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Comment: Re:So, in essence, Uber's app is malware (Score 1) 220

by Runaway1956 (#48476165) Attached to: Uber's Android App Caught Reporting Data Back Without Permission

"It doesn't have any future data."

You hope not, anyway. If they have an accurate image of you, and/or if you tagged any "friends" who supply information about you - you're a little bit fokked. It may not be necessary for you to maintain an account for Facebook to update your status - alive, dead, incarcerated, employed, unemployed, married, on the prowl, whatever.

As for actual future data - seen any good movies lately?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M...

Comment: Re: I bet Infosys and Tata are dancing in the stre (Score 1) 186

$400k - equal to 8 years wages for the average American household. The AVERAGE worker today earns about 20-25k. His/her spouse probably works, and earns about the same. Total income for a working couple, about 50k.

I wish the hell that I were making a paltry 400k, and worrying about sending two offspring to college.

Comment: Re:Disaster preparedness (Score 1) 43

by Runaway1956 (#48301941) Attached to: Japan's Annual Nuclear Drill Highlights Problems

Gotta hand it to you - you've already come up with a better plan than the authorities. And, thank you for making my point. Alternative plans should be plentiful, and a little ad libbing might just save the day.

"Everyone go home, as long as you have a structurally sound home to go to. Everyone else go to the high school. When the seas are calm, we'll all come back and sail off into the sunset." Or, sunrise, as the case may be.

Comment: Re:Disaster preparedness (Score 1) 43

by Runaway1956 (#48301651) Attached to: Japan's Annual Nuclear Drill Highlights Problems

"If nuclear fallout is part of the picture, you may not want people exposed and crossing terrain on their own."

Sounds reasonable. But, since the water is to rough to sail, we're going to leave them there? The persons on scene need to see a map, and they need to determine whether their chances of survival are better if they wait for calm weather, or if they strike out cross country.

You may not want to deal with a nuclear disaster at all, but the reason for the drill is that nuclear disasters do happen.

Comment: Disaster preparedness (Score 1) 43

by Runaway1956 (#48301391) Attached to: Japan's Annual Nuclear Drill Highlights Problems

Disaster preparedness is NOT "a plan". Instead, it is being prepared to act in accordance with Plan A, or Plan B, or Plan C, as appropriate. It is also being prepared to ad lib in case none of the plans prove to be appropriate.

So, the whole operation began with an ASSumption that the roads were impassable? Maybe Plan B or Plan C should have arranged for these people to make their way BY FOOT and ACROSS COUNTRY to some other assembly point?

Hey - those ancient aborigines who settled the Americas came here by foot, right? What has changed? Has the human foot quit working?

Any idiot can make a plan. Even a committee can make a plan. The guy who makes the plan work needs brains on his side.

Comment: Where did the author go to school? (Score 1) 232

"Contrary to what we were sometimes taught in high school physics, the Earth's gravity is not constant."

I began my education in 1961. That's pretty far back, I guess. I learned a little about gravity before I left elementary school. Then, a bit more in junior high school. Junior high didn't teach me that gravity is constant on the earth's surface. I was exposed to the idea that gravity varies from one place to another, and we were taught that our weight might vary by a couple of pounds depending where we stood on the earth. Cool idea, we were moderately impressed. In high school, the idea was given to us again.

Now, I suppose that SOME schools might teach that gravity is a constant, independent of elevation, or anything else. I believe that most parents would want to keep their children far away from any such schools.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 3, Interesting) 770

by Runaway1956 (#47854483) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

You get some points there. But, I'll remain hung on this bit: " I have explained the expansion of the universe to many lay people without trouble."

If you explain something to 100 laymen, and more than 20% actually understand what you are talking about, then all is good. If another 30 or 60% understand parts of what you are talking about, that's good too. And, if I am among the remaining group that didn't understand a damned thing you said - then so be it. I can look around at my fellow laymen, and realize that they probably have more education and expertise in this area than I have.

If, however, less than 1% of those laymen can understand what you've explained, then we have problems. You might propose that your area of study is simply way over our heads. But, then, I might propose that your own understanding is insufficient to explain the relevancy of your studies.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 2) 770

by Runaway1956 (#47853987) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

Which aspect of the space shuttle are you interested in?

https://encrypted.google.com/s...

https://encrypted.google.com/s...

https://encrypted.google.com/s...

A similar search for climate change? Note that the first hit researches public opinion, the second hit claims it to be a fraud, the third appears to be a treatise on people's understanding modes - and so on.

https://encrypted.google.com/s...

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 4, Insightful) 770

by Runaway1956 (#47853907) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

I've never seen an MRI - but I have seen CAT scans. During my EMT training, I did my ER work at Bangor Regional Medical. I stood beside the doctor as he showed us exactly what he was looking for, and how he maneuvered through the "slides" - how the damaged areas differed from the undamaged areas of the brain.

While it is a far leap from my own level of inexpertise to the doctor's level of expertise, the doctor was both willing and able to show us laymen the value of the CAT scans.

The global warming people haven't shown us the value of anything, so far as I can see.

Comment: SOURCES YOU SAY!?!?! (Score 1) 770

by Runaway1956 (#47853577) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

That reminds me how everyone says wikipedia is no authority. Yet, I find it useful to visit the wiki, and to look at the citations. It's amazing what you can learn just by looking at them. If you actually click the links, and READ the source material cited, even the most educated people can learn something.

Yes, I often begin a search on Wikipedia, then look at the sources, then go in search of my own sources to either verify or refute what I found on the Wiki.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 2, Insightful) 770

by Runaway1956 (#47853405) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

And, there you have an important piece of the global warming puzzle that many seem to miss.

Kids in chemistry class may have problems understanding basic chemistry. But, the experiments are laid out, the theories, the laws, the hypothesis are all there - everything is made available so that a juvenile layman who is willing to make the effort might become a novice chemist. And, the learning continues through the second year of chemistry, right on through their college and/or university years.

Now - where can we find the layman's textbooks on manmade global warming?

Oh - we have to take the word of the "consensus". Interesting. As has already been pointed out, the moment one stops doing science, and begins to preach to the masses, one is no longer a scientist, but a politician. Or, a priest of the new religion of Global Warming.

Algol-60 surely must be regarded as the most important programming language yet developed. -- T. Cheatham

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