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Comment: Mainstream? So what? (Score 1) 320

by SilkBD (#35062582) Attached to: Geek Culture Will Never Die...or Be Popular
I pose this response: Who gives a crap?

I'm a geek, i'm a programmer who loves sci-fi, quantum physics, learning as much about everything as possible (especially anything related to science), I was there when l33t speak was invented by my geek "friends".... and, godamnit, I love Tron.

And once again, I ask, who gives a crap. What I like is not influenced by what the mainstream like other than the fact that usually the mainstream destroys the integrity of what I used to like...

I'm a geek and i always will be until I upload my consciousness to the internet hive brain and merge with the source.
Google

Google Buzz — First Reactions 310

Posted by kdawson
from the what-it-is dept.
Google announced Buzz today, as we anticipated this morning. CNET has a workmanlike description of the social-networking service, which is integrated into gmail. CNET identifies a central obstacle Buzz will have to overcome to gain traction: "The problem, however, will be the increasing backlash Google is seeing from the general public over how much data the company already controls on their online habits." Buzz is being rolled out over the next few days so some people will see a Buzz folder in their gmail, but most won't yet (this Twitter post explains how Safari users can get an early glimpse). A blog posting up at O'Reilly Answers points out some of the distinguishing characteristics of Google Buzz — one interesting one being its ability to post an update either publicly or privately, at the user's option. This design choice places it between the public-by-default Twitter and the private-by-default Facebook. Lauren Weinstein sounds a note of caution about the inherent privacy risks of Google's method of filling out initial friend profiles by automatic friending.
Biotech

Re-Engineering the Immune System 175

Posted by kdawson
from the immunity-two-point-oh dept.
destinyland notes a microbiology professor describing "Immunity on Demand" (or "Immunity 2.0") and wonders whether we could genetically engineer all the antibodies we need. "...there's a good chance this system, or something like it, will actually be in place within decades. Caltech scientists have already engineered stem cells into B cells that produce HIV-fighting antibodies — and an NIH researcher engineered T cells that recognize tumors which has already had promising clinical trials again skin cancer. Our best hope may be to cut out the middleman. Rather than merely hoping that the vaccine will indirectly lead to the antibody an individual needs, imagine if we could genetically engineer these antibodies and make them available as needed?"

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