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Comment: Re:BB Pearl (Score 1) 348

by Shadow-isoHunt (#33877344) Attached to: iPhone 4 Screens Break 82% More Than 3GS
Yeah. It also crashes/reboots often when you try to use it with a microsd card in it, or attempt to use it as a mass storage device. Bluetooth tethering only works once per powercycle. The clit mouse likes to stop moving sometimes. I *hate* my pearl, but I also refuse to pay $300+ for another locked down handset from Verizon.

Comment: Re:This is a simple issue. (Score 1) 1695

by Shadow-isoHunt (#33521652) Attached to: Rackspace Shuts Down Quran-Burning Church's Sites
PS: "Hate crimes", victimless crimes, and then victimless "hate crimes" are bullshit. Law and legal process shouldn't discriminate in the very way that it's attempting to punish - that's just hypocritically asinine!

And don't forget people, freedom of speech is free until you start putting restrictions on it. People can still have free speech when no one will pay attention to their ramblings or grant them a venue, however.

Comment: This is a simple issue. (Score 1) 1695

by Shadow-isoHunt (#33521518) Attached to: Rackspace Shuts Down Quran-Burning Church's Sites
Like the topic says here, by my reasoning no principles have really been compromised here.

I defend the disconnect, because the douchebags broke the agreement of AUP. They agreed to their TOS when they bought their hosting plan. If they didn't read their TOS, their fault. These agreements can be as innocuous as IRCDs but they're generally decisions made as a matter of protection for the company against attack(legal, political, & digital) which can cripple the business and the service of other users. Read your TOS, find a host that's willing to put up with your needs. However,

I also support the douchebags here. They purchased their own qurans, and decided to burn them... what's the big deal about that? Just because someone's being an idiot doesn't mean you have to perpetuate it! You don't have to give them an outlet to spread their hateful message, and that's exactly the kind of decision that Rackspace is making here.

Comment: Re:I was just thinking about this today (Score 3, Informative) 175

by Shadow-isoHunt (#30678430) Attached to: FTC Worries About Consumers, Cloud Data, and Privacy
No, they cannot. GPS is one way, receiving timestamps via radio transmitted via multiple transmitters, then it does some fun maths involving the speed of light, and relativity. It requires the cellular link to transmit it's location to 911 via E911 services, but with the default firmware of your phone they can't remotely turn this on directly as it's not part of the E911 functionality. In order for them to turn it on remotely, they need to push a firmware patch to the handset which disables any GPS icon indications, and enables the vendor-specific command set. On top of that they have to figure out which handset is yours, which is going to be hard without an associated account with a valid GSM provider in your area. However, if they had previous knowledge of your IMEI/ESN, they could use that to locate you as IMEI/ESNs are globally unique to each GSM handset.

Also, the GPS is overkill since they can passively monitor your location via triangulation of your cellular link. This is the most likely method of monitoring, as it won't kill your battery life(tipping you off), it's passive requiring no interaction with the handset, it doesn't require the GPS chip to initialize and possibly download the GPS ephemeris if it's a cold start(which will take 40s minimum due to the 50bits/s).

Also, they could theoretically do it without a warrant if they used their _own_ equipment and knew your CDMA code - anyone can listen in to any radio transmission in the US, though decrypting a GSM/CDMA signal may be illegal. No decryption is necessary though, as long as they know your timeslot(GSM's tdm)/code(cdma).
The Internet

Contributors Leaving Wikipedia In Record Numbers 632

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the three-phases-of-web-sites dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "CNET reports that the volunteers who create Wikipedia's pages, check facts and adapt the site are abandoning Wikipedia in unprecedented numbers, with tens of thousands of editors going 'dead' — no longer actively contributing and updating the site — a trend many experts believe could threaten Wikipedia's future. In the first three months of 2009, the English-language version of Wikipedia suffered a net loss of 49,000 contributors, compared with a loss of about 4,900 during the same period in 2008. 'If you don't have enough people to take care of the project it could vanish quickly,' says Felipe Ortega at the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid, who created a computer system to analyze the editing history of more than three million active Wikipedia contributors in ten different languages. 'We're not in that situation yet. But eventually, if the negative trends follow, we could be in that situation.' Contributors are becoming disenchanted with the process of adding to the site, which is becoming increasingly difficult says Andrew Dalby, author of The World and Wikipedia: How We are Editing Reality and a regular editor of the site. 'There is an increase of bureaucracy and rules. Wikipedia grew because of the lack of rules. That has been forgotten. The rules are regarded as irritating and useless by many contributors.' Arguments over various articles have also taken their toll. 'Many people are getting burnt out when they have to debate about the contents of certain articles again and again,' adds Ortega."

The degree of technical confidence is inversely proportional to the level of management.

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