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Comment: Re:Linksys E3000 (Score 1) 334

by Shadow Labs (#38233370) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Flash-Friendly Router To Replace Aging WRT54GS?

I've been running dd-wrt on an e3000 and have been happy with it, great performance. After reading about tomato I think I'm going to reflash the router tonight and give it a try. My e3000 runs rather hot, I believe it was around 140F with a temp gun measured on the plastic case, perspective buyers be aware of that, I actually placed a netbook cooler under it as I was worried about burning it up on hot summer days. The dd-wrt forum I have not found to be friendly, I had general questions about issues with QoS policies that I think may have been firmware version related, but my thread kept getting deleted. Also, the update process for dd-wrt seems convoluted, where some articles explicitly state to flash with an initial flash firmware then the target firmware.

+1 recommendation for the e3000. I just recently purchased mine during an Amazon Black Friday lightning deal and am running TomatoUSB Ext on it. It's been working great for my Windows b/g/n laptop, a/b/g/n MacBook Pro, and b/g Wii (streaming Netflix and playing Mario Kart Wii).

I was initially worried about the numerous reports of the e3000 running hot, but I turned the Transmit Power setting down from a default of 42 mW to 24 mW on both the 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz radios. I haven't had any problems at all with heat since making the change and still get great coverage in both bands in my (small) house. The setting is under Advanced --> Wireless in TomatoUSB. Be sure to change it for both the 2.4 GHz/eth1 and the 5 GHz/eth2 interfaces. YMMV.

Security

+ - Medical Billing Firm Exposes 300k Individuals-> 1

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Southern California Medical-Legal Consultants, Inc. (SCMLC), a California company that represents medical providers in the recovery of billing from workers’ compensation insurance carriers, announced that data containing the names and social security numbers of approximately 300,000 individuals who have applied for California workers’ compensation benefits had been exposed to unauthorized access. SCMLC said it was notified of the exposed data by a security firm that discovered some of the files that had been indexed by Google.

SCMLC’s clients have included the largest hospital companies in the country as well as health insurers, HMO, large public hospitals, medical groups and union health trusts."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - LulzSec exposes 26,000 sex website passwords->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Passwords and email addresses of almost 26,000 members of adult website Pron.com have been released on the internet by the notorious hacking group LulzSec. To add to the victims' humiliation, LulzSec called on its followers to try the email/password combinations against Facebook, and tell friends and family of the users that they were subscribers to a pornographic website.

In addition LulzSec released passwords belonging to the administrators of dozens of other adult websites, and highlighted military and government email addresses that had signed up for the xxx-rated services."

Link to Original Source

+ - GPL wins in court.->

Submitted by fishthegeek
fishthegeek (943099) writes "The Software Freedom Conservancy has received a judgement against Westinghouse Digital Electronics for $90,000 in damages, $50,000 in costs plus a donation of all of the offending HDTV's that were using BusyBox in violation of the GPL. Given that WDE is nearly bankrupt it's likely that most if not all of the cash will disappear in a legal "poof", but it is a victory regardless."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:That's great. (Score 1) 145

by Shadow Labs (#31339138) Attached to: Over Half of Software Fails First Security Tests

Your viewpoint is a little close-minded. Most software written is never even sold. It is mainly in-house custom apps in companies where it would be pointless to try to exploit it because there are easier ways to get the data. And how about the software that runs completely closed on microcontrollers that are in every single product sold today?? Think before you post. :)

Your viewpoint is a little close-minded. Just because an app/server/system/whatever doesn't have sensitive data, that doesn't make it pointless to try to exploit. Ever hear of chained exploits? You break into system X, from there break into system Y, from there break into system Z, etc. until you finally get to your true target. Some little homegrown app that nobody gives 2 cents about (especially in regard to software/system security) because it houses no sensitive data may provide just the perfect platform for an attacker to do an initial exploit against. Now that they have their foot in the door, they can utilize that compromised system to launch their real attack that may not have been feasible otherwise. I've seen countless companies where important systems are relatively well defended against the outside and user segments of the network, but are not well defended against other server segments. Hop into the server segment via a poorly coded homegrown app, and you've just bypassed a big layer of many companies' defenses.

Comment: Re:We're not talking about the vague possible futu (Score 1) 297

by itsdapead (#30964890) Attached to: Amazon Pulls Book Publisher's Listings; Ebook Wars Underway?

Regardless, the two devices are not the same *now*

I think you're making the false assumption that people will find the iPad so hideously unusable as an ebook reader that it will outweigh the other things it can do.

apple could correct this by putting eInk on the bottom of the tablet and using the tilt sensor to determine whether to use "handy-web" mode or "power-saving book-reader" mode.

Please feel free to glue your Kindle to the back of your iPad, but here's a hint: don't apply for a job in Apple's design department :-)

Seriously, apart from the extra cost; the ergonomic problems of having a delicate display on both sides of the device; the need for a different user interface (and probably a whole new API and display manager) in ebook mode ("multitouch" depends on a responsive display) you're talking about investing R&D in a technology which will almost certainly be obsolete or confined to a niche with in a year or two.

My prediction: as soon as a "best of both worlds" display technology comes along that's up to Apple's standards, they'll use it. Sounds like the transflective display doesn't quite cut the image quality mustard yet, but its not vapour.

Comment: Re:I do it (Score 1) 1324

by pnewhook (#30963064) Attached to: US Grants Home Schooling German Family Political Asylum

No, he did not. He said that government should be responsible for securing your RIGHT to life, liberty, and property. There's a big difference. Bastiat NEVER would have expressed that government has any obligation to keep you alive, so the answer to your question is "yes, but it does not secure your RIGHT to life."

If its impossible to do your rights have been violated. You may have a right to cross the street but if there is a barricade preventing you to cross, then your rights have been violated.

Comment: Re:No story here (Score 1) 1324

by pnewhook (#30962986) Attached to: US Grants Home Schooling German Family Political Asylum

This view of yours ... it actually sounds a lot like a religion itself. And you assert it's right, and that those who disagree with it are wrong.

No. I do not have the arrogance to push my beliefs on anyone elses. As for other beliefs, I listen to what they believe and augment my own if I think it makes sense. I do not pass judgement on anyone elses religious beliefs, since I nor anyone else can positively know the true answer.

You do realize that islam and Christianity all came from Judaism? They all share a common 'old testament' for the lack of a better world?

ALL religions are talking about the same basic beliefs. There is no right or wrong when everyone is talking about the same thing but in different languages.

Comment: Re:No story here (Score 1) 1324

by pnewhook (#30959402) Attached to: US Grants Home Schooling German Family Political Asylum

There is no "right religion" to choose

False. Of course there is.

FALSE - there is no such thing as a 'right religion'. To say so implies there is a 'wrong' religion. With so many religions in the world what are the odds you were born into the 'right' one? What constitutes a 'right' religion? Did God himself come down and announce on TV 'Hey everyone, the Purple Striped Lamb of God followers in northern New Zealand got it right. The rest of you all should have known better and are going to hell'.

The world will be a lot better place to live when everyone realizes that there is no such thing as 'my god' and 'your god'. Everyone is really talking about the exact same thing, with the interpretations diverging because people push what they want to believe into the religion.

Want to kill someone? There's a bible or koran verse to justify that. Be vegetarian? Yup. Eat animals? Yup. Hate gays? Yup. Love everyone? Yup. Beat your children? Yup.

If people stop reading what they want to in the message and actually LISTEN to the message, we'd all just get along.

Comment: Re:No story here (Score 1) 1324

by pnewhook (#30959360) Attached to: US Grants Home Schooling German Family Political Asylum

A fetus, which is biologically a distinct and unique human life.

It's only a fetus after 10 weeks. Before that it is an embryo.

I call it what people have called it for millennia: a child in the womb.

Actually it probably wasn't mentioned much. And in the first trimester the woman probably never realized she was pregnant. Before the 1500s, how life develops in the womb wasn't much understood at all.

Comment: Re:Nice straw man (Score 1) 246

by dbIII (#30958468) Attached to: Freeciv As Benchmark of HTML5 Canvas Javascript Performance

I seriously doubt that any developer is writing a new application that requires IE6.

It was released last month (still called the 2010 version) and our accounts staff are using it.
The crap MSDOS shareware mentality still pervades the MS application developer community. You'll find a lot of big haystacks full of "strawmen" if you look around. It is a real problem not just one I've made up.

Comment: Re:Beware of the spin. (Score 1) 450

by norminator (#30951278) Attached to: Reported Obama Plan Would Privatize Manned Launches
I agree with the guy saying it's nor malice, but I don't think it's exactly ignorance either. I think it's saying what needs to be said to win, the same as any other candidate for public office does.

And I still stand by my vote for Obama, even though I recognize that many things that were promised aren't happening (some of them haven't happened yet, but may still), and that some of his goals don't line up with what I believe is right. I stand by it because I believe that McCain would have been no better, and in fact somewhat worse. His stumbling over dealing with economic issues (before and after the meltdown), his commitment to the bailout, and his selection of Sarah Palin as running mate (who is a serious amplification of all the worst qualities of Obama, but with different political ideals, e.g., worshipped by her following but has very little experience) showed me that although Obama was very much not ideal, McCain was very much worse.

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