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Submission + - RIP: Prolific Amazon customer reviewer Harriet Klausner (1952-2015) (

Robotech_Master writes: Prolific Amazon customer reviewer Harriet Klausner passed away last week at the age of 67. Klausner was a controversial figure: She never gave anything a negative review, her review blurbs cast doubt on how closely she actually read what she reviewed, and received dozens of free books per week (which ended up resold on via her son's account). Nonetheless, for a time she was one of the most recognizable names to any frequent customer; it was rare to come across any popular title that didn't have a Klausner review.

Submission + - $50 Fire tablet with high-capacity SDXC slot doesn't see e-books on the SD card 1

Robotech_Master writes: For all that the $50 Fire has a 128 GB capable SDXC card slot that outclasses every other tablet in its price range, and it evolved out of Amazon's flagship e-book reader, it strangely lacks the ability to index e-books on that card. This seems like a strange oversight, given that every other media app on the tablet uses that card for downloading and storage, and its 5 GB usable internal memory isn't a lot for people who have a large library of picture-heavy e-books—especially if they want to install other apps, too.

Submission + - The Last Unicorn, other Peter S. Beagle titles hit Kindle October 1

Robotech_Master writes: Peter S. Beagle's publisher Connor Cochran has announced that fan favorite The Last Unicorn and several other titles by Beagle will be available in e-book form from Amazon as of October 1. Apart from a brief sale via The Humble Bundle, this will mark the first time an authorized e-book edition of The Last Unicorn has ever been available for sale. It will be offered in both a "Classic" edition and a "Deluxe" edition, featuring sequel novella "Two Hearts" and an interview with Beagle.

Submission + - The Public Collection: Indianapolis's own 'Big Free Libraries' (

Robotech_Master writes: Indianapolis has just launched a great new series of art installations intended to promote both art and literacy. The Public Collection will act as a sort of artistic big version of the "Little Free Libraries" that have been popping up lately—offering hundreds of books to the general public, including homeless and hospital patients, absolutely free.

Submission + - Designers & Dragons is the complete history of role-playing game publishers

Robotech_Master writes: Evil Hat Productions is Kickstarting a four-volume history of the RPG industry that's already met its funding goal almost seven times over. Comprising half a million words altogether, it tells the story of pencil-and-paper role-playing games from their very beginnings, and you can read the e-book of the first volume for kicking in just one buck. $1 for the first e-book, $15 for all four, print volumes starting at $25 and up.

I've reviewed the first volume of it here. I found it extremely thorough and well-written.

Submission + - Donate $20 to help Haiti, get $1481 in RPGs (

Robotech_Master writes: Digital RPG vendor DriveThruRPG is offering $1481 in cover price of RPG e-content in exchange for a $20 donation to Doctors Without Borders. (DriveThru is also matching $5 and $10 donations.) The content includes many popular indy RPGs, as well as the Firefly RPG, 'Serenity', that would cost $30 all by itself. Due to high load on DriveThruRPG's servers, downloads are being delayed to up to 3 business days after the donation. Still, it's a great deal for any gamer—even those who otherwise couldn't care less about the Haiti earthquake. At time of submission, DriveThruRPG has raised just over $75,000 so far.

Submission + - Africa: CherryPal's $99 "odd lots" netbook (

Robotech_Master writes: CherryPal, which Slashdot last covered back in 2008, has released a $99 netbook, the Africa, aimed at the developing world but (unlike the OLPC) available for sale to the consumer. But unlike most netbooks, the Africa is not actually made to a set design. Instead, it uses a hacker-like approach similar to the way home PC builders build their cheap beige boxes. CherryPal purchases odd lots of whatever components are available most inexpensively, builds netbooks out of them, and calls them Africas. The resulting machines will at least meet and may exceed the minimum specs given on CherryPal's website, and may be built around an ARM, MIPS, or X86-based CPU depending on what parts CherryPal has on hand at the time. The device ships with 'at least' Windows CE or CherryPal's custom 'Green Maraschino' Debian-based Linux distro.

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