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Comment: Govermental approval of bitcoins ? (Score 1) 232

by Rrraou (#47247115) Attached to: US To Auction 29,656 Bitcoins Seized From Silk Road
Doesn't this mean that the goverment officially approves of bitcoins ? I mean, if this was a drug bust they'd destroy the drugs. By selling them they're pretty much guaranteeing that if they ever move to make them illegal or undermine them in the US, this sale will come up as a precedent of Bitcoins being legally legit.

Comment: Re:Irresponsible or The sky is falling...again... (Score 1) 354

by Rrraou (#47157177) Attached to: 3D Printed Gun Maker Cody Wilson Defends Open Source Freedom
Gun regulations set the boundaries for gun ownership. 3d printed or not is irrelevant. If you're allowed to own an unregistered gun then 3d printing is not the problem you need to solve. Japan has already arrested someone for owning printed guns. Why ? Because unregistered guns are illegal there. Problem solved. 3d printed versions of guns are allways going to be lousy alternatives to anything an established factory can make. Here and now, if 3d printed guns had been used in any of the recent school shootings, the bodycount would have been somewhere between 1 and zero as they're basically one shot zip guns that use low power ammo and have a high probability of blowing the fingers off your hand if you're stupid enough to try firing one. The real danger of 3d printed guns at this time is the possibility that curious kids will download the plans, print one, then have one blow up on them as they try to shoot cans in a parking lot. When I was a kid, I made Ninja stars out of electrical panel disks I got from the hardware store, nothing bad happened, but it could have. 5 years from now when home 3d printing has evolved, high res metal printers will still cost the price of a small car or the equivalent tools in a machine shop, and home printing will still be plastic, rubber or wax used to make various plastic parts or knick knacks.

Comment: Re:Publishers are Dinosaurs. (Score 1) 405

Well, that's the rub isn't it... I have a friend trying to get published. There's a 3 year waiting list here before they even look at your book with no guarantee of being published. And by the time you are deemed worthy of recieving a decent contract with actual income attached, you're probably already well established enough that you don't need their help anyways. What we're going to see happen more and more often is people self publishing till they become high profile to the point of being noticed by the publishers who will cherry pick the easy wins and make them an offer. Publishers are a choke point at the moment. Self publishing means more crap gets published and reviews become an all important tool for sifting out the gems. Editors can be hired. Authors still need to promote their books. Publishers will need to step up their game if they want to justify taking 75% off the top instead of 30% like amazon.

Comment: Re:Proprietary materials? (Score 1) 85

by Rrraou (#47010431) Attached to: Autodesk Unveils 3d Printer As It Aims To Become Industry's Android
This is basically the same thing as my Form 1, which sells for around 3k (http://formlabs.com/products/form-1/). I'll be curious to see the build area on this because from the picture, the platform doesn't look all that big, though it's hard to tell size without a banana for scale. The huge resin tank is a nice feature at first glance to make sure you don't run out during a print, but keep in mind you want to be able to squeegee any misprints off the silicone at the bottom of the tank and use something like a comb to filter the occasional semi hardened globs from the liquid resin so having too much resin in there might result in a messier experience. With a good support generating system it's basically plug and print. and the 25 micron resolution is more than enough for me to print high detail 3d sculpts with great results. It's safe to assume autodesk will at least match or do better on this. Specifically, about materials, it's a lazer at (405nm is the number I remember) that solidifies the 0.25 micron layer between the build platform or the last layer printed, and the silicone at the bottom of the tank. Theoretically, if you can put a liquid in the tank that reacts appropriately to the correct lightwave, you can throw it in there and print with it. The only parts at risk would be the resin tank which is a consumable, and the build platform, which is also easily replaceable but much less likely to be damaged. On the forums, different 3rd party resins have been tried with varying success. The b9's cherry red being one of the better ones. Fails have mostly resulted in damaging the silicone in the resin tank, which can also be removed and replaced. I don't see any way this type of printer could possibly be limited to using proprietary resin. The Form 1 has exposure defaults for it's own resins and no way to add new ones so any third party resin maker would have conform to what's already there, but any similar printer that would allow you to vary exposure times based on resin suppliers specs should be abe to handle a wide variety of materials.

Never worry about theory as long as the machinery does what it's supposed to do. -- R. A. Heinlein

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