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Submission + - "Universal Jigsaw Puzzle" Hits Stores in Japan (

Riktov writes: I came across this at Tokyo toy store last week, and it's one of the coolest things I've seen in a long time. Jigazo Puzzle is a jigsaw puzzle, but you can make anything with it. It has just 300 pieces which are all just varying shades of a single color, though a few have gradations across the piece; i.e., each piece is a generic pixel. Out of the box, you can make Mona Lisa, JFK, etc, arranging it according to symbols printed on the reverse side. But here's the amazing thing: take a photo (for example, of yourself) with a cell-phone, e-mail it to the company, and they will send you back a pattern that will recreate that photo. This article is in Japanese, but as they say, a few pictures are worth a million words. And 300 pixels are worth an infinite number of pictures.
The Media

Submission + - Kleenex, Xerox, Linux, and other generic words (

Riktov writes: Thomas Friedman's latest column in the New York Times is about global warming and new innovative technological solutions. It has nothing to do with IT and computers. Yet there in the middle of a description of an MIT collaborative project towards an energy-efficient vehicle, Friedman describes it as "the Linux of cars." Not a word of explanation, qualification, or elaboration of just what Linux is or how the MIT project is analogous to some computer OS. Not even a hyperlink. It's Linux, and you, dear reader, surely know what that means, don't you?

When the term "Linux" can be used in any context in the general media with the assumption that anyone reading it knows what it means, surely it's as mainstream as it could possibly be.


Submission + - Save the planet: Wear recyclable polyester

Riktov writes: "The New York Times has a short piece on how clothing sellers and manufacturers are looking at the ecology of clothing and possible future trends in the area.

Current consumer habits, driven by "fast fashion", where people buy and go through clothing at a rapid rate, and then end up throwing it all away, may have to give way to green fashion, where clothing is more durable, requires less energy to clean and maintain, and ends up being re-used or recycled (or even rented in the first place). Did you know that your "all-natural" cotton T-shirt uses more energy over its lifetime than the polyester equivalent?

Of course, when it comes to not following fickle fashion trends and cutting back on washing clothing, perhaps the Slashdot crowd is way ahead of the game..."

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