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Wireless Networking

+ - iOS 6 device users report baffling range of Wi-Fi problems -> 1

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Some number of iPhone and iPad users upgrading to iOS 6 are reporting a range of Wi-Fi problems, as are some iPhone 5 users. The solutions, when there are any, seems as baffling as the problems. The continuing posts at Apple's tech support site and at online forums show users with existing iPhone and iPads frustrated by a flurry of different problems, including a "grayed out" Wi-Fi option, dropped connections, slow connection speeds, and having to connect manually to a Wi-Fi access point. Separately, there are posts by some owners of the new iPhone 5, released last Friday, also about Wi-Fi problems. Confusedly, these are problems that are unrelated to the Wi-Fi glitch last week when iOS 6 was first released."
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Science

The Strange Case of Solar Flares and Radioactive Decay Rates 408

Posted by Soulskill
from the cool-science dept.
DarkKnightRadick writes "Current models for radioactive decay have been challenged by, of all sources, the sun. According to the article, 'On Dec 13, 2006, the sun itself provided a crucial clue, when a solar flare sent a stream of particles and radiation toward Earth. Purdue nuclear engineer Jere Jenkins, while measuring the decay rate of manganese-54, a short-lived isotope used in medical diagnostics, noticed that the rate dropped slightly during the flare, a decrease that started about a day and a half before the flare.' This is important because the rate of decay is very important not just for antique dating, but also for cancer treatment, time keeping, and the generation of random numbers. This isn't a one time measurement, either. 'Checking data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island and the Federal Physical and Technical Institute in Germany, they came across something even more surprising: long-term observation of the decay rate of silicon-32 and radium-226 seemed to show a small seasonal variation. The decay rate was ever so slightly faster in winter than in summer.'"

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