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Technology

Gartner Says 3D Printers Will Cost Less Than $2,000 By 2016 170

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-you-one dept.
colinneagle writes "Widespread adoption of 3D printing technology may not be that far away, according to a Gartner report predicting that enterprise-class 3D printers will be available for less than $2,000 by 2016. 3D printers are already in use among many businesses, from manufacturing to pharmaceuticals to consumers goods, and have generated a diverse set of use cases. As a result, the capabilities of the technology have evolved to meet customer needs, and will continue to develop to target those in additional markets, Gartner says."
Firefox

Emscripten and New Javascript Engine Bring Unreal Engine To Firefox 124

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the cycle-is-nearly-complete dept.
MojoKid writes "There's no doubt that gaming on the Web has improved dramatically in recent years, but Mozilla believes it has developed new technology that will deliver a big leap in what browser-based gaming can become. The company developed a highly-optimized version of Javascript that's designed to 'supercharge' a game's code to deliver near-native performance. And now that innovation has enabled Mozilla to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the browser. As a sort of proof of concept, Mozilla debuted this BananaBread game demo that was built using WebGL, Emscripten, and the new JavaScript version called 'asm.js.' Mozilla says that it's working with the likes of EA, Disney, and ZeptoLab to optimize games for the mobile Web, as well." Emscripten was previously used to port Doom to the browser.
Networking

Misconfigured Open DNS Resolvers Key To Massive DDoS Attacks 179

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the check-your-sources dept.
msm1267 writes with an excerpt From Threat Post: "While the big traffic numbers and the spat between Spamhaus and illicit webhost Cyberbunker are grabbing big headlines, the underlying and percolating issue at play here has to do with the open DNS resolvers being used to DDoS the spam-fighters from Switzerland. Open resolvers do not authenticate a packet-sender's IP address before a DNS reply is sent back. Therefore, an attacker that is able to spoof a victim's IP address can have a DNS request bombard the victim with a 100-to-1 ratio of traffic coming back to them versus what was requested. DNS amplification attacks such as these have been used lately by hacktivists, extortionists and blacklisted webhosts to great success." Running an open DNS resolver isn't itself always a problem, but it looks like people are enabling neither source address verification nor rate limiting.
The Media

What Does It Actually Cost To Publish a Scientific Paper? 166

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the one-trillion-dollars dept.
ananyo writes "Nature has published an investigation into the real costs of publishing research after delving into the secretive, murky world of science publishing. Few publishers (open access or otherwise-including Nature Publishing Group) would reveal their profit margins, but they've pieced together a picture of how much it really costs to publish a paper by talking to analysts and insiders. Quoting from the piece: '"The costs of research publishing can be much lower than people think," agrees Peter Binfield, co-founder of one of the newest open-access journals, PeerJ, and formerly a publisher at PLoS. But publishers of subscription journals insist that such views are misguided — born of a failure to appreciate the value they add to the papers they publish, and to the research community as a whole. They say that their commercial operations are in fact quite efficient, so that if a switch to open-access publishing led scientists to drive down fees by choosing cheaper journals, it would undermine important values such as editorial quality.' There's also a comment piece by three open access advocates setting out what they think needs to happen next to push forward the movement as well as a piece arguing that 'Objections to the Creative Commons attribution license are straw men raised by parties who want open access to be as closed as possible.'"
Security

When Your Data Absolutely, Positively has to be Destroyed (Video) 295

Posted by Roblimo
from the it's-all-about-the-magnetism dept.
Here's a corporate motto for you: "Destroying data since 1959." Timothy ran into a company called Garner Products (which doesn't use that motto as far as we know), at a security conference. While most exhibitors were busily preserving or encrypting data one way or another, Garner was not only destroying data but delighting in it. And yes, they've really been doing this since 1959; they started out degaussing broadcast cartridges so broadcasters could re-use them without worrying about old cue tones creeping into new recordings. Now, you might ask, "Instead of spending $9,000 or more to render hard drives useless, couldn't you just use a $24 sledge hammer? And have the fun of destroying something physical as a free bonus?" Yes, you could. You'd get healthy exercise as well, and if you only wanted to destroy the data on the hard drives, so what? New drives are cheap these days. But some government agencies and financial institutions require degaussing before the physical destruction (and Garner has machines that do physical destruction, too -- which is how they deal with SSDs). Garner Products President Ron Stofan says in the interview that their destruction process is more certain than shooting a hard drive with a .45. But neither he nor Tim demonstrated a shooting vs. degaussing test for us, so we remain skeptical.

Comment: PHBs love a good conspiracy theory (Score 1) 276

by Rsriram (#42373621) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Gently Keep Management From Wrecking a Project?

Convince the manager that bringing in too many external people before significant progress has been achieved will result in ideas/credit being stolen. Therefore it is important to keep it under the radar till success is clearly attributable to the PM and his team. In a highly hierarchical and political environment this should generally work. Worked for me in the past.

Comment: True in most cases (Score 1) 441

by Rsriram (#42024835) Attached to: It's Hard For Techies Over 40 To Stay Relevant, Says SAP Lab Director

In most cases by the time a person has completed 15 years in IT, they have moved on to a managerial or quasi-technical role which needs a good grounding in technology but not hands on technical knowledge necessarily. There are a small number of people in their forties who are still coding, but they run the risk of age discrimination if they need to change their job. Everyone, including US/Europe employers looks for high energy geeks who can spend additional time on the job without encumbrances like wife/kids/home far away/relocation issues. Some of these issues get sorted out naturally simply by way of what employees are willing to pay for "programmer", where the job is and what benefits are available. If you are 40 plus you will be at a salary level which will make many of the programmer jobs unattractive. Of course, there will be a small percentage (10%) who will continue to do this till they retire, but they will be in the small minority.

Comment: Why mention Friday the 13th? (Score 1) 241

by Rsriram (#39569599) Attached to: Neil deGrasse Tyson Outlines a Plan For Saving Earth From Asteroids

He mentions the date as Friday the 13th, April 2029. When the date is about 18 years from now, what was the need for mentioning that 13th is a Friday. Now instead of focusing on science, there will be a bunch of people who focus on Friday the 13th.

  |On Friday the 13th, April 2029, it will dip below the altitude of our communication satellites

Comment: follow the 'personal software process" (Score 1) 196

by Rsriram (#39401405) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Getting Feedback On Programming?

The Personal Software Process (PSP) is a structured software development process that is intended to help software engineers understand and improve their performance, by using a "disciplined, data-driven procedure".

It sounds a little esoteric for programmers who like to code and not collect any data, but in my experience, it works.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_software_process

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