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Comment: Re:This is why... (Score 1) 175

by Sillygates (#33258288) Attached to: The Hidden Security Risk of Geotags
But, if they can better pinpoint your location to a few meters, they can start trying to send you spam in the mail, or, maybe even sell your information to those people search sites. More metrics always helps. It can even work to become a stronger confirmation of your location, if your IP and geotags all match.

Comment: Re:Some quick math says... (Score 1) 359

by Sillygates (#32836378) Attached to: Company Builds Fast Charging Station For Electric Cars

This thing is putting nearly a quarter megawatt (240kw) drain on the power grid during use.

The quick charging station probably has some sort of means to store charge (e.g. large capacitors [boron/carbon nanotube supercapacitors?]), which can be charged over a great amount of time, and then quickly dissipated in to the automobile.

Comment: Bad Summary (Score -1) 205

by Sillygates (#32794984) Attached to: The Curious Case of SSD Performance In OS X
The thing about TRIM is that its to help the wear-leveling on the drive, not the data throughput performance (TRIM does nothing to guarantee consecutive blocks, etc....It actually would likely cause more fragmentation, because what the system sees as consecutive logical blocks could be reallocated several times on different portions of the disk, creating an extra layer of fragmentation that the OS isn't even aware of).

Even without TRIM you should expect similar performance characteristics until the cells in a specific region of the drive start to fail, because the drive doesn't know when its safe to reclaim blocks for the wear-leveling-- To have any wear leveling at all without TRIM the drive must actually set aside blocks, making it so that the user doesn't see all of the available space on the drive (when a block is rewritten, the drive can allocate a block elsewhere from the pool of free physical blocks, and then assign the old block to the pool of free blocks).
Data Storage

The Curious Case of SSD Performance In OS X 205

Posted by timothy
from the and-mysteriouser dept.
mr_sifter writes "As we've seen from previous coverage, TRIM support is vital to help SSDs maintain performance over extended periods of time — while Microsoft and the SSD manufacturers have publicized its inclusion in Windows 7, Apple has been silent on whether OS X will support it. bit-tech decided to see how SSD performance in OS X is affected by extended use — and the results, at least with the Macbook Air, are startling. The drive doesn't seem to suffer very much at all, even after huge amounts of data have been written to it."

Comment: Re:Leave Canada Alone (Score 3, Informative) 187

by Sillygates (#32389976) Attached to: How CDNs and Alternative DNS Services Combine For Higher Latency
This still violates the DNS specification, and there is no way to effectively turn it off. Why is this a problem? Please see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS_hijacking#Use_by_ISPs .

For this reason I use Internet2, Level 3's (4.2.2.2 - 4.2.2.4), and now google's dns servers.
Communications

If ET Calls, Who Speaks For Humanity? 371

Posted by timothy
from the your-call-is-very-important-to-us dept.
EagleHasLanded writes "Who speaks for humankind if ET calls on us? Paul Davies, chairman of the SETI Post-Detection Taskgroup, is a likely ambassador. But Allen Tough founded the Invitation to ETI Web site, which encourages ET to make contact via email (and also strongly discourages humans from impersonating ET). But an individual in the UK got over some of the hurdles designed to weed out hoaxers, before finally throwing in the towel."
Cellphones

BlackBerry Bold Tops Radiation Ranking 189

Posted by timothy
from the woo-top-of-the-list-awesome dept.
geek4 writes with this excerpt from eWeek Europe: "Data from the Environmental Working Group places the BlackBerry Bold 9700 as the mobile device with the highest legal levels of cell phone radiation among popular smartphones. Research In Motion's BlackBerry Bold 9700 scores the highest among popular smartphones for exposing users to the highest legal levels of cell phone radiation, according to the latest 2010 Environmental Working Group ranking. Following the Bold 9700 are the Motorola Droid, the LG Chocolate and Google's HTC Nexus One. The rankings still put the phones well within federal guidelines and rules."
Operating Systems

Which Linux For Non-Techie Windows Users? 766

Posted by Soulskill
from the first-one's-free dept.
obarthelemy writes "Having at last gotten Linux to run satisfactorily on my own PCs, I'd now like to start transitioning friends and family from XP to Linux instead of Windows 7. The catch is that these guys don't understand or care much about computers, so the transition has to be as seamless and painless as possible. Actually, they won't care for new things; even the upcoming upgrade to Windows 7 would be a pain and a bother, which is a great opportunity for Linux. I'm not too concerned about software (most of them only need browser, IM, VLC, mail and a Powerpoint viewer for all those fascinating attachments). What I'm concerned about is OS look-and-feel and interface — system bar on the bottom with clock, trash, info on the right, menu on the left, menu items similar to those of Windows. Is it better to shoot for a very targeted distro? Which would you recommend? Are there themes/skins for mainstream distributions instead? I've been looking around the web, and it's hard to gauge which distros are well-done and reasonably active."

Comment: Re:Define "consumable" (Score 1) 240

by Sillygates (#31128890) Attached to: A Printer That Uses No Consumables

Yeah, they're re-usable. But if it's stuck in a filing cabinet then you can't re-use it now can you.

And, even in a good office, I'd be amazed if even half of them got recycled into the system, and not lost/thrown away.

Confidential documents?
* Recovery of the last print might be possible?
* It's a pain to erase the pages (refeeding into an appliance)

The Internet

Verizon Blocking 4chan 677

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the and-nothing-of-value-was-lost dept.
An anonymous reader writes "According to 4chan's owner and administrator 'moot,' Verizon has explicitly blocked all traffic on their network from boards.4chan.org, where all of 4chan's boards are located. Moot explains that only traffic to and from port 80 is being dropped and they were able to confirm that it was intentional. 4chan's downtime for Verizon users has been in effect for at least 72 hours since Saturday, February 7."
Power

Physicists Discover How To Teleport Energy 365

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the scott-me-up-beamy dept.
MikeChino writes "A physicist at Tohoku University in Japan has figured out how to teleport energy from one point in the universe to another. The technique is based upon prior research that shows it's possible to teleport information from one location to another, and involves making a measurement on each [of] an entangled pair of particles. The measurement on the first particle injects quantum energy into the system, and then by carefully choosing the measurement to do so on the second particle, it is possible to extract the original energy. Heady stuff, but essentially it means that you can inject energy at one point in the universe and extract it from somewhere else without changing the energy of the system as a whole."

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