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Submission + - Bethesda To Unleash Hell On May 13th, Doom Release Date Confirmed In Trailer (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Bethesda and id Software are in the process rebooting the Doom franchise and it seems like it's been in development for ages. When we last visited the upcoming Doom remake, Bethesda had posted a giblet-filled trailer which showed some pretty impressive gameplay visuals, killer hand-to-hand combat and plenty of head stomping. Today, Bethesda clued gamers in on something that Doom fans have been anticipating for years, an actual release date. Mark your calendars for May 13th, because that's when Doom will be available for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and of course, the PC platform. Bethesda also dropped a new campaign trailer for you to ogle over.

Submission + - Trees, regardless of size, all break at the same wind speed. Here's why. (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: When a cyclone named Klaus tore across southwestern France in January 2009, it highlighted a strange phenomenon: Trees, regardless of their diameter, height, or elastic properties, don’t tend to break until wind speeds reach about 42 m/s (94 mph). This seemingly odd convergence has actually been observed by several historical scientists, including Galileo and Leonardo de Vinci, both of whom suggested that a mathematical law could explain the resistance of wooden beams under stress. Now, using data from a new experiment, scientists say they have found that law.

Submission + - All 12 Countries Sign off on the TPP (freezenet.ca)

Dangerous_Minds writes: News is surfacing that the TPP has officially been signed by all 12 countries. This marks the beginning of the final step towards ratification. Freezenet has a quick rundown of what copyright provisions are contained in the agreement including traffic shaping, site blocking, enforcement of copyright when infringement is "imminent", and a government mandate for ISPs to install backdoors for the purpose of tracking copyright infringement on the Internet.

Submission + - AI Is Transforming Google Search. The Rest of the Web Is Next

catchblue22 writes: Yesterday, the 46-year-old Google veteran who oversees its search engine, Amit Singhal, announced his retirement. For much of his tenure, Singhai believed that Google’s search engine should be driven by algorithms based on definite rules that automatically generate a response to each query. His replacement, John Giannandrea is a proponent of using deep learning instead of hard coded algorithms; the "RankBrain" project uses deep neural networks to produce search results. Some at engineers at Google have shown skepticism of using neural networks for search: "...it’s hard to explain and ascertain why a particular search result ranks more highly than another result for a given query...It’s difficult to directly tweak a machine learning-based system to boost the importance of certain signals over others.”

Giannandrea's appointment shows that deep learning has arrived at Google Search. "By building learning systems, we don’t have to write these rules anymore...Increasingly, we’re discovering that if we can learn things rather than writing code, we can scale these things much better.”

Submission + - Google starts blocking sites with fake download buttons (blogspot.co.uk) 1

Kobun writes: Google is now rolling out automatic blocking of websites that use fake download buttons or deceptive ads to trick users into downloading Malware. The original blog post from Google can be found here, with additional commentary at Ars and Gizmodo. CNET and Sourceforge are mentioned by name in the Ars article, although this doesn't take into account SourceForge's recent sale and the subsequent reversal of their malware-distribution policy.

Submission + - SPAM: TSA Scores 95% on Airport Breach Tests Failures

cmarkn writes: Homeland Security agents posing as passengers were able get weapons past TSA agents in 67 out of 70 tests—a 95 percent failure rate, according to agency officials. The acting head of the Transportation Security Administration has been reassigned.

"The numbers in these reports never look good out of context, but they are a critical element in the continual evolution of our aviation security," Homeland Security officials said in a statement. They didn't mention what context could make this look good.

This isn't the first time TSA officers have failed to detect fake terrorists and their weapons. However, this time, TSA agents reached a new low, failing to detect almost everything. But at least they're protecting us from cannolis being carried onto planes.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Netflix Is Experimenting with Advertising (vice.com)

derekmead writes: Netflix is experimenting with advertisements that run both before and after users watch a video. It's unclear whether or not the company will eventually push ads to everyone.

For now, the company is primarily experimenting with the HBO model of pitching its own original programming to viewers. The company is only showing trailers for shows like Orange Is the New Black and House of Cards—it has not attempted to sell third party ads, and the company told me that, for the moment, only specific users in specific markets are seeing ads.

Submission + - Body Cam clears Police Officer .. (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The young woman in the video attempts to set the officer up by using her phone to record an audio only performance meant to make it appear as though he was acting inappropriately. She was attempting to ‘flip the script’. What she failed to realize is that the entire thing, including her devious performance, were recorded.

Submission + - How Little It Cost To Bribe Senators To FastTrack TPP Bill (zerohedge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It took just a few days after the stunning defeat of Obama's attempt to fast-track the Trans Pacific Partnership bill in the Senate at the hands of his own Democratic party, before everything returned back to normal and the TPP fast-track was promptly passed. Why? The simple answer: money. Or rather, even more money.

Submission + - SourceForge Joins the Bundle Wagon

An anonymous reader writes: The irony of submitting this on /. is not lost on me.
http://arstechnica.com/informa...
"Apparently, SourceForge's mysterious "sf-editor1" has also claimed ownership of a number of other accounts for open source and other software projects."
SF is claiming ownership of these projects for the specious reason of them being "abandoned" when in fact these project simply stopped using SF (apparently for good reason).

Submission + - Feds Bust a Dark-Web Counterfeit Coupon Kingpin (wired.com)

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: The dark web has become the go-to corner of the Internet to buy drugs, stolen financial data, guns...and counterfeit coupons for Clif bars and condoms?

On Thursday, the FBI indicted 30-year old Beauregard Wattigney, a Louisiana-based technician for ITT Technical Institute, on charges of wire fraud and trademark counterfeiting on the Dark Web marketplaces Silk Road and Silk Road 2. Wattigney is accused of being the online coupon kingpin known as ThePurpleLotus or TheGoldenLotus, who sold packages of coupons for virtually every consumer product imaginable including alcohol, cigarettes, cleaning supplies, beauty products, video games, and consumer electronics. The spoofed coupons—in most cases offering discounts just as effective as the real thing—were offered in packages that cost customers around $25 in bitcoin, but offered hundreds of dollars in total fraudulent discounts. Eventually he even sold a counterfeit coupon-making guide and access to a custom coupon-making fraud service.

The FBI accuses Wattigney of being responsible for more than $1 million total damages to the affected companies, which range from Sony to Crest to Kraft. But one fraud consultant who tracked Purple Lotus on the dark web for more than a year says the damage is likely far higher, in the tens of millions of dollars.

Submission + - SF Says AdWare Bundled with Gimp Is Intentional (google.com) 5

tresf writes: In response to a Google+ post from the Gimp project claiming that "[Sourceforge] is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP", Sourceforge had this response:

In cases where a project is no longer actively being maintained, SourceForge has in some cases established a mirror of releases that are hosted elsewhere. This was done for GIMP-Win.

Editor's note: Gimp is actively being maintained and the definition of "mirror" is quite misleading here as a modified binary is no longer a verbatim copy. Download statistics for Gimp on Windows show SourceForge as offering over 1,000 downloads per day of the Gimp software. In an official response to this incident, the official Gimp project team reminds users to use official download methods. Slashdotters may remember the last time news like this surfaced (2013) when the Gimp team decided to move downloads from SourceForge to their own FTP service.

Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for Windows via its official Downloads page.

Note: SourceForge and Slashdot share a corporate parent.

Submission + - IRS cut its cybersecurity staff by 11% over four years (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: The Internal Revenue Service, which disclosed this week the breach of 100,000 taxpayer accounts, has been steadily reducing the size of its internal cybersecurity staff as it increases its security spending. In 2011, the IRS employed 410 people in its cybersecurity organization, but by 2014 the headcount had fallen to 363 people. In 2012, the IRS earmarked $129 million for cybersecurity, which rose to $141.5 million last year, an increase of approximately 9.7%. This increase in spending, coupled with the reduction in headcount, is an indicator of outsourcing, said Alan Paller, director of research at the SANS Institute. Paller sees risks in that strategy. "Each organization moves at a different pace toward a point at which they have outsourced so much that the insiders do little more than manage contracts, and lose their technical expertise and ability to manage technical contractors effectively," he said.

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