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Comment: For what it's worth (Score 2, Insightful) 791

by Serious Simon (#31313992) Attached to: Killer Apartment Vs. Persistent Microwave Exposure?
In 2004 the Dutch laboratory TNO investigated the influence of UMTS and GSM radiation on two groups of people, one with health complaints they ascribed to GSM base stations and one without. The tests were double blind. For both groups a small, but statistically significant relationship was found between exposure to "UMTS-like" radiation and the sense of wellbeing reported by the subjects. This result was a disappointment to the Dutch government, that had commissioned this investigation. They had subsequent research done by a Swiss institution which did not confirm the findings. Anayway, the city of Hoofddorp, where I live, forbids the placement of cellular base station antennas on top of residential buildings. I support this policy; better safe than sorry.
Cellphones

+ - Talk is cheap, but not everywhere

Submitted by G3ckoG33k
G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden have the lowest prices for mobile phone calls according to a study by OECD. The highest were found in Canada, Spain and the United States. Could that be the reason why Linus Torvalds once uttered "Talk is cheap, show me the code"? Hardly, but the difference between the cheapest and the most expensive is a staggering 500%!"
Education

+ - Results of Textbook Initiative Announced->

Submitted by
bcrowell
bcrowell writes "The results of California Governor Schwarzenegger's Free Digital Textbook Initiative were announced today at a symposium near Los Angeles. Sixteen free high school math and science textbooks were evaluated based on state standards. Almost all the books were Creative Commons-licensed works produced by individuals and nonprofits, with the exception of a consumable biology workbook from Pearson. Participants diverged wildly on open-source versus free-as-in-beer, DRM versus open formats, whether books ought to be fluid or guaranteed not to change for a set period, and on top-down versus bottom-up approaches. Computer manufacturers and traditional publishers were there in force to explain why they should get a bigger share of the shrinking California education budget."
Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - Man jailed after using LimeWire for ID theft->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "A Seattle man has been sentenced to more than three years in prison for using the Limewire file-sharing service to lift personal information from computers across the U.S. The man, Frederick Wood, typed words like "tax return" and "account" into the Limewire search box. That allowed him to find and access computers on the Limewire network with shared folders that contained tax returns and bank account information."
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Comment: Re:So we still have... (Score 3, Funny) 756

by Serious Simon (#29021111) Attached to: Earth's Period of Habitability Is Nearly Over

I'm sure we'll develop something that can shift us around the universe - even if it's just building a generation-ship, but will it be big enough to take *everyone*?

Then it should be a lot bigger than the previous one.

According to ancient sources, it only had space for one family and one pair of each animal species (or seven pairs for clean beasts and fowl)

See Genesis 7...

Privacy

+ - Undercover cameras catch PC repair scams->

Submitted by
Barence
Barence writes "With help from readers of PC Pro, Sky News in the UK launched an undercover investigation into rogue PC repair shops. As a result, Sky's cameras caught technicians scouring through private photos, stealing passwords and over-charging for basic repairs. It was a simple enough job: "To create the fault, we simply loosened one of the memory chips so Windows wouldn't load. To get things working again, one needs only push the chip back into the slot and reboot the machine. Any half-way competent engineers should fix it in minutes." But these technicians had other ideas, stealing photos and documents, as well as login details for email and bank accounts. The eye-opening story is currently running on UK TV, and this PC Pro article has the full report."
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Microsoft

+ - Microsoft backs down over IE8 default setting->

Submitted by
Barence
Barence writes "Internet Explorer 8 will no longer replace the default browser when a user selects the "Use express settings" option during installation. Back in May, Mozilla and Opera accused Microsoft of force-feeding users Internet Explorer 8 through the Automatic Updates process. The object of their ire was the "Use express settings" option which automatically sets Internet Explorer 8 as the default browser. The option was already ticked when Automatic Updates offered users the choice to upgrade their browser. "We heard a lot of feedback from a lot of different people and groups and decided to make the user choice of the default browser even more explicit," notes Microsoft in a blog post."
Link to Original Source
Space

+ - Man on the Moon: Technology then and now->

Submitted by
nk497
nk497 writes "As we mark the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, it's hard to believe how primitive the computing tech that sent Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong into space really was. Pat Norris, who led the team that designed the navigation systems that controlled the orbit of the lunar module on Apollo 11, said: "The computer on the [moon] lander was 64Kb — it's hard to imagine anything so small nowadays when your digital camera has a gigabyte and your mobile phone probably has the same."
But it's not just old space missions that have such low-tech computing power. The ISS computers are powered mainly by Intel 386 processors, according to astronaut Gregory Chamitoff. This is for a good reason — space tech needs to be tried and tested, not cutting edge, so there's no question it will work out in space."

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