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Comment: Re:So, the other side? (Score 1) 297

by ShanghaiBill (#49804399) Attached to: Mandriva CEO: Employee Lawsuits Put Us Out of Business

France seems to be one extreme, but the US is the other extreme.

Neither France nor the US is anywhere near the extreme. Even within the EU, Greece and Italy are more dysfunctional than France. On the other side, half the countries in the world have fewer employment protections than America.

Comment: Re:So, the other side? (Score 5, Insightful) 297

by ShanghaiBill (#49803327) Attached to: Mandriva CEO: Employee Lawsuits Put Us Out of Business

this actually sounds pretty good to me!

Yes, it is good. Unless you are among the 11% unemployed, or one of the many millions with short term contracts because no one wants to take the risk of offering you a real job. But once you get the permanent position, you can kick back, because the penalty for firing you is prohibitive, resulting in poor productivity growth, and a stagnant economy. But, no problem, just borrow more euros from the hard working Germans across the Rhine.

Not all French people dream about a secure job with little work. I know several that are hardworking entrepreneurs, bursting with ideas. Unfortunately for France, they emigrated to America, and are my co-workers and neighbors here in San Jose, California.

California wine is better too.

Comment: Re:So, the other side? (Score 5, Interesting) 297

by ShanghaiBill (#49803071) Attached to: Mandriva CEO: Employee Lawsuits Put Us Out of Business

That's the lawyers. But the injured parties probably got some of their compensation. Maybe even all.

I once worked for a company that had an office in France. To get rid of an employee, you had to give them an extra year of pay, and even then, they could sue you for more, and probably win. If you own a company, and create jobs, the French consider you to be a criminal. There is a reason they have 11% unemployment.

Comment: Re:outrageous (Score 2) 296

by ShanghaiBill (#49802409) Attached to: Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Sentenced To Life In Prison

If someone is going away for life as it is there's very little reason to slap something else on him ...

... except he is "going away for life" precisely because of the accusations of "murder for hire", for which he was neither charged nor convicted. That is blatantly unconstitutional, and I hope this sentence is thrown out on appeal. A life sentence for providing an online marketplace is absurd.

Comment: Re:Hard Appeal to Counter (Score 2) 296

by ShanghaiBill (#49802283) Attached to: Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Sentenced To Life In Prison

Well That and given the number of transactions they can prove he was involved in... I'm sure it is thousands...

Would you prefer that those thousands of transactions occur on street corners? Or on school playgrounds? By moving these transactions to the privacy and safety of the web, he was providing a useful public service.

Comment: Re:Hard Appeal to Counter (Score 5, Insightful) 296

by ShanghaiBill (#49802257) Attached to: Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Sentenced To Life In Prison

I really fail to see what makes Ross Ulbricht any different from a regular drug dealer on the street

The difference is that he stood up to the man, and challenged the system. It is the same reason that in Russia or China, dissidents are punished more harshly than murderers. They are a threat to the system.

Comment: Re:outrageous (Score 1) 296

by ShanghaiBill (#49802239) Attached to: Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Sentenced To Life In Prison

I'm sure someone mass marketing the rape of millions across the internet ...

Rape involves non-consenting victims. In fact, it is the lack of consent that makes it rape.

... and attempting to have detractors killed would face a worse charge.

That is BS. If there was evidence that he had done that, he would have been charged, and the evidence presented at his trial.

Comment: Re:sourceforge significantly reduces crapware (Score -1, Flamebait) 53

Stories about that have been getting submitted over and over again since at least yesterday. Dice (which owns both Sourceforge and Slashdot) is suppressing them.

Perhaps. Another reason is that it is not news worthy, or not even true. I notice that neither you, nor the original AC, provide any external links, or any other information to substantiate your assertions. Why should anyone believe you?

Comment: Re:other people's money (Score 1) 361

So, what's your grief?

I have no grief. I think QE was the right thing to do, and it has worked far better than the austerity imposed in Europe. Also, I have a mortgage at 3.5% instead of 8%, which is putting an extra $1500 in my pocket every month for the next 30 years. No complaints from me.

Comment: Re:Pink? (Score 2) 61

by ShanghaiBill (#49801203) Attached to: MIT Trains Robots To Jump

If all the obstacles have to be pink to be detected that might be an issue.

Thousands of cars already have laser based obstacle detection that works in real time at highway speed. They work just fine with non-pink objects. They may have used pink in this instance just to make their image analysis easier. The color of the obstacles has no significance whatsoever to the basics of jumping and landing, and it is silly to fixate on that.

Comment: Re:Pink? (Score 2) 61

by ShanghaiBill (#49800359) Attached to: MIT Trains Robots To Jump

Is there a reason why all the obstacles are flat, low and pink?

Most likely because they already had some pink Styrofoam lying around.

Can the lasers only see pink objects?

Who cares? Obstacle detection with lasers is already a solved problem, and that was NOT the point of this research. The point is the algorithms and mechanism of jumping.

Comment: Re:in all fairness, (Score 1) 218

by ShanghaiBill (#49799765) Attached to: Chinese Nationals Accused of Taking SATs For Others

I think it is similar in reverse when Asians look at Caucasians?

It is not who you are, but who you spend time with, that determines this. If you are Caucasian, but grow up attending a school with lots of Asians, then you will have no problem telling them apart. I lived in Shanghai for several years, and when I first arrived, I had a hard time remembering faces. By the time I left, the neural nets in my brain's face recognition module had been reconfigured. Today, I live in San Jose (more Asians than whites) and I have no problem remembering faces.

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