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Comment A service to the community: release the text (Score 2, Interesting) 104

I think it would be a great service to the Tor community to release the text of what Boing Boing sent to the FBI as a shining example of how to handle such requests. It may need to be specifically tailored to the sender, but something to go off of might be of benefit to folks running a node who don't have the funds to see legal help outside of /r/legaladvice.

Comment Re:Makes sense (Score 4, Informative) 272

IIRC, there are exceptions in trademark law carved out for peoples' names. That is, someone whose last name is Google could not be prevented from using their name as the name of their company. There are likely some nuances to this, such as that the company couldn't bear the exact same legal name "Google, Inc." or choose the name with intent to cause confusion. Two names that existed in separate industries should be considered safe. This case of naming rights on a privately owned service further complicates the spirit of the law, insomuch as a private entity has control of most of the name and can rightfully choose who uses its service.

ICANN at least honors this sentiment for domains. See the case of Uzi Nissan is Nissan Motors v. Nissan Computer, who registered Nissan.com before Nissan Motors. Similarly in nature, Microsoft v. MikeRoweSoft existed, but was settled out of court.

Personally, I'd like to see Google and other services that offer naming of pages to follow similar guidelines: no one can be prevented from claiming their name.

Comment Imagine Careers/YourTalentAgents (Score 4, Interesting) 145

A little less than three years ago, a friend of mine started YourTalentAgents, a Pittsburgh-based talent agency representing professional IT workers of all sorts (sysadmins, software engineers, hardware folks, etc.). In mid 2014, he merged with another company, Student Intuition, to form Imagine Careers. The talent agency part of the company still exists and has been profitable pretty much since the start. IIRC they've placed something like 85% of the candidates they've worked with, and many of those candidates are referring others to the talent agency. It's flipping the model in favor of excellent technologists looking for a good company, instead of a gaggle of quota-driven headhunters competing to fill a seat with a warm body.

Disclosure: I'm a friend of the CTO of Imagine Careers, who founded YTA, and a currently uncompensated advisor to the company.

Comment Just started using it (Score 1) 129

It's sad, 'cause I just started using it after discovering it late last year. I got my system upgraded to be based off of jessie instead of wheezy and was truckin' along just fine.

I would have loved to see #! continue even as just a metapackage that installs what makes the distro different from vanilla Debian.

Comment A metric for price (Score 2) 290

The be-all-end-all of pricing is mining profitability. Bitcoin's difficulty to meant to adjust according to mining activity. If there isn't enough mining going on to produce the mining rewards that should be awarded daily, the difficulty will quarter every two weeks until the rewards are enough to incentivize miners to continue doing so. So, mining operations might have to stop or turn down the heat in order to stay profitable at the current difficulty, and await the approximately bi-weekly adjustment of difficulty before resuming. However, that next adjustment might not be sufficient to restore profitability, so the stoppage or reduction might have to continue through multiple difficulty adjustments.

If mining farm operators didn't plan for this possibility, then they didn't think through the inevitabilities of Bitcoin enough to maintain their business and they are destined to flood the market with their mining hardware, thereby redistributing the mining hardware and decentralizing mining, as it arguably should be.

Comment Re:yet if we did it (Score 1) 463

I feel the same, and recognize that any person would and should be calling for the officer's head.

However, there was no criminal negligence or intent. That would be necessary to charge. He was operating within the law. Now, we citizens need to push for laws that hold officers to the same distracted driving standards that citizens are bound by, because those laws are based on human nature, not government edict.

Comment I don't care about Java (Score 3, Interesting) 511

Java is moving into archaic irrelevance faster than ever. That is, the language itself.

The JVM, however, is now more useful and relevant than it ever was. It used to be naught but an implementation detail. Now, rather, it's central to an entire ecosystem of languages that will inevitably send Java the way of C: used only when the greatest speed is necessary.

Scala is basically a next-generation Java. Java with functional programming, or really, vice versa. JRuby make Ruby actually scalable, given the presence of native threads and interoperability with existing enterprise libraries that commonly only ship in the form of Java or C# libraries. Clojure enables LISPers of yore and Schemers of new import explore functional programming as it used to be, without having to drop the wealth of Java libraries available. Ceylon, Groovy, Jython, and dozen of others are paving a way to give the JVM much more to do after Java becomes obsolete.

Java will never die - it'll just become like COBOL, Fortran, and C before it: used in enterprise software, operating systems, and outdated educational assessments.

Comment CLA (Score 3, Insightful) 57

Having a solid Contributor License Agreement process in place would probably be a good idea. That way, it's clear who owns the code that comes in and encourages people to contribute while defining a (necessary evil) process for doing so. You'll lose random passers-by, but just one passer-by who gets litigious could be more of a headache than it's worth.

The rule on staying alive as a program manager is to give 'em a number or give 'em a date, but never give 'em both at once.

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