Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - Feds Bust a Dark-Web Counterfeit Coupon Kingpin->

Submitted by Sparrowvsrevolution
Sparrowvsrevolution writes: The dark web has become the go-to corner of the Internet to buy drugs, stolen financial data, guns...and counterfeit coupons for Clif bars and condoms?

On Thursday, the FBI indicted 30-year old Beauregard Wattigney, a Louisiana-based technician for ITT Technical Institute, on charges of wire fraud and trademark counterfeiting on the Dark Web marketplaces Silk Road and Silk Road 2. Wattigney is accused of being the online coupon kingpin known as ThePurpleLotus or TheGoldenLotus, who sold packages of coupons for virtually every consumer product imaginable including alcohol, cigarettes, cleaning supplies, beauty products, video games, and consumer electronics. The spoofed coupons—in most cases offering discounts just as effective as the real thing—were offered in packages that cost customers around $25 in bitcoin, but offered hundreds of dollars in total fraudulent discounts. Eventually he even sold a counterfeit coupon-making guide and access to a custom coupon-making fraud service.

The FBI accuses Wattigney of being responsible for more than $1 million total damages to the affected companies, which range from Sony to Crest to Kraft. But one fraud consultant who tracked Purple Lotus on the dark web for more than a year says the damage is likely far higher, in the tens of millions of dollars.

Link to Original Source

+ - SF Says AdWare Bundled with Gimp Is Intentional-> 5

Submitted by tresf
tresf writes: In response to a Google+ post from the Gimp project claiming that "[Sourceforge] is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP", Sourceforge had this response:

In cases where a project is no longer actively being maintained, SourceForge has in some cases established a mirror of releases that are hosted elsewhere. This was done for GIMP-Win.

Editor's note: Gimp is actively being maintained and the definition of "mirror" is quite misleading here as a modified binary is no longer a verbatim copy. Download statistics for Gimp on Windows show SourceForge as offering over 1,000 downloads per day of the Gimp software. In an official response to this incident, the official Gimp project team reminds users to use official download methods. Slashdotters may remember the last time news like this surfaced (2013) when the Gimp team decided to move downloads from SourceForge to their own FTP service.

Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for Windows via its official Downloads page.

Note: SourceForge and Slashdot share a corporate parent.
Link to Original Source

+ - IRS cut its cybersecurity staff by 11% over four years->

Submitted by dcblogs
dcblogs writes: The Internal Revenue Service, which disclosed this week the breach of 100,000 taxpayer accounts, has been steadily reducing the size of its internal cybersecurity staff as it increases its security spending. In 2011, the IRS employed 410 people in its cybersecurity organization, but by 2014 the headcount had fallen to 363 people. In 2012, the IRS earmarked $129 million for cybersecurity, which rose to $141.5 million last year, an increase of approximately 9.7%. This increase in spending, coupled with the reduction in headcount, is an indicator of outsourcing, said Alan Paller, director of research at the SANS Institute. Paller sees risks in that strategy. "Each organization moves at a different pace toward a point at which they have outsourced so much that the insiders do little more than manage contracts, and lose their technical expertise and ability to manage technical contractors effectively," he said.
Link to Original Source

+ - Sourceforge Staff Hijacks Gimp for Windows Account, Injects Adware->

Submitted by ourlovecanlastforeve
ourlovecanlastforeve writes: SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.
Link to Original Source

+ - SourceForge (owned by Slashdot Media) installs ads with GIMP-> 5

Submitted by careysb
careysb writes: SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.
Link to Original Source

+ - How Employers Get Out of Paying Their Workers

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: We love to talk about crime in America and usually the rhetoric is focused on the acts we can see: bank heists, stolen bicycles and cars, alleyway robberies. But Zachary Crockett writes at Pricenomics that wage theft one of the more widespread crimes in our country today — the non-payment of overtime hours, the failure to give workers a final check upon leaving a job, paying a worker less than minimum wage, or, most flagrantly, just flat out not paying a worker at all. Most commonly, wage theft comes in the form of overtime violations. In a 2008 study, the Center for Urban Economic Development surveyed 4,387 workers in low-wage industries and found that some 76% of full-time workers were not paid the legally required overtime rate by their employers and the average worker with a violation had put in 11 hours of overtime—hours that were either underpaid or not paid at all. Nearly a quarter of the workers in the sample came in early and/or stayed late after their shift during the previous work week. Of these workers, 70 percent did not receive any pay at all for the work they performed outside of their regular shift. In total, unfairly withheld wages in these three cities topped $3 billion. Generalizing this for the rest of the U.S.’s low-wage workforce (some 30 million people), researchers estimate that wage theft could be costing Americans upwards of $50 billion per year.

Last year, the Economic Policy Institute made what is, to date, the most ambitious attempt to quantify the extent of reported wage theft in the U.S.and determined that “the total amount of money recovered for the victims of wage theft who retained private lawyers or complained to federal or state agencies was at least $933 million.” Obviously, the nearly $1 billion collected is only the tip of the wage-theft iceberg, since most victims never sue and never complain to the government. Commissioner Su of California says wage theft has harmed not just low-wage workers. “My agency has found more wages being stolen from workers in California than any time in history,” says Su. “This has spread to multiple industries across many sectors. It’s affected not just minimum-wage workers, but also middle-class workers.”

+ - Intelligence officers given immunity from hacking laws, tribunal told->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: GCHQ staff have been given immunity from prosecution for hacking into computers, laptops and mobile phones under legislative changes that were never fully debated by parliament, a tribunal has been told.

The re-writing of a key clause of the Computer Misuse Act has exempted law enforcement officers from the prohibition on breaking into other people’s laptops, databases, mobile phones or digital systems. It came into force in March.

Addressing the Investigatory Powers Tribunal, which deals with complaints about the intelligence services and surveillance, lawyers for Privacy International said they had only been informed of the alteration earlier this week.

Link to Original Source

+ - The Solution to Argentina's Banking Problems Is Go Cashless

Submitted by dkatana
dkatana writes: There is no way back for Argentinian people to trust their own currency. Several governments have used the "Peso/Dollar" exchange to dig into people's savings, reward their friends and limit the freedom of citizens to use other currencies.

Short of Dollarizing the economy again the only solution for the country is going cashless. People are desperate and they are looking for alternatives as mobile payments, Amazon gift cards and Bitcoin to store their savings away from their government control. A digital currency could help curb black market exchanges, fight corruption and restore the country's image.

+ - After We're Gone: The Last Electrical Device Still Working 3

Submitted by Leomania
Leomania writes: After watching a post-apocalyptic Sci-Fi short on YouTube (there are quite a few) and then having our robot vacuum take off and start working the room, I just wondered what would be the last electric/electronic device still functioning if humans were suddenly gone. I don't mean sitting there with no power but would work if the power came back on; rather, something continuously powered, doing the task it was designed for. Are we talking a few years, decades, or far longer?

+ - Scientists Find Alarming Deterioration In DNA of the Urban Poor

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: Nico Pitney reports that the urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and that chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. Researchers analyzed telomeres, tiny caps at the ends of DNA strands that protect cells from aging prematurely, of poor and lower middle-class black, white, and Mexican residents of Detroit and found that low-income residents of Detroit, regardless of race, have significantly shorter telomeres than the national average. "There are effects of living in high-poverty, racially segregated neighborhoods — the life experiences people have, the physical exposures, a whole range of things — that are just not good for your health," says Nobel laureate. Dr. Arline Geronimus, the lead author of the study, described as the most rigorous research of its kind examining how "structurally rooted social processes work through biological mechanisms to impact health." White Detroit residents who were lower-middle-class had the longest telomeres in the study. But the shortest telomeres belonged to poor whites. Black residents had about the same telomere lengths regardless of whether they were poor or lower-middle-class. And poor Mexicans actually had longer telomeres than Mexicans with higher incomes. Geronimus says these findings demonstrate the limitations of standard measures — like race, income and education level — typically used to examine health disparities. "We've relied on them too much to be the signifiers of everything that varies in the life experiences of difference racial or ethnic groups in different geographic locations and circumstances."

One co-author of this new study is Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn who helped to discover telomeres, an achievement that won her the Nobel Prize in physiology in 2009. Blackburn ticked off a list of studies in which people's experiences and perceptions directly correlated with their telomere lengths: whether people say they feel stressed or pessimistic; whether they feel racial discrimination towards others or feel discriminated against; whether they have experienced severely negative experiences in childhood, and so on. "These are all really adding up in this quantitative way," says Blackburn. "Once you get a quantitative relationship, then this is science, right?"

Comment: Re:"Do more with less" (Score 1) 405

"My phone plugs into a wall, so that's your responsibility too. You need to be available by phone in case our Sales department in Germany has any problems. Oh, and we need to have you come to the morning meetings every day to explain why the Windows update broke Exchange and why we haven't upgraded to Windows 8 yet - we're supposed to be cutting edge! By the way, our website is loading slow and we need you to figure out why. And we want to fire Larry - we're pretty sure he surfs porn sites on his lunch, so go ahead and dig something up. Oh, our vendor for is charging us too much, so you'll have to clean up the database yourself. Don't worry - we'll get you help, the janitor has just started ITT."

I won't, but I could, go on.

That being said, my wife is also a professional and her job is pretty stressful too. Of course, she makes considerably more and actually gets some time off once in awhile, but the stress is there.

Comment: Re:Why do companies keep thinking people *want* th (Score 1) 125

by RoknrolZombie (#49634469) Attached to: Ubuntu May Beat Windows 10 To Phone-PC Convergence After All

No. Just because it's listed last doesn't mean it's my lowest priority. Way to go for false assumptions, though, it almost sounds like you have a brain.

Privacy is listed last because it's the least likely thing for me to get. If it were a dealbreaker I would already not have a phone.

+ - AT&T bills 83-yr old customer $24,298.93 for landline dial-up service->

Submitted by McGruber
McGruber writes: 83-year-old Woodland Hills, California resident Ron Dorff usually pays $51 a month to AT&T for a landline, which he uses to access the Internet via an old-school, low-speed AOL dial-up subscription.... but then, in March, AT&T sent him a bill for $8,596.57. He called AT&T and their service rep couldn't make heads or tails of the bill, so she said she'd send a technician to his house. None came, so Dorff figured that everything was ok.

Dorff's next monthly bill was for $15,687.64, bringing his total outstanding debt to AT&T, including late fees, to $24,298.93. If he didn't pay by May 8, AT&T warned, his bill would rise to at least $24,786.16. Droff then called David Lazarus, business columnist for the LA Times, who got in touch with AT&T, who wasted little time in deciding it would waive the more than $24,000 in charges.

AT&T spokeshole Georgia Taylor claims Dorff's modem somehow had started dialing a long-distance number when it accessed AOL, and the per-minute charges went into orbit as he stayed connected for hours.

AT&T declined to answer the LA Times questions about why AT&T didn't spot the problem itself and proactively take steps to fix things? AT&T also declined to elaborate on whether AT&T's billing system is capable of spotting unusual charges and, if so, why it doesn't routinely do so.

Link to Original Source

+ - What will our Universe's very last star look like?

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang writes: While it might seem like there are an endless supply of stars in the Universe, the process that powers each and every one requires fuel to burn. At some point — even though it’s far in the future — that fuel will all be spent, and all we’ll be left with are stellar corpses of various types. But the Universe is full of second chances, and opportunities to bring not only burned-out stars back to life, but to give life to the failed stars-that-never-were. Of all the possibilities out there, what’s going to give rise to the very last light in the Universe? The smart money is on colliding and merging (but not inspiraling) failed stars known as brown dwarfs.

Wherever you go...There you are. - Buckaroo Banzai

Working...