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Comment: Re:Prediction: (Score 3, Insightful) 68

by daveschroeder (#48680051) Attached to: N. Korea Blames US For Internet Outage, Compares Obama to "a Monkey"

First of all, you say, "North Korea didn't hack Sony," as if it is an indisputable, known fact. It is not -- by any stretch of the imagination.

The fact is, it cannot be proven either way in a public forum, or without having independent access to evidence which proves -- from a social, not technical, standpoint -- how the attack originated. Since neither of those are possible, the MOST that can be accurate stated is that no one, in a public context, can definitively demonstrate for certain who hacked Sony.

Blameless in your scenario is the only entity actually responsible, which is that entity that attacked Sony in the first place.

Whether that is the DPRK, someone directed by the DPRK, someone else entirely, or a combination of the above, your larger point appears to be that somehow the US is to blame for a US subsidiary of a Japanese corporation getting hacked -- or perhaps simply for existing.

As a bonus, you could blame Sony for saying its security controls weren't strong enough, while still reserving enough blame for the US as the only "jackass".

Bravo.

Comment: Prediction: (Score 5, Insightful) 68

by daveschroeder (#48679895) Attached to: N. Korea Blames US For Internet Outage, Compares Obama to "a Monkey"

Many of the same slashdotters who accept "experts" who claim NK didn't hack Sony will readily accept as truth that it was "obviously" the US that attacked NK, even though there is even less objective proof of that, and could just as easily be some Anonymous offshoot, or any number of other organizations, or even North Korea itself.

See the logical disconnect, here?

For those now jumping on the "North Korea didn't hack Sony" bandwagon that some security "experts" are leading for their own political or ideological reasons, including using rationales as puzzling and pedestrian as source IP addresses of the attacks being elsewhere, some comments:

Attribution in cyber is hard, and the general public is never going to know the classified intelligence that went into making an attribution determination, and experts -- actual and self-appointed -- will make claims about what they think occurred.

With cyber, you could have nation-states, terrorists organizations, or even activist hacking groups attacking other nation-states, companies, or organizations, for any number of motives, and making it appear, from a social and technical standpoint, that the attack originated from and/or was ordered by another entity entirely.

That's a HUGE problem, but there are ways to mitigate it. A Sony "insider" may indeed -- wittingly or unwittingly -- have been key in pulling off this hack. That doesn't mean that DPRK wasn't involved. I am not making a formal statement one way or the other; just saying that the public won't be privy to the specific attribution rationale.

Also, any offensive cyber action that isn't totally worthless is going to attempt to mask or completely divert attention from its true origins (unless part of the strategic intent is to make it clear who did it), or at a minimum maintain some semblance of deniability.

At some point you have to apply Occam's razor and ask who benefits.

And for those riding the kooky "This is all a big marketing scam by Sony" train:

So, you're saying that Sony leaked thousands of extremely embarrassing and in some cases damaging internal documents and emails that will probably result in the CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment being ousted, including private and statutorily-protected personal health information of employees, and issued terroristic messages threatening 9/11-style attacks at US movie theaters, committing dozens to hundreds of federal felonies, while derailing any hopes for a mass release and instead having it end up on YouTube for rental, all to promote one of hundreds of second-rate movies?

Yeah...no.

Comment: Dont add time, use it better. (Score 2) 90

by Richard_at_work (#48679369) Attached to: Boston Elementary, Middle Schools To Get a Longer Day

Meh, quality is what it is about, not quantity - the school I went to had a 9am to 4pm school day and was doing well in rankings, but they decided to do a fairly major restructuring of the school day in order to shift more lessons before lunch (they had a research project for a year prior, which showed the two lessons after lunch had a much lower engagement level than lessons before lunch). By starting 20 minutes earlier (8.40 start) and cutting 20 minutes off of the hour lunch, they managed to have four lessons before lunch, one after, and actually managed to shave an hour off the school day, meaning we got to finish at 3pm. Even the kids loved it, and the study done after showed a massive uptick in engagement in both the single lesson after lunch, and the one that had been moved to before lunch. The school is now topping rankings in the area as well.

Comment: Re:Skeptical about Democracies (Score 1) 208

by drinkypoo (#48679283) Attached to: The World Is Not Falling Apart

Because in other places 'democracy' is not just a slogan,

[citation needed]

usually because it was not something took for granted.

Every day you're not doing something to improve your lot, you're taking it for granted. Most of us are guilty. But this is all irrelevant, because this is based on the opinions of the people writing the report, and not of the citizenry of the various countries.

Comment: It should start later, esp. for high schoolers (Score 4, Insightful) 90

by drinkypoo (#48679279) Attached to: Boston Elementary, Middle Schools To Get a Longer Day

No need for school to start at the absolute butt-crack of dawn. It's actually been shown to be harmful for teenagers. Their natural sleep cycle involves sleeping in. Many of them simply physically cannot function so early in the morning. (Thinking is a physical process...)

If high school started an hour later, the kids would be on the streets less while parents are off work, too. So it seems like a win-win, without actually increasing the number of hours of instruction.

Increasing the duration of school won't automatically improve education. "No Child Left Behind" certainly didn't, but it did require greater duration to the school day if you actually met all of its requirements.

Comment: Re:Call me when.. (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679269) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

What about a motorcycle's range? Are these vehicles not ready for prime time?

Of course not. Motorcycles only fit the needs of a minuscule segment of the population, they are not and never have been a "prime time" [equivalent] type of vehicle. They also get poor mileage (for their mass, especially, but many of them actually get poor mileage on the small car scale now, since small cars have come so far) and they have high pollution except in the few places where catalysts are mandatory. Even then, you can expect more pollution per gallon burned.

Comment: Re:Coincidentally... (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679263) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

They also have new tires, which improve the rolling resistance coefficient by about 20%.

Do they mention that the minimum stopping distance has now increased by 20%?

Every year, tires get better. They can probably get the same level of traction with today's LRR tire as what they had before. We bought this year's best All-Terrain (Cooper AT3) which has finally solved their wet traction and tire wear problems, but it still has awful tire noise in turns, makes you think a wheel bearing's going. In a couple more years I expect them to have solved that particular problem. LRR tires have come a long way too, and there's a whole new generation of them now to fit into the space they used to occupy, for the cars least expected to handle well.

Comment: Re:Coincidentally... (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679257) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

"assuming you don't have antilock brakes" is irrelevant to any vaguely modern car, because the EU made ABS mandatory years ago

So did the USA. And the USA has also made yaw control and traction control mandatory since 2010. As usual, the USA has more strict requirements for new cars than anyone else in the world, both in safety and finally now in emissions and mileage. (The USA has the strictest emissions laws sometimes, but not all the time...)

Comment: Re:There is a set of speeds and driving conditions (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679253) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

Worse in the winter cause you're blasting heat? Why not just put a coat on?

People don't buy an $80k car so that they can wear a heavy coat instead of turning on the heater. People who can afford them just move closer to where they want to go in order to defeat range anxiety. #poorpeopleproblems

Comment: Re:Now we're getting somewhere (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679249) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

In fact, strike that, this is simpler. Have your solar cells pump water to the cistern for all the hours the sun is in the sky. Have a separate pipe in which the water flows down hill to spin the turbine, which is your power source. The cistern acts as a ballast, storing energy during peak production times to be used during times of low or no production.

The electric motor which pumps the water might be 95% efficient, but you have to use it to fight gravity. Or you could just not have any conversion loss at all, and not fight gravity, when you're actually using the power. And that's why this is a dumb idea.

Comment: Re:careful about the tires - less safe (Score 1) 108

by drinkypoo (#48679241) Attached to: Tesla Roadster Update Extends Range

Owners might want to take a close look at the NHTSA testing of the tires. Generally speaking, lower rolling resistance means less traction, which means less safe when cornering, maneuvering around an accident or animal ahead, or braking.

Sure, although they could have updated the traction/yaw control software to account for the reduced traction as well, and may have done.

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