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Submission + - India: 'Massive' uranium find in India (

GillBates0 writes: "BBC reports that India's southern state of Andhra Pradesh may have one of the largest reserves of uranium in the world. India is planning to set up about 30 reactors over as many years and get a quarter of its electricity from nuclear energy by 2050."

Submission + - BiPod Flying Car Makes (Short) Test Flights (

Zothecula writes: The team at Scaled Composites pulled out all the stops to realize the final design of the company's founder and former CTO, Burt Rutan, ahead of his retirement in April earlier this year. In just four months, the Scaled Composites team went from beginning the preliminary design to the first flight of the "BiPod", a hybrid gasoline-electric flying car that grew out of a program to develop a rapid, low-cost electric test bed using as many off-the-shelf components as possible.

Submission + - NH Man Arrested for Videotaping Police.. Again ( 1

OhPlz writes: Back in 2006, a resident of New Hampshire's second largest city was arrested while at the police station attempting to file a complaint against officers. His crime? He had video tape evidence of the officers' wrongdoings. According to the police, that's wiretapping.

After world wide attention, the police dropped the charges. His complaint was found to be valid, but the evidence never saw the light of day.

Well, guess what? Round two. There are differing reports, but again the police arrested Mr. Gannon and again, they seized his video camera. This time it's "falsifying evidence" because he tried to hand off the camera, most likely to protect its contents.

Once again, if the police are free to videotape us, why aren't we free to videotape them? If there's the potential of police wrongdoing, how is it that the law permits the police to seize the evidence?


Submission + - Gov't Funded Electric Car Co. Goes Out of Business (

thecarchik writes: Consider today's collapse of electric car company Green Vehicles an object lesson in why it's a bad idea for cities to invest in the risky business of start-up car companies--perhaps especially start-up electric car companies. Even start up car companies with a viable product have seen their fair share of financial troubles , but Green Vehicles did not even have a product to sell off at a fire sale. The city of Salinas, California learned that lesson today as Green Vehicles shut its doors, costing the city more than $500,000.

Submission + - Japanese Supreme Court Rules TV Forwarding Illegal (

eldavojohn writes: If you use anything like a Slingbox in Japan, you may be dismayed to find out that a Japanese maker of a similar service has been successfully sued by Japan Broadcasting Corp. and five Tokyo-based local TV broadcasting firms under copyright violations for empowering users to do similar things. TV forwarding or place shifting is recording and/or moving your normal TV signal from its intended living room box to your home computer or anywhere on the internet. Turns out that Japan's Supreme Court overruled lower court decisions confirming fears that to even facilitate this functionality is a copyright infringement on the work that is being transferred.

Submission + - New tech creates 3D faces from 2D images (

cylonlover writes: Biometric technology allows for the verification of an individual’s identity via parameters such as their fingerprints, iris, voice, DNA ... or facial features. However, given that most people’s faces have so much in common with one another (two eyes, a nose, etc.), it’s sometimes difficult for biometric systems to tell them apart based on flat two-dimensional images. With that in mind, researchers from Florida Atlantic University (FAU) in Boca Raton have created a computer algorithm that is capable of creating 3D models of faces based on 2D images.

Submission + - Comics Code dead (

tverbeek writes: After more than half a century of stifling the comic book industry, the Comics Code Authority is effectively dead. Created in response to Fredric Wertham's Seduction of the Innocent, one of the early think-of-the-children censorship campaigns, and Congressional hearings, the Code laid out a checklist of requirements and restrictions for comics to be distributed to newsstand vendors, effectively ensuring that in North America, only simplistic stories for children would be told using the medium of sequential art. It gradually lost many of its teeth, and an increasing number of publishers gave up on newsstand distribution and ignored the Code, but at the turn of the century the US's largest comics publishers still participated. Marvel quit it in 2001, in favor of self-applied ratings styled after the MPAA's and ESRB's. Last year Bongo (publishers of the Simpsons comics) quietly dropped out. Now DC and Archie, the last publishers willingly subjecting their books to approval, have announced that they're discontinuing their use of the CCA, with DC following Marvel's example, and Archie (which recently introduced an openly gay supporting character, something flatly forbidden by the original Code) carrying on under their own standards. The Code's cousins: the MPAA and ESRB ratings, the RIAA parental advisory, and the mishmash of warnings on TV shows still live on, but at least North American comics publishers are no longer subject to external censorship.

Submission + - 3-D Stop Action Created with Kinect and Minecraft (

invid writes: Watch out Ray Harryhausen. A programmer has turned the Kinect into a 3-D scanner used to create stop-action movies in the Minecraft. All the source code is available for you do-it-yourselfers who want to place giant statues of yourself or your pets in Minecraft, or any other object you care to have made into block form.

Submission + - Why there is no lossy image format with alpha? ( 8

ciantic writes: Almost every web developer would benefit from image format that has the capabilities of JPEG and Alpha Channel like in PNG. But why there is not any? Google is developing WebP but it seems like it does not include this killer feature, and as it is discussed it gets to stand still when engineer asks something specific. What is the main issue here? Clearly web is missing this kind of format. From my naive stand point of view the alpha channel would be just like RGB channels, with slight exception the extreme values of Alpha should not be compressed. If you need examples why such format is needed, there is not shortage of that in web. Common example for this kind of need is tilted Polaroid picture with transparent background, and gradient fading in photographs.

Submission + - Motorola sticks to guns on locking down Android (

jeffmeden writes: "These aren't the droids you're looking for" proclaims Motorola, maker of the popular Android smartphones such as the Droid 2 and Droid X. At least, not if you have any intention of loading a customized operating system, according to Motorola's own Youtube channel used to show off upcoming products. Motorola:"@tdcrooks if you want to do custom roms, then buy elsewhere, we'll continue with our strategy that is working thanks." The strategy they are referring to is a feature Motorola pioneered called "e-fuse", the ability for the phone's CPU to stop working if it detects unauthorized software running. More information available via a story at Android blog site AndroidCentral

Submission + - Hostile FFMPEG takeover 1

Skinkie writes: Hi everyone

I just wanted to say that iam as surprised as everyone else about what has
happened in the last few hours and that some developers overtaking
official ffmpeg and closing everyone elses write access without any kind of
public discussion is kinda nasty.
Of course its their full right to fork if they see the need for that but thats
not exactly what they did.

And that I and everyone i spoke with dont even know the reason behind this move

Michael GnuPG fingerprint: 9FF2128B147EF6730BADF133611EC787040B0FAB

Submission + - Angry Red Dwarfs May Scorch Alien Life

Hugh Pickens writes: "BBC reports that a study of 210,000 red dwarfs — the most common type of star in our galaxy comprising roughly 75 percent of all the stars in the Milky Way — has found that solar flares are surprisingly frequent unleashing streams of particles that could play havoc with planets' atmospheres — destroying the protective ozone layer, so while the number of exoplanets is rising rapidly, with an implicit hope of finding planets with conditions suitable for life, many questions remain about the very long-term habitability that the Earth has enjoyed. Solar flares unleash bright flashes of light along with streams of charged particles like high-energy protons that can react with atmospheres to destroy ozone, making a planet that had an atmosphere susceptible to strong ultraviolet rays that are known to damage DNA. "Such powerful flares bode ill for any possible biology, life, on any planet that happens to be close to that flaring star," says exoplanet expert Geoff Marcy. "It's extraordinary to think that the most numerous stars, the smallest ones in our galaxy, pose this threat to life.""

Submission + - Don't use iphone below freezing ( 2

TyFoN writes: According to a Norwegian woman, her phone exploded when driving to work. When contacting Apple support, they explained that the phone is only rated for 0C to 35C and since she used it in -12C the warranty was void.
This means that if you live in a country where the temperature potentially drops below 0C (32F), be careful of when you use the phone.
The article is from Aftenposten in Norwegian, a translated version is available through google.

Submission + - WikiLeaks And The Guardian Didn't See Eye To Eye (

OCatenac writes: Vanity Fair has an article describing the uneasy relationship between Julian Assange and the Guardian, the UK newspaper that has been one of the main outlets for Wikileaks secrets.

Among the more interesting and ironic revelations is the fact that Assange threatened to sue the Guardian to keep it from publishing the information supplied to it by Wikileaks because he could not exercise sufficient control over what they published and what they did not.

From the article:
"In Rusbridger’s office, Assange’s position was rife with ironies. An unwavering advocate of full, unfettered disclosure of primary-source material, Assange was now seeking to keep highly sensitive information from reaching a broader audience. He had become the victim of his own methods: someone at WikiLeaks, where there was no shortage of disgruntled volunteers, had leaked the last big segment of the documents, and they ended up at The Guardian in such a way that the paper was released from its previous agreement with Assange—that The Guardian would publish its stories only when Assange gave his permission. Enraged that he had lost control, Assange unleashed his threat, arguing that he owned the information and had a financial interest in how and when it was released."

Perhaps it's too easy an interpretation of his actions but Assange is beginning to sound a bit arrogant; that is, it sounds as if he's fine with releasing documents as long as he's the person controlling the flow of information but when he loses that control he's threatening to use the same sort of legal tactics that we all despise from the IP cartel.


Submission + - Hypersonic Radio Black-Out Problem Solved (

KentuckyFC writes: Russian physicists have come up with a new way to communicate with hypersonic vehicles surrounded by a sheath of plasma. Ordinarily, this plasma absorbs and reflects radio waves at communications frequencies leading to a few tense minutes during the re-entry of manned vehicles such as the shuttle. However, the problem is even more acute for military vehicles such as ballistic missiles and hypersonic planes. Radio black out prevents these vehicles from accessing GPS signals for navigation and does not allow them to be re-targeted or disarmed at the last minute. But a group of Russian physicists say they can get around this problem by turning the entire plasma sheath into a radio antenna. They point out that any incoming signal is both reflected and absorbed by the plasma. The reflected signal is lost but the absorbed energy sets up a resonating electric field at a certain depth within the plasma. In effect, this layer within the plasma acts like a radio antenna, receiving the signal. However, the signal cannot travel further through the plasma to the spacecraft. Their new idea is to zap this layer with radio waves generated from within the spacecraft. These waves will be both absorbed by the plasma and reflected back inside the spacecraft. However, the key point is that the reflected waves ought to be modulated by any changes in the electric field within the plasma. In other words, the reflected waves should carry a kind of imprint of the original external radio signal. That would allow the craft to receive external signals from GPs satellites or ground control. And the same process in reverse allows the spacecraft to broadcast signals too.

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