts) went from over three minutes to down to less than a minute because more of the waiting was done in parallel.

Comment Unusual way of looking at it (Score 1) 162 162

While my interaction with storage is "how long did it take for this operation to finish" the answer to that can vary dramatically on a hard disk depending on type and frequency of I/O I was doing (whereas the difference between best and worst values narrows with flash).

Your table doesn't capture the difference in wait time between reading only reading a 1GByte ISO in big chunks that's been laid out sequentially and serving up multiple torrents from big files that are over different parts of the disk simultaneously. You aren't always in the worst case and if the data is already cached in RAM you may be totally unable to perceive a difference because the waiting was decoupled from the request.

Telling people that "wait time" describes what they're seeing feels like it's trying to push latency and throughput into one number when both need to be distributions describing particular patterns of (potentially parallel) I/O and that's not even getting into queue depth. I guess there are parallels to telling people to describe things in terms of load average too...

Comment "Google Now" and "OK Google" are different (Score 1) 35 35

If you have an appropriate Android device Google Now will (apparently) display information based on your current context (e.g. if your phone learns where work and home are it might display information about traffic jams on the route home around the time it believes you will be traveling). You need a logged in Google account to use this feature.

OK Google is a way of using your voice to interact with your device (or Chrome web browser). So if I have the appropriate phone and it's been set to listen I can say "OK Google" and it will activate an app/mode where it will accept further voice input. On the Android phone I saw (and in my Chrome web browser on OS X) I can then ask it "What's the weather like?" and it pops up some weather related information and speaks back "It's ten degrees in ". Sometimes when you ask it questions just does a web search other times (on the device) it would start applications (e.g. mail) and so on. You do not need to be logged into Google to use this feature.

Comment It's possible to beat good testing... (Score 1) 169 169

...but not without a price. If you can mathematically construct your program then you can prove that it is free from defects providing enough assumptions hold (the specification is correct, the tools used to build it are correct, the proof of correctness is correct, you had enough money/time/skill to do the process etc). For the time being, it's not possible to formally most programs that have already been written in mainstream languages so other techniques like testing will remain useful tools.

"Why waste negative entropy on comments, when you could use the same entropy to create bugs instead?" -- Steve Elias

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