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Submission + - Megaupload Trial May Never Happen, Judge Says

Turbine2k5 writes: A US judge has put a bomb under the Megaupload case by informing the FBI that a trial in the United States may never happen. The cyberlocker was never formally served with the appropriate paperwork by the US authorities, as it is impossible to serve a foreign company with criminal charges.
Open Source

Submission + - Scientists Can Recreate Brain 'Flow' State in Lab; You too, soon ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: A small software startup called “GoFlow”, a company that is making a DIY opensource kit for tDCS. tDCS, in case you are wondering, stands for “transcranial Direct Current Stimulation".
Tennis players report it, expert video game players know it well. It is a state in which you are utterly focused on the task, one in which you learn faster and perform better. All with the flip of a switch.

GoFlow is attempting to build a $99.00 device that can be comfortably worn while doing whatever it is you do...


Submission + - Boeing prepares an ultra-secure smartphone (

An anonymous reader writes: "Earlier this week, it was revealed that aerospace firm Boeing was working on a high security mobile device for the various intelligence departments. This device will most likely be released later this year, and at a lower price point than other mobile phones targeted at the same communities. Typically, phones in this range cost about $15,000-$20,000 per phone, and use custom hardware and software to get the job done. This phone will most likely use Android as its main operating system of choice, which lowers the cost per phone, since Boeing's developers don't have to write their own operating system from scratch."

Submission + - A Crab-Based Computer (

mikejuk writes: No this is not a joke.
You can build a computer out of all sorts of things — mechanical components, vacuum tubes, transistors, fluids and ... crabs. Researchers have discovered that soldier crabs have behaviors suitable for implementing simple logic and hence — with enough crabs — you can achieve a complete computer.
The Soldier crab Mictyris guinotae has a swarming behavior that is just right for simple logic gates. When two crab swarms collide they fuse to make a single swarm — and this is enough to build an OR gate.
It seems you can build a computer out of almost anything.

Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - Shadowrun Returns (

Securityemo writes: Jordan Weisman, creator of the "Shadowrun" line of pen-and-paper role-playing games has apparently initiated a kickstarter project together with many long-standing Shadowrun authors and artists, aiming to create a 2D turn-based single-player game with a deep storyline and character developement. Will this game finally be the one that does full justice to the PnP version, making up for the mediocre 2007 first-person-shooter interpretation?

Submission + - US physicists fight to save neutrino experiment (

ananyo writes: The future of a pioneering project to study the lightest matter particles known was thrown into jeopardy last week (, when officials at the US Department of Energy (DOE) announced that they were reluctant to fund the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment ( in its current form. The experiment's leaders will meet this week at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, to discuss ways to allay the agency's concerns.
The LBNE would use more than 30,000 tonnes of liquid argon housed 1,480 metres underground in the Homestake Mine near Lead, South Dakota, to detect a beam of neutrinos or antineutrinos sent from Fermilab, 1,300 kilometres away. The experiment would measure the rates at which neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate between their three different types, or flavours, and so test a hypothesized asymmetry between matter and antimatter ( Detecting asymmetry could explain why there is so much more matter than antimatter in our Universe.
At a cost of between US$1.2 billion and $1.5 billion, the LBNE was expected to come online in 2022–24, and to have a construction budget peaking at roughly $200 million per year. But that is now considered too great a slice of the DOE’s annual high-energy physics budget, which was cut by $6 million to $757 million in US President Barack Obama’s 2013 budget request (


Submission + - Want to go to jail over a Facebook posting? Move to the UK then. (

plasm4 writes: 21 year old Liam Stacey has been charged with inciting racial hatred after making comments on twitter about football player Fabrice Muamba who collapsed on the pitch during a game. He will be sentenced Monday and potentially faces a year in prison.

Last week another young man was charged with a racially aggravated public order offence after emotionally commenting on Facebook about 6 British soldiers who died in Afghanistan. The comments suggested that we should also mourn the thousands dying in Afghanistan, and suggested that the soldiers would burn in hell. It's also interesting that most of the websites I've read haven't actually published the comments which don't seem racist at all. The Guardian has a screenshot of his Facebook page.

These aren't the first cases of people arrested over Facebook and Twitter postings. Where do you think the current trends will lead to? If today you can be arrested for trolling in Britain, and given the total lack of public concern over it, what do you think the situation will be like in ten years?

Submission + - Throw Them All Out! A Campaign to Oust Incumbent Congress Critters (

An anonymous reader writes: This is a campaign to get people to focus not on party affiliation but on incumbency for the 2012 election. Both political parties are bent on big government fascism and conspire to take away the freedoms of the American people. We go through a revolving door of focusing on retaking Congress from one corrupt party to the next, meanwhile even in 2010 87% of incumbents got re-elected. By focusing on getting rid of the 96% of incumbents who vote for treasonous legislation like the NDAA, Patriot Act, and unnecessary wars, we can finally get real change in Congress.

Submission + - Woman helped sell fake chips to US military (

alphadogg writes: A Florida woman has pleaded guilty to charges that she helped her employer sell counterfeit computer chips for use by the U.S. military

Stephanie McCloskey, 38, was an administrator at VisionTech Components, a Clearwater, Fla., company that sold military-grade integrated circuits designed to handle extreme temperatures and the shocks and bumps of battlefield use. McCloskey has pleaded guilty to a single conspiracy charge. She faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Prosecutors say that VisionTech did more than $15.8 million in business over a three-year period, doctoring and then selling counterfeit integrated circuits imported from Hong Kong and China.

Company employees would scuff up labels to make it impossible to tell if the devices in the box matched the code on the labels and use "large erasers" to polish up the integrated circuits when they arrived in shoddy condition, McCloskey admitted in a Statement of Offense declaration she signed last week in connection with her guilty plea.


Submission + - 'David and Goliath' Black Hole Clashes Analyzed (

astroengine writes: "What happens when a small black hole takes on a big black hole? It doesn't end well for the small black hole. This may sound like a simple outcome to a black hole merger, but the mathematics used to simulate the collision of two black holes of equal mass can occupy supercomputers for months. So far, it hasn't been possible to simulate the merger of mismatched black hole masses. But now, scientists from the Rochester Institute of Technology's (RIT) Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation have successfully simulated the merger of black holes of unequal masses to see what kinds of gravitational wave signatures they generate. (All it took was 3 months of computations by 70,000 processors.)"

Submission + - The real story behind Hecker’s North Korean (

Martin Hellman writes: Former Los Alamos Director Siegfried Hecker recently returned from his seventh trip in as many years to North Korea. The purpose of his visits has been to assess that nation’s nuclear program and to seek ways to defuse the nuclear threat on the Korean peninsula. It is unfortunate that the extensive press coverage of his trip has focused on the parts that feed American fears. This is dangerous because, in a guest lecture to my seminar last February, Prof. Hecker suggested a program to improve American national security with respect to North Korea, but noted that it was impossible to implement because of domestic political considerations. Media coverage that reinforces American fears and myths therefore harms our national security. When I emailed Prof. Hecker about some inaccurate reporting on his most recent trip, he told me to "check the CISAC website for the real story." My current blog post summarizes that “real story” and its implications for national security.

Submission + - China Penetrated NSA's Classified Operating System 2

Pickens writes: "Seymour M. Hersh writes in the New Yorker that after an American EP-3E Aries II reconnaissance plane on an eavesdropping mission collided with a Chinese interceptor jet over the South China Sea in 2001 and landed at a Chinese F-8 fighter base on Hainan Island, the 24 member crew were unable to completely disable the plane’s equipment and software. The result? The Chinese kept the plane for three months and eventually reverse-engineered the plane’s NSA.-supplied operating system, estimated at between thirty and fifty million lines of computer code, giving China a road map for decrypting the Navy’s classified intelligence and operational data. “If the operating system was controlling what you’d expect on an intelligence aircraft, it would have a bunch of drivers to capture radar and telemetry,” says Whitfield Diffie, a pioneer in the field of encryption. “The plane was configured for what it wants to snoop, and the Chinese would want to know what we wanted to know about them—what we could intercept and they could not.” Despite initial skepticism, over the next few years the US intelligence community began to “read the tells” that China had gotten access to sensitive traffic and in early 2009, Admiral Timothy J. Keating, then the head of the Pacific Command, brought the issue to the new Obama Administration. "If China had reverse-engineered the EP-3E’s operating system, all such systems in the Navy would have to be replaced, at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars," writes Hersch. "After much discussion, several current and former officials said, this was done" prompting some black humor from US naval officers. “This is one hell of a way to go about getting a new operating system.”""

Submission + - Brain Responds More to Close Friends

An anonymous reader writes: People's brains are more responsive to friends than to strangers, even if the stranger has more in common, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers examined a brain region known to be involved in processing social information, and the results suggest that social alliances outweigh shared interests. In a study led by graduate student Fenna Krienen and senior author Randy Buckner, PhD, of Harvard University, researchers investigated how the medial prefrontal cortex and associated brain regions signal someone's value in a social situation. Previous work has shown that perceptions of others' beliefs guide social interactions. Krienen and her colleagues wondered whether these brain regions respond more to those we know, or to those with whom we share similar interests.

Submission + - Maryland Attorney General Upholds Right to Video (

tombeard writes: Making a recording of a police traffic stop is not a crime in the opinion of Maryland's attorney general. In a ruling issued last month from the state's top law enforcement office, Chief Counsel Robert N. McDonald found the legal grounds weak for felony wiretapping charges of the type brought against a motorcyclist who posted a video of himself being arrested on YouTube. Maryland State Police had taken advantage of ambiguity in the law to prosecute Anthony Graber, 25 for the April 13 recording.

Submission + - 8X Spike in Asterisk Login Attempts in August 2

tinkerghost writes: Sometime this weekend, my Asterisk/mail server hit the disk limit on the /var directory. Why you ask? Because it turns out my Asterisk server has been logging about 4Gig worth of login attempts per week since late July. I had logrotate set to cycle the file out weekly and keep 4 weeks of logs. Since the log has been steady at about 500Mb/week for the last 2 years this has worked fine. Unfortunately, this new rush overwhelmed my disk space and locked out new voicemail & email messages. I've already re-configured logrotate to rotate on file size, but I'm wondering if any other SIP server users have been seeing a huge spike in their scripted login attempts.

"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. -- Alfred North Whitehead