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Comment: social intelligence enhancer (Score 2) 456

by Silvermistshadow (#43215313) Attached to: If I could augment my senses (w/ implant or similar) ...
Think of all the money it'd make. Plus suddenly socially awkward people would know exactly when and how to enter a conversation, and can thus make themselves more productive. And then we could all stop browsing this site and get something done, like programming software for a social intelligence enhancer. Which is about as social as anyone who visits this site gets.

Comment: Re:Good one (Score 1) 1142

Your fallacy is thinking Time is linear. Time is non-linear. It does not exist at the meta-physical level. Time is a *dimension* of mind. After you die will finally grok these concepts, so don't worry about it if you don't "get it" while human - most people don't.

But is Time wibbly-wobbly?

Comment: Re:Good one (Score 1) 1142

So why does god get a free pass to come from nothing?

He doesn't. If he exists, it's somewhere outside this universe- somewhere we can't see, since the light from anywhere outside the universe will probably never reach us (something about being inside a giant bubble or whatever). To be honest, I pulled that theory straight out of my ass, so I'm not going to defend it at all.

Comment: Re:Counter Measures? (Score 2) 193

by Silvermistshadow (#39980545) Attached to: Britain Bringing Out 'Sonic Gun' For Olympics Security
My personal experience with combining earplugs and things vaguely similar to earmuffs is that the effect didn't seem to stack. I put the earplugs in first, then the earmuffs, and there was no difference between having the earmuffs on and off as far as mitigating the noise of people talking. I do have to wonder if >33dB is considered a normal talking volume for an indoor environment, or if perhaps the rest is just conducting through my skull.

+ - MPAA Releases New Report: Nobody Has Ever Pirated an Eddie Murphy Movie->

Submitted by
amarx
amarx writes "After years of unsuccessfully fighting video piracy around the world, the Motion Picture Association of America is convinced it has finally come up with a solution to stop it once and for all: Only make movies starring Eddie Murphy. An exhaustive study recently commissioned by the MPAA proved conclusively that while piracy of Hollywood movies has seen a dramatic increase, the same cannot be said for films starring Murphy."
Link to Original Source

+ - Growing Organ Market Targets Desperate Poor

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Impoverished people in developing countries are increasingly being targeted and 'exploited' in the growing black market trade of human organs, according to a paper published in the Medical Anthropology Quarterly.

A decade-long study detailing the experiences of people who were victims of flourishing worldwide market for body parts like kidneys, liver parts and corneas, found that these individuals are often manipulated by unethical brokers and organ recipients."

+ - Algorithm Brings Speedier, Safer CT Scans->

Submitted by kenekaplan
kenekaplan (2426100) writes "Standard CT scanners can generate images of patient's body in less than five minutes today, but the radiation dose can be equal to about 70 chest X-rays. Lower powered CT scans can be used in non-emergency situations, but it can take more than 4 days to produce those images. Intel and GE created an algorithm that speeds up a computer's ability to process the low radiation dose scans by 100x, from 100 hours per image to 1 hour."
Link to Original Source
Government

+ - Know your rights: Identity theft victim challenges->

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "Unwanted pressure to buy protection services from credit reporting agencies and the inability to speak to a live person when reporting an identity theft situation were the two most annoying issues victims identified in a Federal Trade Commission report issued on the growing problem this week. The FTC issued a report summarizing the results of a survey of identity theft victims who were asked to describe their experiences dealing with consumer reporting agencies and, more generally, exercising their rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)/Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA), to recover from identity theft."
Link to Original Source
China

+ - 300m Chinese High-Speed Rail Section Collapses->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The state-run Xinhua news agency and other local media said on Monday that a 300-meter (984 feet) section of a high-speed rail line intended to connect the Yangtze River cities of Wuhan and Yichang collapsed on Friday, apparently following heavy rain. The collapse, which occurred near the city of Qianjiang in China's Hubei province, happened on a rail line that had already undergone test runs.

The reports mentioned no casualties."

Link to Original Source
Biotech

+ - Gamers outdo computers at DNA sequence alignments->

Submitted by ananyo
ananyo (2519492) writes "In another victory for crowdsourcing, gamers playing Phylo (http://phylo.cs.mcgill.ca/) have beaten a state-of-the-art program at aligning regions of 521 disease-associated genes form different species (http://www.nature.com/news/gamers-outdo-computers-at-matching-up-disease-genes-1.10203).
The 'multiple sequence alignment problem' refers to the difficulty of aligning roughly similar sequences of DNA in genes common to many species (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sequence_alignment). DNA sequences that are conserved across species may play an important role in the ultimate function of that particular gene. But with thousands of genomes likely to be sequenced in the next few years, sequence alignment will only become more difficult in future.
Researchers now report that players of Phylo have produced roughly 350,000 solutions to various multiple sequence alignment problems, beating the accuracy of alignments from a program in roughly 70% of the sequences they manipulated (paper http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0031362)."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Yeah creationist ? (Score 1) 267

by Silvermistshadow (#37889582) Attached to: Fish Evolve Immunity To Toxic Sludge
"I've actually never, ever, met a creationist who would even admit that they might be wrong. And that says it all, really." I admit that I might be wrong. Often enough I am, and it is the ability to learn from being wrong that separates me (and perhaps a few others) from zealots. Others would just make up psuedoscience to get around the fact that they're wrong. Evolution has enough proof for itself that I think it is true. I am willing to accept any answers science can give, as long as they are proven. In the end, I might even go with the Creed: "Nothing is true, everything is permitted."

What this country needs is a dime that will buy a good five-cent bagel.

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