Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:because desktop linux is a toy and novelty (Score 1) 1215

by Rigrig (#43952933) Attached to: What Keeps You On (or Off) Windows in 2013?

It always makes me wonder if I'm the only one that has zero problems with sound? Or pretty much anything? Am I just that lucky and skillful and freaking awesome in selecting hardware?

Well, last time I had to reinstall my work PC it took at least half a day, what with hunting down the driver CDs (without which even the ethernet port didn't work, so no downloading them), and figuring out which license keys to use, and where to download every individual software package.

Oh wait, got it a bit mixed up. Nops, Linux also works fine for me, last reinstall took at most half an hour to get the system running, which happily included office, and about another half hour to remember which other packages to apt-get.

For me Linux on the desktop happened several years ago, I'm not even bothering to install dual-boot anymore.

Comment: Re:Is it fixed? (Score 2) 247

2) Create a new subscription account.
3) Realize that you are on the internet, where not everybody plays by your rules. Install spam and virus filters, and get on with your life. You've done all that you can to help the clueless operators. Its not worth any more of your time or anguish.

Possibly skip 2) though, as "clueless operators" might not be the best choice to obtain your "tools for the Systems Administration community" from?

Comment: Re:This is weird (Score 1) 295

by Rigrig (#41959303) Attached to: The Release Candidate For Linux Mint 14 "Nadia" Is Out
I switched from Ubuntu to Mint a while ago (before Unity), because it promised to be "Ubuntu, only easier", and stuck around because it was. I'm not saying that I don't enjoy tinkering with stuff (messing around until it breaks is the usual the reason for me having to re-install), but it's nice to have everything working right away on a fresh install, instead of having to go through the motions of setting up restricted-extras yet again.

Comment: Re:On no. 1 & 3: Never trust the client (Score 1) 265

by Rigrig (#37106332) Attached to: Hard Truths About HTML5

Don't trust the client, store things like geolocation data and other such things server-side.

Uhm, where do you think you got those coordinates from in the first place?
TFA isn't talking about sending geoip data back to browsers to store it in a cookie, it's about getting GPS data from visitors, who will want to lie about it, e.g. to get free beers for logging in at a specific spot several days in a row.

Comment: Re:Every "investment" in EVE is a scam. (Score 4, Interesting) 171

by Rigrig (#37099738) Attached to: <em>EVE Online</em> Ponzi Scheme Nets $50k Worth of In-Game Currency
FTFA:

Along the way, 345.18 billion ISK was paid out to investors as interest to make sure the scheme kept going. Another 452.72 billion was withdrawn by worried investors before the company shut down; that left 1,034 billion ISK in the hands of the company's owners.

I always wonder how many of these worried investors recognized the scheme for what it was right away, and decided to try and make some profit out of it themselves.

Comment: Re:Problem will solve itself (Score 1) 535

by Rigrig (#36352926) Attached to: Bitcoin Used For the Narcotics Trade
Most people would just not buy from that person again. With the profit margins on drugs being as huge as they are, dealers make more money from only two sales than from ripping you off once.
Also, if your business model consists of consistently ripping off people willing to buy illegal drugs, my guess is it probably won't be too long before you piss off the kind of people that do believe in physical customer feedback. (Although obviously they won't be able to find you, as all the wire tapping is exclusively accessible to incorruptible people that only have your safety against terrorism, child porn, and crimethink on their mind.)

Comment: Re:Tools for OS X and Linux (Score 1) 248

by Rigrig (#36291062) Attached to: What's Killing Your Wi-Fi?
There's inSSIDer for Linux, although Kismet is nice, it doesn't output pretty pictures :p (Seriously though, the graphical overview of networks is a nice addition to just a textual list of networks and their strengths for each channel, especially for seeing the overlap if they're using something besides the three standard channels)

Comment: Re:unrealistic armchair approach (Score 1) 254

by Rigrig (#36248172) Attached to: Experts Say Gestural Interfaces Are a Step Backwards In Usability

Companies spending too much time perfecting their UI design will go out of business while their competitors are shipping flawed but ultimately usable products.

There's a difference between perfecting a UI design and inflicting completely new, experimental ideas on unsuspecting users. Testing which particular gesture would be best for each interaction might take too much time, but completely omitting menus (leaving the only way to accomplish anything to be guessing the right gesture) is something that should've been thought over (especially if your target platform ships with a physical 'menu' button).

Comment: Re:Why would you think the numbers would match up? (Score 1) 319

by Rigrig (#36002562) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Monitor Your Own Bandwidth Usage?

In any event, the only number that means anything in your relationship with your ISP is their number. You will not be able to convince them that your number is "right" or "more correct" than their number.

You might not be able to convince them, but you are able to switch ISP.

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (1) Gee, I wish we hadn't backed down on 'noalias'.

Working...