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Comment: Re:Fission = bad, but not super-bad (Score 2) 218

by Sethra (#48171537) Attached to: Fusion and Fission/LFTR: Let's Do Both, Smartly

This is actually the point of LFTR. They operate at low pressure and are inherently unable to "meltdown". It's a design that has lots of promise if not for the fact that we no longer really need it.

We have 6 fission reactors under construction or licensed to begin construction. These are proven reactors designs and there is no shortage of fuel for them to burn. Thorium is more plentiful, but at present consumption levels we already have a worldwide supply of uranium to last another 230 years.

So who is going to invest in a new fission technology at this late stage? Sure, it's cleaner and safer, but it's not economically viable to develop it anymore.

Comment: It appears No-IP.com WAS warned and did nothing (Score 1) 4

by Sethra (#47357823) Attached to: Microsoft takes down No-IP.com domains

If you read the full complaint, there's an entire section (paragraphs 32-36) headlined Defendant Vitalwerks Is on Notice of the Dynamic DNS Abuse and Has Failed to Take Corrective Action wherein Microsoft acknowledges that No-IP does have an anti-abuse policy, but that they're not responsive and that they failed to follow the recommendations that Microsoft and Cisco had put forth earlier in the year. This would seem to contradict No-IP's claim that this was entirely out of the blue.

Comment: He was showing too many warning signs (Score 2) 1233

by Sethra (#44657023) Attached to: Don't Fly During Ramadan

Here is a guy who declined the scan and then tested positive for explosives during the routine pat down.
He has no identification showing a fixed residence.
He has no identification showing his work place.
He can't provide a phone number they can call to verify his work.
The two people he says he's meeting can't be reached by phone either.

These are all legitimate red flags for security to follow up on.

I don't see what the problem is here. This is actually the TSA doing what they should be doing.

The Military

United States Begins Flying Stealth Bombers Over South Korea 567

Posted by samzenpus
from the nice-day-for-a-flight dept.
skade88 writes "The New York Times is reporting that the United States has started flying B-2 stealth bomber runs over South Korea as a show of force to North Korea. The bombers flew 6,500 miles to bomb a South Korean island with mock explosives. Earlier this month the U.S. Military ran mock B-52 bombing runs over the same South Korean island. The U.S. military says it shows that it can execute precision bombing runs at will with little notice needed. The U.S. also reaffirmed their commitment to protecting its allies in the region. The North Koreans have been making threats to turn South Korea into a sea of fire. North Korea has also made threats claiming they will nuke the United States' mainland."

Comment: When our own blood becomes restricted product (Score 2) 173

by Sethra (#36932206) Attached to: Ruling Upholds Gene Patent In Cancer Test

I can see a time when a disease is cured thru gene therapy at which time our own ability to donate blood is banned in the same way Monsanto bans the distribution of their genetically modified crops.

I can no longer sit back and allow Corporate infiltration, Corporate indoctrination, Corporate subversion and the international Corporate conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids.

Comment: Fear Mongering for Sales? (Score 5, Interesting) 216

by Sethra (#27792855) Attached to: Flu Models Predict Pandemic, But Flu Chips Ready
If you trace back to the original EETimes article (http://www.eetimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=217201126) you'll see this in the opening paragraph:

Swine flu may have been caught early enough to prevent a serious U.S. epidemic, according to computer models developed by Virginia Tech's Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory (NDSSL).

So why is this Slashdot story claiming:

"Supercomputer software models predict that swine flu will likely go pandemic sometime next week"

So is the author just panicking unnecessarily or is this another case of using fear tactics to push an agenda, in this case boosting sales of a flu detection chip?

"Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward" -- William E. Davidsen

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