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+ - Does Internet.org Leave Latin Americans Without A Real Internet?->

Submitted by stephendavion
stephendavion writes: During the VII Summit of the Americas held in Panama from 10 to 11 April, presidents from several Latin American countries, including the Panamanian host Juan Carlos Varela, Cristina Fernandez of Argentina, Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, and Ollanta Humala of Peru posed for a photo with a special guest: Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook and spokesperson for Internet.org. Internet.org is a project led by Facebook that brings together technology companies, NGOs and local communities, with the aim, as advertised on their website, of connecting "two thirds of the world without access to the network." Joining Facebook are companies like Nokia, Ericsson, Qualcomm, and Samsung, collaborating on a joint project to create and distribute tools and services that provide free basic services in markets where Internet access may be less affordable.
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+ - AMD Publishes New "AMDGPU" Linux Graphics Driver->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: AMD has made available its new AMDGPU Linux graphics driver comprised of a brand new DRM/KMS kernel driver, a new xf86-video-amdgpu X11 driver, and modifications to libdrm and Gallium3D. This new AMDGPU driver is designed for supporting AMD's next-generation hardware with no support differences for currently supported Radeon GPUs. While yet to be released, this new AMDGPU driver is the critical piece to the new unified driver strategy with Catalyst where their high performance proprietary driver will now become limited to being a user-space binary component that uses this open-source kernel driver.
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Comment: Re: 1 million dollars per family? (Score 1) 536

And the brand new $30k car (that you have to get a loan for) will last you much longer than the $500 beater that you can afford this week - what's your point? Come up with a better system and people will use it.

People talk about how expensive everything is, but I don't see anyone volunteering to take pay cuts to make what they produce (even if what they produce is labor) less expensive. It's almost as though other people value their time as much as you value yours.

+ - DIA Polygraph Countermeasure Case Files Leaked

Submitted by George Maschke
George Maschke writes: AntiPolygraph.org (of which I am a co-founder) has published a set of leaked Defense Intelligence Agency polygraph countermeasure case files along with a case-by-case analysis. The case files, which include polygraph charts and the exact questions used, suggest that the only people being "caught" trying to beat the polygraph are those using crude, unsophisticated methods that anyone who actually understood polygraph procedure and effective countermeasures (like, say, a real spy, saboteur, or terrorist) would ever use. AntiPolygraph.org has previously published polygraph community training materials on countermeasures that indicate they lack the ability to detect countermeasures like those described in our free book, The Lie Behind the Lie Detector (PDF) or in former police polygraph examiner Doug Williams' manual, How to Sting the Polygraph . Williams, who was indicted last year after teaching undercover federal agents how to pass a polygraph, is scheduled to stand trial on May 12 in Oklahoma City.

+ - Hacked Sony emails reveal that Sony had pirated books about hacking->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Sony has done a lot of aggressive anti-piracy work in their time, which makes it that much funnier that pirated ebooks were found on their servers from the 2014 hacks that just went on to WikiLeaks. Better yet, the pirated books are educational books about hacking called "Inside Cyber Warfare" and "Hacking the Next Generation" from O'Reilly publishers.
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+ - Twitter moves non-US accounts to Ireland away from the NSA-> 1

Submitted by Mark Wilson
Mark Wilson writes: Twitter has updated its privacy policy, creating a two-lane service that treats US and non-US users differently. If you live in the US, your account is controlled by San Francisco-based Twitter Inc, but if you're elsewhere in the world (anywhere else) it's handled by Twitter International Company in Dublin, Ireland. The changes also affect Periscope.

What's the significance of this? Twitter Inc is governed by US law, it is obliged to comply with NSA-driven court requests for data. Data stored in Ireland is not subject to the same obligation. Twitter is not alone in using Dublin as a base for non-US operations; Facebook is another company that has adopted the same tactic. The move could also have implications for how advertising is handled in the future.

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+ - Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 writes: For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet.

In the realm of law enforcement, iris recognition could be used to identify suspects at long range in various lighting conditions. The system can even be used to capture images through reflections in a mirror.

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Comment: Relevant results (Score 1) 3

by RoknrolZombie (#49495521) Attached to: What features would you like in a search engine?

In the early days of the neterwebz most of your search results were pretty relevant if you used the correct terms. The world moves really quickly though - and I have been encountering a particular problem where my returned results are relevant...if I'm asking the question 8 years ago. Technology is the worst, but I've even come across medical information that is "woefully" out of date only 3 years later, but because they're being hosted on a more popular site they "become" the popular source, even if they're wrong. Not sure how you could accomplish that part...the next suggestion should be easier.

How about being able to blacklist some sites from your search results? There are forum farms out there that are useless for answering questions, yet because of the way they game the system they are returned high on most searches - find a way to kill those fuckers and you're off to a decent start.

I don't care if you have to set a cookie as long as I can see it and know what it contains. You don't need to know anything about me to know that I don't like bullshit websites

+ - Leaked Sony Contract Reveals Hollywood's Netflix Geo-Blocking Requirements->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Michael Geist has uncovered Hollywood's geo-blocking requirements that imposes on Netflix in its content licensing agreements. Included with the Sony documents posted by Wikileaks, the contractual provision requires Netflix to use geo-blocking technologies. However, it is only required to target VPNs and anonymizers that "have been created for the primary intent of bypassing geo-restrictions." Moreover, Sony was forced to admit that "geolocation and geofiltering technologies may in some cases be circumvented by highly proficient and determined individuals or organizations."
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+ - The Hidden FM Radio Inside Your Pocket->

Submitted by mr crypto
mr crypto writes: Data providers would probably prefer you not know that most smart phones contain an FM chip that lets you listen to broadcasts for free: "But the FM chip is not activated on two-thirds of devices. That's because mobile makers have the FM capability switched off." The National Association of Broadcasters, National Public Radio, and American Public Media — have launched a lobbying campaign to get those radios switched on.
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