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Comment: How to write an article for Reason. (Score 4, Interesting) 489

by Seor Jojoba (#49441295) Attached to: Reason: How To Break the Internet (in a Bad Way)

1. Pick a problem, any problem.
2. Claim it can be solved with laissez faire capitalism and will be worsened with any form of government intervention.
3. Ignore any evidence to the contrary.

In this article, the author acts as though the threat of data discrimination from cable and phone companies is fantastical speculation. But it's already happened, and so many times. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D... In most markets, people only have one or two choices for a broadband connection, so they can't vote with their dollars effectively to resolve the problem. Much as I enjoy the elegance of free market principles, the Invisible Hand is not gonna fix this one.

Comment: Sounds good to me. (Score 4, Insightful) 892

It means that in order for Reddit to be competitive in hiring, they will need to make a first offer (the fixed salary+benefits) that is at or above the market average. As a jobseeker, I can just look at what they have to offer and take it or leave it. No haggling. No drama. That sounds good to me! I'm decent at negotiating, but I don't enjoy it.

For jobs where negotiating skill is NOT part of the job, the negotiation ban should make hiring decisions better correlate with merit. And generally, I want to be surrounded with people hired for relevant merits, and not just good self-promoters.

Comment: Confused about your goals. (Score 1) 60

by Seor Jojoba (#49405627) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Options Beyond YouTube For An Indie Web Show?
You say you are not looking to collect money at any point in distribution. So what do you want? Maybe you want a lot of people to see the show. In that case, Youtube already serves you well for distribution, and you could just focus on advertising/promotion. Or maybe you want clout. Or having colleagues and connections. Or something else?

Comment: Whales = stolen cards? (Score 1) 144

by Seor Jojoba (#46371309) Attached to: Study: Half of In-App Purchases Come From Only 0.15% of Players
Here's a conspiracy theory for you: what if all the big spenders are just people buying stuff with stolen cards? Spending $10,000/month makes a lot more sense when it isn't your money. Plus, online purchases don't have the risks. So it seems like a logical place for stolen cards to be used.

+ - FCC makes second response to Net Neutrality petition.

Submitted by Seor Jojoba
Seor Jojoba writes: The White House provided an initial response to the public petition to restore net neutrality by classifying Internet Providers as "Common Carriers". For myself, it seemed a vague set of assurances with little concrete information. Now, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has released an updated response with more details of what the FCC plans to do.

Comment: Just sent twenty bucks. (Score 2) 240

by Seor Jojoba (#45148013) Attached to: Square Debuts New Email Payment System
It works. You have to give them credit - the process is extremely simple. I could see it taking off. From a security perspective, it's not great. But it's also not as bad as some people here are making out. You don't send any information over email other than the email addresses of the sender and receiver, and sender's intent to send $x to seller. Phishers are likely to pattern "you've got money" emails off of these Square emails to people. But these are just another variation on "give me info/money, so I can send you money" scams. Same common sense defenses apply--If you aren't expecting money from somebody, don't give out personal info. And then there are more sophisticated man-in-the-middle attacks combined with spoofing the "you've got money" email or replacing content in it. Those are the ones I'd worry about, but they are also much harder to set up. When you go to your online banking website, do you worry about someone spoofing the whole site (or at least the login) and making the DNS point towards the spoofed site? I do, but not enough to stop using it.

Comment: It's cool! (Score 1) 149

by Seor Jojoba (#42654763) Attached to: JavaScript Comes To Minecraft

So many times some kid has come up to me and said they wanted to learn to make video games. The trouble is that there's this giant gulf between the multimillion dollar games they play, and what they can actually do with newbie knowledge. When I was a teenager, (80's) I could see a game I loved like say... Ultima or Zork... and understand the steps leading up to me making that game. A little harder to find that maker's connection with Halo, Bioshock, Borderlands, etc. So maybe Minecraft can be a good bridge between the effort of programming and the rewards that are possible. A kid or some coming-up coder might get their feet wet writing some scripting for a game they love. So I'm all for it. Sounds great.

Comment: Indiatimes.com didn't credit AP/Maria Sudekum. (Score 5, Informative) 123

by Seor Jojoba (#42580017) Attached to: Google Fiber Draws Startups To Kansas City

This is actually an Associated Press article by Maria Sudekum. See this link. Indiatimes.com didn't give credit to Maria or AP, which may mean they just snatched and reposted the content. I like to see the original author credited and let her reputation be affected (good or bad) by the quality of her work.

Comment: Sounds like a good homeless setup. (Score 1) 146

by Seor Jojoba (#42015447) Attached to: German Police Stop Man With Mobile Office In Car
I don't know the guy's deal, but I wouldn't be surprised if he lived in that car. Hmm. Sometimes, it doesn't sound like a horrible idea to save up six grand and live in my car for a year. I'd have all the time I wanted to work on my own projects instead of working a 60-hour IT job.

Comment: Vehicle data already being sent. (Score 1) 327

by Seor Jojoba (#41230955) Attached to: Networked Cars: Good For Safety, Bad For Privacy

I work on in-vehicle systems and the servers that talk to them. There are plenty of existing, deployed services that combine external information with the location of your vehicle (e.g. concierge, route planning with points of interest, vehicle locator, charge station finder for EVs, geo-fencing, insurance scoring, and many more). For all of these, your location data must be sent to a server. And any in-vehicle system that provides at least some services that need vehicle location, will make a habit of sending the vehicle location along whether the owner is using those services or not, provided some kind of account activation has occured. Generally, the automotive manufacturers consider vehicle location data great for providing attractive services to their customers.

I've noticed restraint from auto OEMs on taking the data and using it for things other than the services offered to the users. And unlike webbish companies like Facebook, Google, or Twitter, the auto OEMs are focused on selling vehicles, not data. But that can all change if you fall asleep.

The networked collision detection stuff is interesting, but doesn't change the nature of the problem. The data is already being collected for boring old services from three years back.

I'd rather just believe that it's done by little elves running around.

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