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Submission + - Donald Trump Calls for Higher H1-B Wages, More Domestic Hiring

An anonymous reader writes: In a recently released immigration reform plan, Donald Trump details a number of items that would change the landscape of technology workers in the United States, including raising the wage floor for workers coming in under the H1-B, and making additional requirements to hire citizens first if available. The plan cites statistics demonstrating a large pool of available, long-term unemployed Americans, and STEM graduates unable to find appropriate work. It claims the changes would spur hiring of domestic unemployed and underemployed persons.

Submission + - Donald Trump emerges as fierce H-1B critic (

dcblogs writes: Donald Trump's plan for the H-1B visa is to make it harder and more expensive for tech companies to replace U.S. workers with foreign help. Trump's immigration plan, released Sunday, includes the ideas of the Senate's strongest H-1B critics, including Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala), who immediately endorsed it. "This is exactly the plan America needs," he said. Trump is proposing an increase in the prevailing wage to make it more expensive to use H-1B workers. Many visa holders are paid the lowest prevailing wage level set for entry-level positions. Second, Trump wants a requirement that companies hire U.S. workers first. Critics says without this requirement, visa workers can be used to replace U.S. workers. He also used to policy paper to call Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), "Mark Zuckerberg's personal senator," because of Rubio's support of the I-Squared bill. That bill seeks to raise the base H-1B cap from 65,000 to 195,000.

Submission + - Perl Isn't Going Anywhere -- For Better Or Worse (

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia waxes philosophical about Perl stagnancy in IT. 'A massive number of tools and projects still make the most out of the language. But it's hard to see Perl regaining its former glory without a dramatic turnaround in the near term. As more time goes by, Perl will likely continue to decline in popularity and cement its growing status as a somewhat arcane and archaic language, especially as compared to newer, more lithe options. Perhaps that's OK. Perl has been an instrumental part of the innovation and technological advancements of the last two decades, and it's served as a catalyst for a significant number of other languages that have contributed heavily to the programming world in general.'"

Submission + - The next-gen console tech hiding in plain sight (

An anonymous reader writes: Sony and Microsoft's next-gen consoles are coming: too many "next generation" games announced, too many details have leaked to suggest otherwise. But while Microsoft and Sony officially keep schtum on the existence of the Xbox 720 and PS4, both companies have laid out some of the next-gen features you can expect from both already. Microsoft's recent IllumiRoom demo showed CES visitors how an Xbox might use a whole room as a screen to play on, while Sony's purchase of game streaming service Gaikai points to a future where every Sony device might be a PlayStation, not just the PS4. It's an interesting rundown that leaves you wondering just what secrets both gaming giants might still have in store for us.
Open Source

Submission + - Why a Linux user is using Windows 3.1 ( 1

colinneagle writes: About two weeks back, I was using my Android tablet and looking for a good graphics editor. I wanted something with layers and good text drawing tools. That’s when it hit me. We already have that.

Photoshop used to run on Windows 3.1. And Windows 3.1 runs great under both DOSBox and QEMU, both of which are Open Source emulators available for Android and every other platform under the sun.

So I promptly set to work digging up an old copy of Photoshop. The last version released for Windows 3.1 was back in 1996. And finding a working copy proved to be...challenging. Luckily, the good folks at Adobe dug around in their vaults and managed to get me up and running.

And, after a bit of tweaking, I ended up with an astoundingly functional copy of Photoshop that I can now run on absolutely every device I own. And the entire environment (fonts, working files and all) are automatically backed up to the cloud and synced between systems.

But what other applications (and, potentially, games) does this give me access to? How far can I take this?


Submission + - The End of Cheap Labor in China ( 3

hackingbear writes: The Time magazine reports, in what is supposed to be a land of unlimited cheap labor — a nation of 1.3 billion people, whose extraordinary 20-year economic rise has been built first and foremost on the backs of low-priced workers — the game has changed. In the past decade, real wages for manufacturing workers in China have grown nearly 12% per year. The hourly cost advantage, while still significant [comparing to the West], is shrinking rapidly. The changing economics of Made in China will benefit both the rich and poor world. Countries like Cambodia, Laos, India and Vietnam are picking up some of the cheapest labor manufacturing left by the Chinese. And there is already evidence of at least the beginning of a shift in manufacturing operations returning to the U.S. Perhaps we will soon stop picking at "Made in China" but instead complaining "Made in Vietnam/Cambodia", while serving the flood of Chinese tourists stocking up brand-name merchandises on US tours and Chinese students paying high tuitions to our cash-strapped universities.

Submission + - PlayStation Network Crisis May Cost Sony Billions (

donniebaseball23 writes: It's been revealed that Sony's PlayStation Network could be offline until May 31 and the financial impact on the company could be sizable. One Japanese analyst from Barclays Capital put the damage at more than $2.7 billion. Not only that, but the PSN downtime is hurting developers and publishers who rely on digital sales for some titles. Capcom VP Christian Svensson commented that the outage is costing Capcom "hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars."

Submission + - PSN won't be restored this week ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Bad news continue to come for the Playstation users. Sony has announced via its official PlayStation blog that the PlayStation Network services which went down in late April , won’t be restored this week as promised earlier. Based on the statement given by Patrick Seybold, the head PR representative of Sony Playstation, the gaming giants require time to do more testing as they seek to come to terms with the extent of the attack: We were unaware of the extent of the attack on Sony Online Entertainment servers, and we are taking this opportunity to conduct further testing of the incredibly complex system.

Submission + - Music while programming 6

BubbaDoom writes: In our cublicle-ville, we have programmers intermixed with accounting, customer support and marketing. As a programmer, it is our habit to put on our headphones and listen to our portable music players to drown out all of the noise from everyone else. The boss recently sent an email just to the programmers demanding that we do not use our music players at work because he thinks it distracts us from our jobs and causes us to make mistakes. Of course we've explained to him that the prattle from the other people is much much more distracting but he insists his policy is the right one. What is the /. community's experience with music at work for programmers?
The Almighty Buck

America's Army Games Cost $33 Million Over 10 Years 192

Responding to a Freedom Of Information Act request, the US government has revealed the operating costs of the America's Army game series over the past decade. The total bill comes to $32.8 million, with yearly costs varying from $1.3 million to $5.6 million. "While operating America's Army 3 does involve ongoing expenses, paying the game's original development team isn't one of them. Days after the game launched in June, representatives with the Army confirmed that ties were severed with the Emeryville, California-based team behind the project, and future development efforts were being consolidated at the America's Army program office at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama. A decade after its initial foray into the world of gaming, the Army doesn't appear to be withdrawing from the industry anytime soon. In denying other aspects of the FOIA request, the Army stated 'disclosure of this information is likely to cause substantial harm to the Department of the Army's competitive position in the gaming industry.'"

Submission + - Scientists Say Boys are Turning into Girls 1

Pickens writes: "The Guardian reports that Denmark has unveiled official research showing that two-year-old children are at risk from a bewildering array of gender-bending chemicals in such everyday items as waterproof clothes, rubber boots, bed linen, food, sunscreen lotion and moisturizing cream with a picture emerging of ubiquitous chemical contamination driving down sperm counts and feminizing male children all over the developed world. Research at Rotterdam's Erasmus University found that boys whose mothers were exposed to PCBs and dioxins were more likely to play with dolls and tea sets and dress up in female clothes. "The amounts that two-year-olds absorb from the [preservative] parabens propylparaben and butylparaben can constitute a risk for oestrogen-like disruptions of the endocrine system," says the report. "This contribution originates predominantly from cosmetic products such as oil-based creams, moisturising creams, lotions and sunscreen." The contamination may also offer a clue to a mysterious shift in the sex of babies. Normally 106 boys are born for every 100 girls: it is thought to be nature's way of making up for the fact that men were more likely to be killed hunting or in conflict. But the proportion of females is rising, so much so that some 250,000 babies who statistically should have been boys have ended up as girls in Japan and the United States alone. "Both the public and wildlife are inadequately protected from harm, as regulation is based on looking at exposure to each substance in isolation, and yet it is now proven beyond doubt that hormone disrupting chemicals can act together to cause effects even when each by itself would not," says Gwynne Lyons, director of Chem Trust."

Submission + - The end of US Internet freedom?

clang_jangle writes: That's the claim made by the Inquirer in an article reporting some ominous observations about the FCC's impending rules regarding net neutrality.

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided that it will police the Internet to make sure that the large ISPs — telecom and cable companies, mostly — do not force a two-tiered Internet on the American public.
However a group of prominent law professors has warned the FCC that buried in the fine print of its proposed Net Neutrality rules are potential loopholes that if left open could be exploited by the ISPs in connivance with the entertainment cartels to undermine the future of Internet freedom.
Columbia University Law School professor and Free Press board chair Tim Wu told the Washington Post about the letter after submitting it to the FCC.

The letter the profs submitted is available here (PDF warning).

Nothing is finished until the paperwork is done.