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Perl

+ - Perl Survey->

Submitted by
thefotios
thefotios writes "The Perl Survey is attempting to take a snapshot of the Perl world as it currently stands. Whether you're a web developer, sysadmin, or using Perl for scientific research or finance or just tracking your DVD collection, we'd love to hear about it.

We're trying to answer questions like:

        * Where do Perl programmers come from?
        * What sort of fields do they work in?
        * What languages — computer and spoken — do Perl programmers use?
        * How many use Perl as their primary language?
        * What proportion of Perl users participate in the Perl community through mailing lists, user groups, and conferences?

It only takes about 5 minutes to complete.

The survey will be open until September 30th, 2007. After that, we'll be
reporting on the results and making the data freely available."

Link to Original Source
Programming

+ - Adding a web interface to a C++ application

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "One thing that is always sort of a pain is setting up a graphical user interface. This is especially true if you are making an embedded application or something that functions more as a system service or daemon. In this case you probably end up creating some simple network protocol which you use to control your application via some other remote piece of software or just telnet if you are feeling especially lazy. Another option is to create a web interface and this article shows via a simple example how you can do that in C++ in just a few lines of code."
Software

+ - Complete Computing System in 20K lines of Code

Submitted by
Ron Teitelbaum
Ron Teitelbaum writes "Viewpoints Research Institute work Steps Toward The Reinvention of Programming — A Compact And Practical Model of Personal Computing As A Self-Exploratorium has been picked up by the National Science Foundation and will be supported with a 5 year grant. Check out Ian Piumarta's, of Viewpoints Research Institute, Stanford University talk"
GNUStep

+ - USD $1000 bounty for porting WebKit to GNUstep

Submitted by
Yen-Ju Chen
Yen-Ju Chen writes "Jesse Ross said:

I would like to start a bounty for the port of WebKit to GNUstep. In order to receive the bounty, the following requirements must be met: — The port should use the latest code (as of 2006.02.28) from the WebKit Subversion repository as located at http://webkit.org/ — All patches must be submitted back to the original codebase. We would like to avoid a fork by getting GNUstep support in WebKit proper. — Along with the port of WebKit itself, the potential bounty recipient must also include a GORM palette for embedding web views in GNUstep applications. Upon completion of the above items and a code review by selected third-party developers, the bounty will be disbursed within 60 days after code delivery. The amount of the bounty is $500 USD — if others would like to offset some of my personal cost, or contribute to the bounty, please contact me and I will coordinate the transactions.
and Peter Cooper followed

It's going to be a non-trivial activity, so I've offered to match his $500. I'm in favour of having some sensible sunset clause on the bounty, but I'll leave that to Jesse to think about.
"
OS X

+ - Best Backup Solution For OS X?

Submitted by SpartanVII
SpartanVII (838669) writes "I purchased a Mac roughly two years ago and have made the switch with a fair amount of ease. However, one thing that has troubled me is how best to backup my important data to an external hard drive. Right now I have rigged up an Automator workflow that runs every night, but I have also seen software options like SuperDuper and Knox. Since the Automator workflow lacks much of the flexibility and features available with these apps, I am ready to try something else. What app have you come across that provides the best backup solution?"
Robotics

+ - Borg Implants A Reality In Our Lifetime?

Submitted by
markmcgimpsey
markmcgimpsey writes "The University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom have developed an electronic switch based on DNA which provides a basic foundation for an interface between a living entity and a computer.

What are the implications?

History has proved with all great discoveries come great benefits and equally great hazards.

Possible benefits include artificial limbs powered by thought, new artificial organs, medical alert systems that may summon medical assistance automatically on detection of a life threatening situation, and automatic drug dispensing. Direct brain links to information sources may also be possible, and here is where the 'Dark Side' of our natures may become our downfall.

Direct access to surveillance systems, monitoring hardware and software, virtual reality porn implants, and an eventual de-humanisation of our race. Our combat soldiers and pilots may become something out of a science fiction movie. The Cyborg may eventually become a reality.

We are already on the dangerous edge of cloning, are we now firmly on the road to Armageddon?

http://biosingularity.wordpress.com/2006/10/26/res earchers-develop-dna-switch-to-interface-living-or ganisms-with-computers/

Article by Mark McGimpsey
www.markmcgimpsey.wordpress.com"
Upgrades

+ - What gets you excited?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "10 Years ago I was excited about three things in the technology world, CD-Writers, Digital Cameras, and Broadband Internet Access (and to a lesser extent, a stable O/S). Now that we've gotten to the point where these things are ubiquitous, there is really nothing I'm looking forward to. Powerful CPUs and large amounts of RAM are cheap, whereas you once needed a $3000 pc to run the latest and greatest programs, now almost anything can be run on a $500 pc. Am I alone in this thinking? Is that anything you're looking forward to these days?"

Entropy requires no maintenance. -- Markoff Chaney

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