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Comment: Re:What is the point? (Score 4, Insightful) 233

The violation of privacy requires some reasonable counterbalancing objective. Inspecting physical goods has the reasonable objective of preventing smuggling. And it's reasonable that if you have something you really want to keep private (say you're a transvestite and don't want to come out), you'll leave the embarrassing material at home.

A phone or other electronic device, on the other hand, can contain all manner of private information. It's a much deeper invasion of privacy than just searching somebody's luggage. Deleting all that information just to be able to travel would constitute a considerable burden for most people.

The counterbalancing objective (I guess preventing the smuggling of child porn or something like that?) is much weaker. There are so many other ways of smuggling data that these inspections aren't likely to lead to any positive results.

So you have a much greater invasion of privacy vs. and a much weaker reasonable objective for needing to perform the search. I don't think the crown will win this, or at least I hope they won't.

Comment: Re:Really? Come on now, you should know better. (Score 1) 331

by drinkypoo (#49188287) Attached to: Would You Need a License To Drive a Self-Driving Car?

What I wanted to show by bringing up this example is that in current airplane design, there are circumstances in which automation is known to fail (in this case, unreliable/defective sensors). In these circumstances, the systems are designed to give control back to the pilot. The rationale for this is quite clear.

Yes, like I said, it's to make the passengers feel good. Because as we have seen, the pilots depend on the same sensors that the autopilot does. Airliners aren't fighters, you don't fly by the seat of your pants. By the time your inner-ear-gyro tells you that there's a problem, you're already screwed. Which was precisely what happened.

How in the shit are pitot tubes still icing anyway? Why is heating the tube not a thing which works? Heating elements are not new technology. We should really be able to manage this by now.

Comment: Re:I have said it before (Score 1) 322

by drinkypoo (#49188227) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles

you mean the basic engineering error where the project manager wouldn't sign off due to the mistake made in concrete formulation so he was fired and a more lenient approver installed in his place?

How about the basic engineering error of siting a reactor somewhere even ancient Japanese could have told you was a mistake? How about the basic engineering error of not protecting your on-site backup power, which is mandatory for maintenance? How about the basic engineering error of storing spent fuel rods on top of reactors? All of those are more significant than the formulation of the concrete.

Comment: Smaller reactors are better. (Score 4, Interesting) 322

by Futurepower(R) (#49188201) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles
I looked at all the comments. There don't seem to be any that mention the underlying issue. Areva makes HUGE reactors. Management of large constructions causes expensive problems. Dealing with a disaster in a huge reactor is also far more difficult.

Quote: "Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production, and reduced siting costs. Most are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction."

The Areva design does not have "passive or inherent safety".

Comment: Re:I developed this crap when I hit 35 (Score 1) 48

by drinkypoo (#49188195) Attached to: Ubisoft Has New Video Game Designed To Treat Lazy Eye

My right eye does that when I'm tired, but my eyelid is actually notably different on that side, I've too much of it. My father had both of his eyelids trimmed back by the VA to try to treat his headaches, apparently only one side of my head has this congenital defect. Probably have it trimmed up next time I go out of the country.

Comment: Re:Define 'desktop' ... (Score 1) 400

XP was supported for a very very long time.

Microsoft is not about to make that same mistake again.

MY PC is built from sabertooth Asus series with solid caps, capicators, vrm, etc. Same with gtx 770 video card. It will last 10 years :-)

Irrelevant. We're talking about the software. My motherboard also has solid caps. Whoop de doo.

Sure Intel will try to sabatoge atom with no SOC drivers so they can cut back on support costs and keep prices low

You mean like AMD did with the Mobile Athlon 64, and R690M chipset? It's disingenuous to call out Intel here.

Many of us will stick with 7 even more so than with XP during the last time.

No you won't, because Microsoft won't keep supporting it into eternity. They had to do that because they wrote long contracts. They won't have done that with Windows 7. XP was a stone around their necks.

+ - Ask Slashdot: Why there is not a campaign against "Cloud Exclusive Hardware" ?

Submitted by martiniturbide
martiniturbide (1203660) writes "Today we can see a lot of hardware that is being sold that only works only against a cloud. There are many examples, like the Belkin NetCam HD+ (wifi webcam) that only works if you run it against their service (by seedonk) and if you don’t want to use their cloud, this hardware is useless. This is happening with a lot of new hardware and it does mean that you get the device cheap for being locked to their cloud, you are paying full price for this devices. On the internet there are just little groups trying to hack some of this hardware, but the consumer does not seems to care that if the manufacturer discontinue the service the hardware will be useless. Why there are no complains against this kind of hardware on the internet? Is it useless to fight “cloud exclusive hardware”? Should we care about it? Or we are so used to disposable hardware that we don’t care anymore?"

+ - Firefox 37 to check security certificates via blocklist->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The next version of Firefox will roll out [https://blog.mozilla.org/security/2015/03/03/revoking-intermediate-certificates-introducing-onecrl/] a ‘pushed’ blocklist of revoked intermediate security certificates, in an effort to avoid using 'live' Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) checks. The 'OneCRL' feature is similar to Google Chrome's CRLSet [https://dev.chromium.org/Home/chromium-security/crlsets], but like that older offering, is limited to intermediate certificates, due to size restrictions in the browser. OneCRL will permit non-live verification on EV certificates, trading off currency for speed. Chrome pushes its trawled list of CA revocations every few hours, and Firefox seems set to follow that method and frequency. Both Firefox and Chrome developers admit that OCSP stapling would be the better solution, but it is currently only supported in 9% of TLS certificates."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Large Gen III+ reactors require special equipment. (Score 1) 322

by Futurepower(R) (#49187083) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles
Also, Areva's reactors are so extremely large that special equipment is needed to make them. See this PDF file: How to Make Nuclear Cheap - The Breakthrough Institute. Quote: "Very large Gen III+ reactors have experienced construction delays and cost overruns."

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