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Comment: Not if you're global... (Score 2) 126

by rsilvergun (#47933945) Attached to: Use of Forced Labor "Systemic" In Malaysian IT Manufacturing
the real capitalists are global. They benefit from us competing with cheaper labor. Marx predicted this but all anyone can remember about him is that a few dictators used his books for rhetoric.

As for Adam Smith, he actually as against this sort of naked capitalism. He wrote at a time of small merchant artisans. He didn't see the industrial revolution coming and if he had probably wouldn't have written the books he did. These days he's like Marx: all anybody remembers about him is what fits in with what they want.

Comment: Um... huh? (Score 2) 126

by rsilvergun (#47933931) Attached to: Use of Forced Labor "Systemic" In Malaysian IT Manufacturing
Slaves were very expensive compared to immigrants. With immigrants you could treat them just as bad and when they got weak move on to the next batch. With slaves you had money sunk in. The south also had huge amounts of capital sunk into slaves. If you're selling someone's buying, and that costs money. It's one of the reasons they were so far behind the curve on the industrial revolution...

Comment: Naw, it's just profits (Score 1) 126

by rsilvergun (#47932783) Attached to: Use of Forced Labor "Systemic" In Malaysian IT Manufacturing
Motorola built a factory in the states and did just fine. They only moved it over seas because slave labor is still cheaper, but they were plenty profitable and selling the phones for competitive prices.

I've been filling the head of a good friend of mine with liberalism and it prompted his Dad to ask "What do you have against Profit". This. This is what I have against profit. It's _never_ enough.

Comment: Re:The real action will be elsewhere. (Score 1) 322

by afidel (#47932173) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

Nissan Leaf would go from 25K to 18K
Or, much more likely it would be available for $18k with the current range or $25k with double the range. In fact Nissan is seriously talking to existing owners about how much they would be willing to pay for a model with double the range as they see Tesla coming down range at them.

Comment: Re:What they dont tell you ... (Score 1) 322

by afidel (#47932097) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

VS what, a car from the 1970's? Everything from the mid 80's on is a complete fender replacement in the case of an accident. It's the price we pay for fuel economy. Heck, many fairly minor accidents result in the vehicle being totaled due to crumple zones, that's the price we pay for safety. In both cases it's a minor percentage of the total cost of the vehicle fleet.

Comment: Re:No (Score 1, Insightful) 322

by wickerprints (#47930965) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

You must be some paid shill, because that wasn't even REMOTELY the point of the GP post. The point is that the existing cost of the Tesla Model S already hits Anderman's price range, so the Model 3, being smaller and another three years out from now to improve battery manufacturing costs, should easily sell for a lower price point. But you wouldn't understand because you need it explained in one-syllable words, written in crayon.

Comment: Re:Still pretty affordable (Score 1) 322

by afidel (#47930349) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

The tax credit is there to jump start the industry, and there are per manufacturer and total vehicles sold caps on the credit, compared to all the perpetual credits for the oil and gas industry that's actually extremely progressive.Oh, and you can buy a Nissan Leaf and take full advantage of the credit without being anything approaching "Rich".

Comment: Re:Still pretty affordable (Score 2, Informative) 322

by afidel (#47930317) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

Thing is, in California electricity costs almost the same as gas

The top tier with southern california edison is $0.32/KWhr so filling the top capacity model S costs $27.20 and gives you a 300 mile range for a cost per mile of $.09. The average price of gas in southern California is currently ~$3.50 so to match the Tesla you'd have to achieve ~38MPG, which is quite a bit better than the 740i achieves, probably the most comparable vehicle to the Model S. Heck, the most fuel efficient large BMW in the US, the 535d, only achieves 30MPG combined. This also neglects the fact that if you have the money for a Model S you can afford to put up solar panels to avoid falling into that top tier of consumption so your real cost per mile could be significantly lower.

Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of everything and the Wirth of nothing?

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