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Study Says Your Personality Doesn't Change After 1st Grade 221

Posted by samzenpus
from the everybody-I-ever-needed-to-be-I-was-in-first-grade dept.
A study authored by Christopher Nave, a doctoral candidate at the University of California, says that our personalities stay pretty much the same from early childhood all the way through old age. From the article: "Using data from a 1960s study of approximately 2,400 ethnically diverse schoolchildren (grades 1 - 6) in Hawaii, researchers compared teacher personality ratings of the students with videotaped interviews of 144 of those individuals 40 years later. They examined four personality attributes - talkativeness (called verbal fluency), adaptability (cope well with new situations), impulsiveness and self-minimizing behavior (essentially being humble to the point of minimizing one's importance)." This must explain my overriding need to be first captain when we pick kickball teams at the office.
Earth

Abandon Earth Or Die, Warns Hawking 973

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i'm-going-home dept.
siliconbits writes "According to famed theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, it's time to free ourselves from Mother Earth. 'I believe that the long-term future of the human race must be in space,' Hawking tells Big Think. 'It will be difficult enough to avoid disaster on planet Earth in the next hundred years, let alone the next thousand, or million. The human race shouldn't have all its eggs in one basket, or on one planet. Let's hope we can avoid dropping the basket until we have spread the load.'"
The Internet

The 'Net Generation' Isn't 435

Posted by kdawson
from the hanging-with-the-peeps dept.
Kanel introduces this lengthy review in Spiegel Online this way: "Kids that grew up with the Internet are not 'digital natives' as consultants have led us to believe. They're OK with the Net but they don't care much about Web 2.0 and find plenty of other things more important than the Internet. Consultants and authors, mostly old guys, have called for the education system to be reworked to suit this new generation, but they never conducted surveys to see if the members of 'generation @' were anything like what they had envisioned. Turns out, children who have known the Net their whole lives are not particularly skilled at it, nor do they live their lives online." "Young people have now reached this turning point. The Internet is no longer something they are willing to waste time thinking about. It seems that the excitement about cyberspace was a phenomenon peculiar to their predecessors, the technology-obsessed first generation of Web users. ...they certainly no longer understand it when older generations speak of 'going online.' ... Tom and his friends just describe themselves as being 'on' or 'off,' using the English terms. What they mean is: contactable or not."

Comment: Re:If they thrive on predicatable, monotonous work (Score 1) 419

by Robert Larson (#30445182) Attached to: Company Trains the Autistic To Test Software
Things get better. As others have said in this thread Autism is viewed, at least in part, as a developmental disorder. My son, who is diagnosed with "High Functioning Autism" often strikes me has having the intellect of someone 1 or 2 years older than him and the emotional intelligence/behavior of someone 3 or 4 years younger than him. This leads to socially awkward moments when dealing with peers. He actually gets along quite well with younger kids. As he ages he keeps maturing, but he's just behind his peers. My daughter is PDD-NOS which is just the big "other" category on the spectrum. She's a bit learning delayed. She's oppositional. The key to success with both kids has been to find the right program/teachers. Teachers need to have autism training to know how to teach these kids. At one of the earlier schools we attended the principal actually suspended my son for a day for acting out. Later we were able to point the principal in the direction of some good autism training and now they know better how to deal with this situation. It does get easier. You need to adapt. It's not your child's fault their autistic and it's not yours (beyond genetics anyway). You need to learn new parenting skills. You need to take respite when you can. Most importantly, you need to find a support network. Other parents of autistic kids are a great resource. There's a Dad's group in my area (there a lot more rare than the Mom's groups it seems). Remember autism is a spectrum disorder. Starting with completely non-verbal nearly comatose people all the way up to people who might just be described as nerdy. Bill Gates, Isaac Newton, Einstein all had at least some of the signs of being on the spectrum. I think if you start looking at any highly successful person (Tiger Woods & Bill Clinton are springing to mind at the moment) you start to realize that they show some signs too. Non-autistics are called Neuro-Typicals (NT). I'e come to believe that NTs really are just that: typical. To be extraordinary, you are, by definition, not-typical. You have quirks. How many quirks and how large lead to your diagnosis along the spectrum. I think all men are created autistic. Some are just more autistic than others.

Comment: Re:If they thrive on predicatable, monotonous work (Score 1) 419

by Robert Larson (#30398174) Attached to: Company Trains the Autistic To Test Software
Sorry for being obnoxious. I guess that's the Asperger's talking. :) As for Bill Gates. He's commonly cited as being a fairly clear example of a very high-functioning (obviously) spectrum resident. I've been in a room with him. I've watched him do his rocking thing and several other tics. Maybe it's like gaydar... you have to be one to know one. And I wasn't mentioning it as any sort of criticism. As several recent Wired articles have pointed out, Autistics are going to be in high demand in the future due to our ability to focus on repetitive tasks, enhanced analytic and observation skills, etc. Most people in IT are somewhere on the spectrum because those traits are rewarded within IT.

Comment: Re:If they thrive on predicatable, monotonous work (Score 1) 419

by Robert Larson (#30398144) Attached to: Company Trains the Autistic To Test Software
Well far be it for me to critique the Wikipedia, but Autism is a spectrum disorder. Hence the term, ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) that it goes by. I for instance have Aspergers. My son has HFA (High Functioning Autism) and my daughter has PDD-NOS. But, no, I probably don't know anything about it. Thanks for that. Fail. BTW, sorry if this comes across as socially awkward. Cause, ya know, there's that.

Comment: Re:If they thrive on predicatable, monotonous work (Score 1, Interesting) 419

by Robert Larson (#30385198) Attached to: Company Trains the Autistic To Test Software
What neurotypical folks may fail to realize is that Autism is a spectrum disorder. From what I've observed, most everyone who works in IT, at least in any technical capacity, resides on the Autism spectrum somewhere. From LFA to HFA to Aspergers to PDD-NOS to OCD to "quirky" to "nerdy"... etc. Pretty much you can substitute "geek" for "autistic" and be on safe ground. Bill Gates is autistic (clearly). Steve Jobs probably too but to a much less noticeable degree.

Comment: Re:Trying to make your mark, eh? (Score 1) 264

by Robert Larson (#30190364) Attached to: Best Practices For Infrastructure Upgrade?
I'd tend to agree here. Buy a couple of blades. Implement vSphere with DRS and HA and possibly FT. Centralize all these core services. HA/FT will provide the fault tolerance at the core. Then spend on buffing redundant network links for remote sites and/or network capacity as needed. Simplify simplify. Minimize the number of VMs providing core services. Put as much as you can into a cloud.

Comment: Article has it wrong (Score 3, Interesting) 712

by proslack (#29283987) Attached to: Has the Rate of Technical Progress Slowed?
Communications ("information") technology has been the biggest change in the last twenty years. Internet, cell phones, gps, wireless...none of this existed (to any significant degree) in the 1980s. Also, this list of patents by calendar year indicates that inventiveness, at least as measured by pursuit of IP protection, has a trend of increasing annually.

Comment: Arse, why kill iPlayer? (Score 1) 163

by hattig (#29282903) Attached to: Nintendo Releases Wii Browser For Free, Updates Flash

the new update disables support for the BBC iPlayer, which "cannot stream video or audio content but it still allows you to browse content.

It is a shame as that is pretty much all I use the Wii internet channel for. My Virgin Media cable box crashes 100% of the time when I try to access iPlayer through its interface. I also don't like watching iPlayer on my computer screen in another room when I want to be on my sofa.

Comment: Re:No Sympathy for Childs... (Score 1) 429

by MartinSchou (#29282005) Attached to: Judge Won't Lower $5M Bail For Jailed SF IT Admin

I'll grant you that they don't deem anyone innocent, but by those standards, we could just dream up charges against anyone we don't like for any kind of paedophilia charges, couldn't we?

Would probably be a better society if everyone had been accused of child molestation. Might make everyone think twice before judging them.

Maternity pay? Now every Tom, Dick and Harry will get pregnant. -- Malcolm Smith

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