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Comment Re:two points (Score 1) 417 417

Thanks for the clarification. your phrasing was ambiguous and your conclusions inaccurate, nonetheless, or misleading at best. It is not entirely your fault - the premise of the original post was also completely off the mark. Namespace controls on CA signing *should* be the topic under discussion. There are perfectly legitimate reasons for root and intermediate CA public key distribution; in fact, that's the way that PKI works. The private key is of course held by the CA and protecting it is essential. If you are looking for a point of agreement, there it is. To the degree that multiple sources of root CAs are required for PKI to work in practice, there is obviously an increased risk if more root CAs are employed, but applying the reductio ad adsurbum rule to this argument would imply that the optimum number of root CAs is zero (or one, which has its own risk considerations). In general, the original poster is wrong to imply that distribution of a root CA (and any needed intermediate CA) public certificates is in any way indicative of evil intent, or that it necessarily allows MITM or other hacks to be applied. I do agree that browsers could and should be written to warn of the presence of such roots of trust if they come without appropriate namespace limitations. The whole argument presented here is fairly absurd and juvenile, but like all points of rancor on the internet, there is some small set of issues at its core that have always been clear and could usefully be brought out in further discussion.

Comment Please post practical information (Score 2) 734 734

Thinking seriously about adding a solar panel + inverter + storage option for electric car charging and air conditioning, my biggest electricity usage needs. Each of these could be interrupted briefly for switchover to power company feeds without degradation in service, unlike using the solar electricity for normal household power. Since we live in an area that has abundant sunshine and high electric costs, this would seem to me to be the low-hanging fruit for solar electricity and would avoid policy and contract issues with our local power provider. So how about a few practical posts from people who have information to share, and less hyperventilating about politics and policy?

Comment More hits than misses (Score 1) 385 385

Considering the trends when he was writing, and which of these were easy projections compared to tough predictions, I'd say the Good Doctor got much more right than wrong in this article. You were expecting may be 100% You've been reading too much Buzzfeed...

Comment First year of WhatsApp free; then what? (Score 1) 457 457

Has no one noticed in this thread that the revenue model of WhatsApp is to charge after the first year of use? It's not surprising that it would be popular while it is free, especially with no advertising. How many of these young users will start to pay after the first year of use?

Comment Would definitely be dead without my helmet (Score 1) 1651 1651

I'd be dead without mine. Picture this: me moving about 30 miles per hour down a long straight hill in the Bay area, pedaling hard, and misjudging the light I see changing on the side street, I plow my bike full-on into the side of a car turning right in front of me. The 100+ feet of skid marks I left on the asphalt before correctly determining that I would not be able to stop were not enough to avoid the collision. About 30 feet before my bike slammed into the side of the vehicle, I stood up on the left side pedal, timed my departure, and pushed off, jumping from it in time to fly through the air just behind the car as my bike proceeded ahead. It was a cool day, and I had a jacket on. I sailed upside down, face up past the car and landed on my back and head, sliding along the ground on my jacket and helmet for a good 20 or 30 feet farther down the slope. I remember coming to rest and laying there for a while, then getting up to check the car and the accident site. I was fine, though a little shaken up. Traffic had stopped in each direction and people were swarming around the car. The driver got out, completely white. I looked at the dent and my bike, crumpled and considerably shorter than it had ever been from one end to the other. People said they had seen sparks when the collision happened. I told the driver, looking at the dent, "I'm sorry about your car." He said in a high voice, "Never mind about the car! Are you all right?" I said I was fine. I felt pretty wobbly, though, and someone took me the rest of the way home. Later, I took the bike into our local shop, which was a good one. The guy behind the counter turned around from the bike he was working on, and when he saw what I had carried in, he put down the wrench, came around the counter, put his hand on my shoulder and said firmly but gently, "My friend, that bike is history." I would be dead without my helmet. Bikes are not just for tooling around parks slowly, looking at the scenery. And even when you think they are, or just vehicles for ambling gently from place to place, things can turn ugly in an unexpected way very, very fast. *Wear your helmet.*

Comment Would definitely be dead without my helmet. (Score 1) 104 104

I'd be dead without mine. Picture this: me moving about 30 miles per hour down a long straight hill in the Bay area, pedaling hard, and misjudging the light I see changing on the side street, I plow my bike full-on into the side of a car turning right in front of me. The 100+ feet of skid marks I left on the asphalt before correctly determining that I would not be able to stop were not enough to avoid the collision. About 30 feet before my bike slammed into the side of the vehicle, I stood up on the left side pedal, timed my departure, and pushed off, jumping from it in time to fly through the air just behind the car as my bike proceeded ahead. It was a cool day, and I had a jacket on. I sailed upside down, face up past the car and landed on my back and head, sliding along the ground on my jacket and helmet for a good 20 or 30 feet farther down the slope. I remember coming to rest and laying there for a while, then getting up to check the car and the accident site. I was fine, though a little shaken up. Traffic had stopped in each direction and people were swarming around the car. The driver got out, completely white. I looked at the dent and my bike, crumpled and considerably shorter than it had ever been from one end to the other. People said they had seen sparks when the collision happened. I told the driver, looking at the dent, "I'm sorry about your car." He said in a high voice, "Never mind about the car! Are you all right?" I said I was fine. I felt pretty wobbly, though, and someone took me the rest of the way home. Later, I took the bike into our local shop, which was a good one. The guy behind the counter turned around from the bike he was working on, and when he saw what I had carried in, he put down the wrench, came around the counter, put his hand on my shoulder and said firmly but gently, "My friend, that bike is history." I would be dead without my helmet. Bikes are not just for tooling around parks slowly, looking at the scenery. And even when you think they are, or just vehicles for ambling gently from place to place, things can turn ugly in an unexpected way very, very fast. Wear your helmet.

Comment I adblock for performance reasons only (Score 1) 716 716

Apart from the visual clutter that advertising produces, which I find distracting, the cpu load from flash and animated or script-enabled ads is simply not worth the performance impact that it has on my (fairly new, modern) machines. This applies to both laptops, where there is also an impact on battery life, as well as desktops. I don't say this out of speculation; anyone with a small computer with a fan that responds to cpu load can verify it on their own, and I have also measured the effect of turning on various levels of ad-blocking on cpu and disk I/O real-time when making my decisions. Overall, my message to advertisers is: less is more. If you stray too far into technologies that consume resources on the user side of the equation, you will be blocked.
Facebook

Submission + - How to best setup a school internet filter? 2 2

An anonymous reader writes: I was recently volunteered to be the network/computer admin for a small non-profit school. One of the items asked of me had to do with filtering inappropriate content (i.e. stuff you wouldn't want your mother to see). Essentially we want to protect people who aren't able to protect themselves, at least while on campus.

Basic site filtering is fairly easy — setup squid with one of the many filtering engines and click to filter the categories your interested. Additionally, making the computer lab highly visible uses public shame and humiliation to limit additional activity.

The real question — How do you filter Facebook? There is a lot of great content and features on Facebook, and its a great way to stay in contact with friends, but there is also a potentially dark side as well. Along with inappropriate content, there is a tendency to share more information than should be shared, and not everyone follows proper security and privacy guidelines.

Is there a way to setup campus-wide security/privacy policies for Facebook?
Medicine

Submission + - Scientists Explain How the Brain Cleans Itself-> 1 1

An anonymous reader writes: Every organ in the body has to expel waste somehow. Despite the brain's importance in the body, scientists were previously unclear as to how the brain flushed out its toxins, because it did not have a lymphatic system like other organs, which filters out waste. The previous theory stated the cerebrospinal fluid, in which the brain is encased, expelled junk, as waste floated through tissues and made its way onto the surface – but that seemed wildly inconvenient for the amount of waste that the brain must produce. Now, researchers have discovered a second, faster cleaning system on top of the cerebrospinal fluid, and it may shed some light on what happens during disorders that affect the brain.
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