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Comment: Re:Bullshit. (Score 4, Interesting) 697

by ShaggyZet (#40132587) Attached to: The Shortage of Women In IT

The problem with this statement is that historically and on average, female dominated industries (like nursing and teaching) don't pay as well as male dominated industries (like engineering). And when they start to, like nursing did a few years ago when there was a shortage, more and more men go into them.

There's nothing inherently wrong with this, it's the free market at work, but government contracting isn't the free market, for various reasons good and bad.

Comment: I/O (Score 1) 154

by ShaggyZet (#31800172) Attached to: Explaining Oracle's Sun Takeover — "For the Hardware"

First of all, the Sparc 1 was pretty ancient 10 years ago. In 2000, Sun was barely even selling anything but sun4u based machines. I think they still sold a few sun4m machines like the sparc 20, but it certainly wasn't state of the art.

In 2000, the technical reason you bought Sun or SGI over a Pentium III running Linux was the I/O subsystem. There were also political reasons, like you wanted VC. Remember, that was the height of the dot-com bubble, and it looked better when they toured your office to have a bunch of Sun stuff in the server room.

Yes, The Pentium III could run Seti@home just as fast as a Sun, but there was no comparison in the I/O subsystem, which was, and still is, what most servers need to do fast. Linux hardware RAID support was spotty at best. LVM existed, but wasn't as good a clone of Solaris as it is today. This was also pre-HyperTransport. PC (Intel and AMD) bus technology was years behind Sun/DEC/SGI in those days, the CPUs were fast, but they couldn't get data to them fast enough.

More recently, all that has changed. Every RAID vendor supports Linux, and most do it well. PC busses designed for servers use similar architectures to older unix servers, and have ramped up the speeds (Intel hired all the DEC engineers). A "PC" based server, engineered by a company that knows what they're doing (ie not some gamer building a server optimized for FPS) can definitely compete with anything out there on the technical level, and it's got the backing of real vendors behind it, which is needed in a corporate environment.

Comment: It could go a lot deeper (Score 3, Insightful) 171

by ShaggyZet (#31452156) Attached to: On Social Networks, You Are Who You Know

While the study proves a fairly obvious hypothesis, what your social network could say about you could go a lot deeper than that. It's not much of a leap to determine religion, politics, sexual orientation or various other things that people don't fully consider, or could even be used to violate equal opportunity housing or hiring laws. I think there are a lot of great things about social networking, and facebook in particular, but the how it's changing cultural views and expectations of privacy is shocking and fast, and I don't think we'll have perspective on whats happening for years to come.

Math

Man Uses Drake Equation To Explain Girlfriend Woes 538

Posted by samzenpus
from the less-math-more-social-science dept.
artemis67 writes "A man studying in London has taken a mathematical equation that predicts the possibility of alien life in the universe to explain why he can't find a girlfriend. Peter Backus, a native of Seattle and PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick, near London, in his paper, 'Why I don't have a girlfriend: An application of the Drake Equation to love in the UK,' used math to estimate the number of potential girlfriends in the UK. In describing the paper on the university Web site he wrote 'the results are not encouraging. The probability of finding love in the UK is only about 100 times better than the probability of finding intelligent life in our galaxy.'"
Image

Best Man Rigs Newlyweds' Bed To Tweet During Sex 272

Posted by samzenpus
from the nice-feed dept.
When an UK man was asked to be the best man at a friend's wedding he agreed that he would not pull any pranks before or during the ceremony. Now the groom wishes he had extended the agreement to after the blessed occasion as well. The best man snuck into the newlyweds' house while they were away on their honeymoon and placed a pressure-sensitive device under their mattress. The device now automatically tweets when the couple have sex. The updates include the length of activity and how vigorous the act was on a scale of 1-10.
Space

Big Dipper "Star" Actually a Sextuplet System 88

Posted by kdawson
from the toil-and-trouble dept.
Theosis sends word that an astronomer at the University of Rochester and his colleagues have made the surprise discovery that Alcor, one of the brightest stars in the Big Dipper, is actually two stars; and it is apparently gravitationally bound to the four-star Mizar system, making the whole group a sextuplet. This would make the Mizar-Alcor sextuplet the second-nearest such system known. The discovery is especially surprising because Alcor is one of the most studied stars in the sky. The Mizar-Alcor system has been involved in many "firsts" in the history of astronomy: "Benedetto Castelli, Galileo's protege and collaborator, first observed with a telescope that Mizar was not a single star in 1617, and Galileo observed it a week after hearing about this from Castelli, and noted it in his notebooks... Those two stars, called Mizar A and Mizar B, together with Alcor, in 1857 became the first binary stars ever photographed through a telescope. In 1890, Mizar A was discovered to itself be a binary, being the first binary to be discovered using spectroscopy. In 1908, spectroscopy revealed that Mizar B was also a pair of stars, making the group the first-known quintuple star system."

Comment: Re:Why not both? (Score 1) 289

by ShaggyZet (#30181752) Attached to: Some Claim Android App Store Worse Than iPhone's

All correct, though it wouldn't be realistic to run a Swing app targeted towards a "normal" screen and input devices anyway. The Android UI classes (and xml layout files) make writing an app targeted towards a small screen (or various sizes of small screens) much easier, so it seems like a reasonable trade off to me.

To make another comparison, Android's API is more like Java SE than Java ME is, which is kind of sad.

Comment: Re:Window management (Score 1) 344

by ShaggyZet (#29746045) Attached to: 10/GUI — an Interface For Multi-Touch Input

Yeah, this GUI doesn't seem to take into account the reason sophisticated users (ie people that don't maximize one window) have multiple windows open is that they /need/ multiple windows open, and they need to be able to arrange and size them so they can see all or at least a substantial subset at once. Handling the increasing number of windows that out day to day work requires (is this just me?) is something that current desktops are failing at, but 10/GUI's software doesn't seem better to me.

+ - Is the Higgs Boson sabotaging the LHC-> 1

Submitted by Maximum Prophet
Maximum Prophet (716608) writes "First it stopped the Superconducting Super Collider. Now it's throwing monkey wrenches into the Large Hadron Collider. It's the particle that doesn't want to be discovered.

This happened in the science fiction story, "Einstein's Bridge", now Holger Bech Nielsen, of the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Masao Ninomiya of the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics in Kyoto, Japan, are theorizing that it's happening in real life.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/13/science/space/13lhc.html?em"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Features (Score 1) 745

by ShaggyZet (#29181377) Attached to: Why the Google Android Phone Isn't Taking Off

A lot of posts are pointing to this feature, or that feature. The fact is, Android 1.0 was may be 50% done. 1.5 is starting to come out of beta. I was annoyed with Sprint when their CEO said that Android wasn't ready for prime time, but he may have been right. Maybe 2.0 will actually be something worth getting behind. I hope so, because I have a couple apps in the market and a couple more in the works.

The thing I find most ironic is the comparison between iPhone and Android. They both lack a lot of the same things, but for some reason Apple is being heavy handed, but with Google it just hasn't been implemented yet, which is somehow excusable. Calendar and Bluetooth APIs (prior to iPhone 3.0) are the best examples. Android doesn't have either of these, and in fact removed them from 1.0 even though they were in the betas. On either device, the end result for the developer and end user is the same. Want a calendars or events in your app? Write your own in a walled garden or require your users to hack their phones. But iPhone is at least making progress, gives developers reasonable early access, and keeps its promises.

Comment: Re:Open X Alliance (Score 1) 144

by ShaggyZet (#29153295) Attached to: Amazon, MS, and Yahoo Against Google's Library

Yeah, I wasn't sure where to put the ???. But, I think that "open" doesn't always mean "open" in the same sense that we'd all like it too. Mostly I was poking fun at Google's Open Handset Alliance, which may be "open", but at the end of the day has most of the same restrictions that the iPhone does in practical terms. But that's another topic entirely.

Unix

Maddog's New Hampshire "Unix" Plate Turns 20 212

Posted by timothy
from the like-a-1-letter-domain dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Local newspaper talks to Linux International's Jon 'maddog' Hall, who lives in New Hampshire, and who since 1989 has had a 'Live Free or Die' UNIX license plate — a real one, not a conference hand-out — on his Jeep. From the story: 'The day he installed the UNIX plates, he went early to work at DEC's office on Spit Brook Road in Nashua, to be sure to get the parking space right next to the door used by all the Unix engineers. He watched them come in and, one after another, do a double take at seeing the real-world version of the famous fake plate. "People would race in and yell, 'Who is it? Whose plate is it?!?'" Hall said. It was his then and it is his now. After 20 years, one suspects you will have to pry it from his cold, dead fingers.'"
Software

+ - Checked out Blender 3D lately? (v2.45 Released)-> 1

Submitted by
Apollos
Apollos writes "Open source software can be remarkable, and Blender 3D is no exception. This open source 3D modeling and animation package has been around quite a few years, but it is really getting mature; just check out the gallery at http://www.blender.org/features-gallery/gallery/images/. Version 2.45 has been released and can be downloaded at http://www.blender.org/download/get-blender/ Blender 2.45 contains advanced features such as subdivision surfaces, soft selection, a modifier stack, full skeletal rigging and animation including inverse kinematics and vertex weight painting (there's even a non-linear animation editor, vertex shape keys, and lattice deformations), UV mapping and unwrapping with seam based support and real-time on the fly unwrap editing mode, multiple shaders, a material node editor, a node based compositor that's even being used for keying effects, physics and particle system, raytracing, sub surface scattering (SSS); oh, and did I mention it has it's own built-in game engine? You can find the full feature list at http://www.blender.org/features-gallery/features/. Blender uses Python as a scripting engine so you can write your own importers and exporters, as well as extend and customize existing features. It runs on Linux, Mac, and Windows. If you're worried about the learning curve, there are loads of helps and tutorials, both web based and video; just search the web and they'll pop up everywhere. Here's a short list of websites featuring video tutorials: http://blender.org/, http://blendernewbies.blogspot.com/, http://blenderunderground.com/. There's also the main support site featuring all sorts of tutorial links, http://blenderartists.org/."
Link to Original Source

It isn't easy being the parent of a six-year-old. However, it's a pretty small price to pay for having somebody around the house who understands computers.

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