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Comment Sounds like a pretty good argument... (Score 3, Insightful) 132

Sounds like a pretty good argument for taking the federal government out of education entirely.

Centralized mind control through propaganda; acculturation of our nation's youth to silence, oppression, and acquiescence to authority; normalization of the police state; blind nationalism through a fantastic daily "pledge." All of these things are strong counterarguments to the "fair and equal opportunity/better education for all " kind of rhetoric that comes out of Washington.

Seriously, think of the children. Think of all the misguided ideas their heads will be filled with. Think of the cultural values they will be taught to cherish and those they will be taught to revile. Think of the world they will grow up to accept or even create.

Whatever happened to civics class?

Teach your children well... and keep them far, far away from federally funded schools.

Comment Re:I disagree with the premise (Score 1) 402

The article fails to discuss what it thinks "bad UI/UX design" is or to mention any specific open source projects that incorporate it.

I, too, disagree with the premise. However, I will go further and suggest that there is more than merely "anti-open source bias" at work here. The article is so shallow and so baseless that it seems designed to trick as many hapless Slashdotters as it can into accepting the premise without reading TFA--and little else.

This article propagates the idea that open-source UI is bad, despite presenting zero evidence to that effect. It has a cute and catchy title "Open Source Is Ugly" and then fails to address the basic points of that claim: what an ugly UI is and how open source fits that definition. Thus, the article is seemingly nothing more than astroturf. In this forum I am surprised more haven't called this out.

Comment This again? (Score 1) 519

The Web was a fine place before there were advertisements on the Web.

If you ever wanted to put a site up on the Web, then you always knew that visitors to your site could read it through a browser capable of parsing its content and displaying it however the visitor wanted to view it. The Web has been like this since the very beginning--it was designed that way.

Crying over it is like crying over gravity. This is the reality we live in. Deal with it.

Ad-supported "content" is never as good as the information disseminated by ordinary folks who are posting on the Web for personal and non-monetary edification. Anything that is worth being said without ad revenue attached is just more worth listening to. If you need the ad revenue to make your posts worth it, perhaps you are posting for the wrong reason.

Disclaimer: I use Adblock Plus and I have for nearly a decade now.

Comment At the risk of getting downvoted into oblivion... (Score 3, Insightful) 290

Who the fuck cares about Facebook?

Facebook is a despicable company that doesn't have even a basic level of respect for its users. This has been readily apparent to anyone who has been willing to look for the better part of a decade. You want to be a part of that? Go right ahead. Just don't act all indignant when they arbitrarily lock your account or sell the data they have on you to corporations or the government.

Furthermore, likening Facebook to a public square is just silly. Public squares don't fight for your clicks by targeting you with advertisements. Public squares won't track every move you make on the Internet after you leave. And, most relevant of all, public squares are places where it's perfectly acceptable to remain anonymous through the use of any pseudonym you can dream up.

I say let Facebook do whatever they want. The more egregious the abuse, the more likely another clueless user will wake up and boycott that shit.

Comment Re:In other news (Score 1) 255

I've been dual homepaging Slashdot and Soylent for the last few months. The stories over at Soylent tend to be more on-topic, and the story selection process is completely transparent.

I encourage you (and everyone else) to continue to give Soylent a chance. As far as I can tell the community is 100% Slashdot refugees. If Slashdotters continue to jump over, which seems to be the trend, we just might get a good portion of our community back together free of our evil corporate overlords. And I, for one, welcome that outcome.

Submission + - Musician Releases Album of Music to Code By (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: Music and programming go hand-in-keyboard. And now programmer/musician Carl Franklin has released an album of music he wrote specifically for use as background music when writing software. 'The biggest challenge was dialing back my instinct to make real music,' Franklin told ITworld's Phil Johnson. 'This had to fade into the background. It couldn't distract the listener, but it couldn't be boring either. That was a particular challenge that I think most musicians would have found maddening.'

Submission + - House Passes Bill That Prevents Scientists From Advising EPA (inhabitat.com)

Roger Wilcox writes: While everyone’s attention was focused on the Senate and the Keystone XL decision on Tuesday, some pretty shocking stuff was quietly going on in the House of Representatives. The GOP-dominated House passed a bill that effectively prevents scientists who are peer-reviewed experts in their field from providing advice — directly or indirectly — to the EPA, while at the same time allowing industry representatives with financial interests in fossil fuels to have their say. Perversely, all this is being done in the name of “transparency.”

Comment Re:Guy allegedly does something stupid (Score -1, Redundant) 327

The problem is that SWAT is prevalent enough that punks like the guy in the article can even pull this kind of prank.

SWAT came into prominence in the 1970s, with ~500 SWAT deployments per year. Today, there are more than 50,000 SWAT deployments each year (that's more that 150 deployments every day) and mostly, they are used to round up non-violent people engaging in consensual crimes.

There is no justification for using paramilitary police action on non-violent petty crime. It is ridiculous: picture an 8-man armored squad busting in on a teenager smoking weed in his parent's basement. There have been dozens of tragic incidents in which innocents have lost their lives due to this excessive use of force.

I don't have a solution to this. Politicians appear to consider the issue a career-danger to themselves to address; seemingly nobody is moving anywhere fast to rectify this trend. However, it has clearly become a problem.

Comment Re:Guy allegedly does something stupid (Score 5, Insightful) 327

The problem is that SWAT is prevalent enough that punks like the guy in the article can even pull this kind of prank. SWAT came into prominence in the 1970s, with ~500 SWAT deployments per year. Today, there are more than 50,000 SWAT deployments each year (that's more that 150 deployments every day) and mostly, they are used to round up non-violent people engaging in consensual crimes. There is no justification for using paramilitary police action on non-violent petty crime. It is ridiculous: picture an 8-man armored squad busting in on a teenager smoking weed in his parent's basement. There have been dozens of tragic incidents in which innocents have lost their lives due to this excessive use of force. I don't have a solution to this. Politicians appear to consider the issue a career-danger to themselves to address; seemingly nobody is moving anywhere fast to rectify this trend. However, it has clearly become a problem.

Comment Re:Security is a yes/no question (Score 1) 431

You seem to have missed the word "covert" in the GP post.

His point was that government simply cannot encourage secure communication among its citizenry and also expect to have covert access to all of that communication. Secure communication and dragnet surveillance are mutually exclusive concepts for the government's purposes. Unfortunately, our overlords have chosen to attempt to limit the security of our communication in order to realize their goal of capturing all our base in their dragnets.

Comment Re:I don't get it (Score 4, Insightful) 127

I've been convinced for some time now that Jesse Jackson and his ilk do not truly represent the people they claim to stand for. Their position on this issue makes absolutely no sense.

The only feasible explanation I can imagine is that they are abusing the trust of the gullible in an attempt bring the force of public opinion down against Title II designation for broadband.

Title II seems the sanest answer available for our current situation, as we have seen it succeed at reigning in other natural monopolies for 80 years at this point. Why this push didn't come 15 years ago is a mystery to me.


Aside: the fact that this is part of the conversation all of a sudden means that the man behind the propaganda curtain is now actively trying to influence *your* thoughts on the issue. Watch carefully to see how they paint this across the media.

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