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Comment: Re:Small setup (Score 1) 287

by SirCowMan (#47945141) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?
There is a fellow below with 3 kids and grandparents visiting, I'm with him - a single AP can't handle the traffic, certainly not in a high RF area. I've wired as much as I can in.

I use an 8-port head switch to break off IP-TV & internet onto seperate VLAN's, an older quad-WAN router for routing/firewall/VPN/etc, and a 16 port switch which serves as the main hub for everything. There is a powerline network on a dedicated plug next to the powerbox, with cat6 cable runs off to a pair of branch 8-port switches which are now both full. There is another 5 port switch further down the line as well. I have 4 access points - 1xAC87U, 2xAC68U, and an older AC66U which covers a little dead spot in the library and give a few more ethernet sockets - all wired in, to cover the house with wifi.

For servers, I'm using an older PE2950 with 15 drives running FreeNAS and Plex. I have a newer 1U C1100 running ProxMox ~ for Active Directory, DNSMASQ, Squid, NTP, Zoneminder, Observium etc. I had an extensive setup for caching and ad-filtering from being on a slow and unstable satellite connection, now though on FTTH it's probably a bit overkill but all the same, no extra work to leave it running. It's all on a 1500VA 4U UPS. These are both wired in with bonded connections.

To keep the connection low-latency, high speed, and always available, I had to start wiring things in and move to a dedicated router and additional AP's. For reference, one AP held up to about 15 devices, by 25 on wireless streaming video started to drop-out, now I'm looking at roughly 60 devices (excluding networking gear) - so the more on wired, the better, not just for my network but for my neighbors as well.

The servers ... I had the opportunity to buy a rack worth of equipment complete with some software licenses out of a data center for little more than the cost of picking it up, so had to make use of some of it. Makes the basement a bit noisy though.

Comment: Re:What are you downloading? (Score 1) 355

by SirCowMan (#47771487) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What To Do About Repeated Internet Overbilling?
I'm on FTTH which includes IPTV, I seperate the VLAN's on a headswitch and use my own gear over the wireless router they provide. Given a heavy use of Netflix for kid shows, I sort of figured that would be the biggest bandwidth driver, but turns out the IPTV traffic absolutely dominates by raw numbers. 830 GB in the last roughly month is just IPTV streams, and that's with just the one box/PVR and kids off on summer vacations. Total traffic is over 1 TB. (The IPTV traffic is multicast though).

A point of history, had a short-lived 4G connection on an external antenna to grab a signal from a distant and marginal tower. It connect, but do so slowly and frequently disconnect. Had a bill for what was an impossible amount of data, even if it could stay up and maxed out 24/7 at the best indicated rate. I believe they were counting errors, retransmissions, etc., all those failed packets they'd see from their side as part of the total data amount, which there was a lot of.

Comment: Re:ex Mobil exec says fracking can't be done safel (Score 1) 95

by SirCowMan (#46839895) Attached to: Panel Says U.S. Not Ready For Inevitable Arctic Oil Spill
One of the restraining forces to arctic oil exploration and drilling is actually the shale gas depressing energy prices to the point where it is, relatively, not worth the investment to go north. If the shale gas boom collapses, then it will be profitable to get the oil and we'll see more projects happening, but there will be no fast and dirty about it. There is simply no infrastructure to facilitate anything but massive long-term projects which can afford to build that out - not just to run an operation, but to get it set up in the first place. There is also a lack of commodity technology to facilitate willy-nilly expansion, it needs to be bespoke (today), which means long design/construction/testing timelines.

Comment: Re:This is literally true (Score 1) 153

by SirCowMan (#46106717) Attached to: Facebook Puts 10,000 Blu-ray Discs In Low-Power Storage System
Facebook does the same thing, but it is not necessarily from archives of your emails etc., it may just be these suggested contacts have you on their android phone ... Or their own Gmail account. Your data may very well have been deleted, but you still exist as a sort of shadow account.

Comment: Re:Still won't fix monopolies (Score 1) 153

by SirCowMan (#45679727) Attached to: ITU Standardizes 1Gbps Over Copper, But Services Won't Come Until 2015
I don't have much problem with Xpolorenet itself, though they do get raked over the coals by those who don't appreciate the nature of satellite service. This '4G Satellite' launched relatively recently with much greater capacity than what's been available before (one shot it doubled north america's total available bandwidth from space), but satellite availability is dependent on 'spot beams' and this 4G one aims mostly at people who will have other options. Most places in Canada where satellite is the only option altogether will be on the telestat satellite, whose traffic management policy is here: http://www.xplornet.com/traffic-management/telesat-ka/

The 3mpbs packages, all except the slowest, were upped to 5mbps in August. Based on the traffic policy link it seems they have also doubled the amount you can transfer before 'recovery mode'. It had actually been getting better, as they have switched as many people as possible onto the new ("4G") satellite, as well as to terrestrial wireless. I can't speak for the new satellite myself, it was never available here, but definitely I'd take reliable low-latency ~500-700kpbs connection with all the ATM overhead over the old-timey telesat 3-5mbps satellite connection which spends most of the time @ 3% (150kbps)!!!

One thing I will give to Xplorenet - despite throttling, there is no caps. That was enough to switch from Telus with their huge overage charges (had one bill in the $1000 range) or later the hard caps (service would cut out entirely at 5GB/mo); If you have a computer system or two with automatic OS updates (or other auto-updating software: i.e., chrome, firefox, flash, java...) and a cloud enabled cell-phone (Android, iOs) or two, a cap dwindles fast should a few updates coincide within a given month.

Comment: Re:Still won't fix monopolies (Score 3, Informative) 153

by SirCowMan (#45675639) Attached to: ITU Standardizes 1Gbps Over Copper, But Services Won't Come Until 2015
It's not a deal, just switched to dsl from this. There is a $3-400 setup charge, contracts run typically 3 years, and it's $25/mo or so penalty to break early. Which probably would be okay if you saw those speeds. Have a look at their throttling policy, after 55mb you'll see about 3% of this for the next few hours. Also, many things are blocked or effectively blocked until 2 or 3 am ... Such as Apple authentication servers. If you have say, an Apple TV it won't be able to access iTunes libraries on your Mac due to this. That latency... For something like Slashdot, not an issue, but ads or media streams like Facebook will open hundreds of connections to CDNs to get images etc., which compounds the effect of delay, particularly where multiple DNS resolutions are required. I used an aggressive squid proxy and dnsmasq, both setup with ad filtering to make it useable. The service would be alright for those who live rurally and understand the limits of satellite, but the throttling and filtering of services makes it a viable option only for the most remote and desperate.

Comment: Re:Wow! Just like ... (Score 1) 43

by SirCowMan (#44783059) Attached to: New Ship Will Remain Stable By Creating Its Own Inner Waves
In the old days, yes, fuel tanks would be afterwards filled with water and used as ballast, with obvious environmental consequence. There will be a bit of water in ships which use residual fuel, it goes through a seperator before use. Some modern vesssels still mix use fuel and ballast in the same tank to maintain a constant displacement, i.e., naval vessels, though where still done they are seperated by a rubber bladder inside the tank.

Comment: Re:SWATH doesn't require power (Score 1) 43

by SirCowMan (#44783035) Attached to: New Ship Will Remain Stable By Creating Its Own Inner Waves
SWATH's make nice boats. The tradeoff is in the narrow hulls down to the pontoons - it's limiting not only from a tankage perspective, but also in terms of arranging the driveline and providing sufficient access. They require a wide footprint to provide adequate stability, and like an oil rig, must be very carefully considered for safety when damaged.

Comment: Re:Power requirements? (Score 1) 43

by SirCowMan (#44783015) Attached to: New Ship Will Remain Stable By Creating Its Own Inner Waves
The volume of water will be on order of 2% of the vessels overall weight, so yes it will be a massive amount of weight. Most of the roll-dampening is provided by the hull's natural resistance to roll and the center of mass of the vessel typically being low. This system itself works not by moving the water per-se, but by controlling the natural roll of the water within the U-shaped tank to counteract that motion. By adjusting the air valves, the natural frequency of the tank can be modified (the response curve flattens out). Otherwise, the tanks or combination of tanks are selected to match the natural roll period of the vessel.

Comment: Re:It's much older than that... (Score 2) 43

by SirCowMan (#44782985) Attached to: New Ship Will Remain Stable By Creating Its Own Inner Waves
They certainly are used used today and practical, though the are also somewhat dangerous if not operated with due regard to their ability to increase a ships chance of capsize. In addition to the anti-roll tanks in the Wikipedia article, there are also 'heeling tanks' - large ballast tanks with oversized bilge pumps used primarily in icebreakers to rock them as they transit through ice, though they are not intended to offset a rolling motion. For a vessel where motion control is imperative, such as a research vessel, two controlled tanks might be fitted to react to a larger range of ships self-displacement and wave frequencies. This can be in addition to what you're more like to see on a yacht - active fin control - as fins require forward speed to be effective, anti-roll tanks do not. The basics of this concept were hashed out pretty well by the 1960's ... though today's control systems are more advanced, can be predicted (rather than reactive) by monitoring the oceans surface, and the reaction of the tank can be better modelled through CFD programs as there is inevitably structural elements through the duct which affect the tanks operation. Having just read the article, no, this is not news. There are commercial outfits who will provide the entire system, turn-key, if the tanks are accounted for in the vessels design.

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