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Comment: Re:what about bans on private competition (overbui (Score 1) 160

by Shuh (#48856111) Attached to: A State-By-State Guide To Restrictive Community Broadband Laws

Citizens: Well, internet is better and now I have more choices.

Politicians: Death panels! Terroist fistbumps! Benghazi!

Obama: Internet access is the right of every American. If you don't buy an approved Internet Access Plan from the state exchange, say hello to my little frenz at the IRS.

Comment: Re:Just reclassify them (Score 2, Insightful) 81

by Shuh (#48724961) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

It is easier to reclassify the broadband companies than to get them to play nice with the Internet. If there is REAL competition, they will get in line, because some new start-up can quickly state they have 'true' Net Neutrality.

Ironically you may have have hit on the real reason for passing Net Neutrality. The feelgood parts of the regulation touted on /. will be toothless. Meanwhile the fine print of the regulation will outlaw new start-ups and anything else approaching "REAL competition."

Comment: Re:when-all-the-astroturfing-is-accounted-for dept (Score 4, Informative) 81

by Shuh (#48724745) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

It might be better that way. I know I can't out-bid $MEGACORP on the Congressperson-purchasing market, err I mean campaign contribution donations. Unlike letting Congress handle this, there's actually a chance some random bureaucrat will do the right thing. A slim chance, yes, but a chance.

This /. story about a "vote" tries to make this agreement among bureaucrats look like something other than an executive fiat from a single Hugo Chavez. The idea is to convince you the representative democratic process is involved somehow. But rather than pick up on that, you seem to think it's more expensive to buy off half of a handful of regulators than to buy off most of Congress.

The only big problem with the FCC scenario is the standard revolving door between the regulators and future cushy jobs in the very industry they're supposed to be regulating.

So it's better to have bureaucrats handling everything, except for the fact that bureaucrats regularly come from and return to the industries they regulate and can be bought off rather easily. Nice bit of reasoning there.

Comment: Re:I don't think so. (Score 1) 1128

by Shuh (#39518611) Attached to: Conservatives' Trust In Science Has Fallen Dramatically Since Mid-1970s

The other side of that argument is that science is telling folks that no, you can't use more than we've got forever, and yes, what you do is impacting other people. And some folks want any excuse to say, "So what. I only live once, screw the next generation, I want it all. Now!"

Math is telling the government that no, you can't spend more money than you've got forever, and yes, what it does is impacting other people. Some folks want any excuse to say, "So what. The government needs to 'help' everyone. Screw the next generation! The government needs more and more and more..."

Comment: Re:Americans (Score 1) 631

by Shuh (#38215514) Attached to: Why America Doesn't Need More Tech Giants Like Apple

A quick google search reveals the average manufacturing job in China pays $134 per month. It has little to do with laziness or stupid jobs, its simple economics.

The economics of the situation extends far beyond wages. Taxes, energy, distribution, and construction costs name a few. But perhaps the greatest cost to manufacture in America is the opportunity-lost-cost. If environmental regulations mean you have to wait months or even years to build a factory in America when you can break ground in China tomorrow, the decision on where manufacturing jobs go has already been made.

Comment: Re:FCC rules already struck down by Federal Courts (Score 1) 355

by Shuh (#38000466) Attached to: Obama To Veto Anti-Net-Neutrality Legislation
Mod parent up!

When the FCC redefined its own role by implementing the so-called Net Neutality rules, it did an end run around America's official representatives in Congress. As the OP noted, the courts have already ruled against a Federal bureaucracy assuming powers it can only be granted by the legislature. This veto, if there is one, can only be framed as Obama & the bureaucratic machine against the courts, the legislature, and the rule of law.

Comment: Mod parent up... (Score 1) 355

by Shuh (#38000446) Attached to: Obama To Veto Anti-Net-Neutrality Legislation
When the FCC redefined its own role by implementing the so-called Net Neutality rules, it did an end run around America's official representatives in Congress. As the OP noted, the courts have already ruled against a Federal bureaucracy assuming powers it can only be granted by the legislature. This veto, if there is one, can only be framed as Obama & the bureaucratic machine against the courts, the legislature, and the rule of law.

Comment: Re:Waiting for SSD price drop (Score 2) 79

by Shuh (#35385508) Attached to: Intel SSD 510 Series 6Gbps SATA Drives Tested
I just bought one of those for $229.99! I guess I should have known no sooner than I had installed the drive, Intel would come out with a brand new SSD and everything would be cheaper. Also OS X 10.7 with TRIM support is just around the corner. Oh well. This wasn't my first run-in with premature acquisition, and it probably won't be my last.

Comment: Re:It's simple. (Score 1) 453

by Shuh (#34745592) Attached to: Why Published Research Findings Are Often False
That there is warming may be your position. But that is not the position of the people being discussed.

Global Warming Theory espouses that not only is there some warming, but that man is the primary culprit in that warming, therefore a political dimension must be enacted to reign in man and his destructive habits. At this point "the science" around the AGW argument is largely found to be an exercise in confirmation bias (the subject of this thread).

In effect governments of the world have latched onto this warming idea and paid billions of dollars for "studies" that will justify their control of trillions of dollars. This cash and this motivation are at center of the pseudoscience bubble that's about to pop.

Comment: Re:Freedom doomed? (Score 1) 528

by Shuh (#34594062) Attached to: Republicans Create Rider To Stop Net Neutrality

Without net neutrality, the idea of open source governance may never even get a chance to work. Your very freedom is in serious jeopardy, since we are on the brink: do we go ahead and adopt totalitarianism-through-Facebook(etc) or try to move to freedom-through-distributed-governance?

*cough* *cough* *cah--bullsh1T1* *cahm-plete bullsh1T* *cough*

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