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Submission + - MouseTrace - Taking the guesswork out of improving ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: A new Internet start-up is looking to revolutionize the way bloggers and website owners optimize and enhance their sites to better suit their customers and visitors.

By adding 1 line of HTML to a website, designers and website owners will be able to watch replays showing exactly how visitors use their websites – with every mouse movement, click and page scroll being displayed in real-time. It’s like sitting next to the visitor, watching their screen!

The new technology doesn’t require any software to be installed and records visitors from desktops, laptops and even the Apple iPhone.

MouseTrace offers a simple solution which allows any website owner or designer to monitor how their visitors really use their website or blog, no more guessing why people aren’t engaging more, buying or signing up for your newsletters. Drop 1 line of HTML code into your website and then sit back and watch your visitors as they navigate through your website.

By watching how the visitors actually use a website or blog, owners are able to rapidly find faults and identify where improvements can be made to drastically increase sales, better target advertising and improve reader engagement.

One of the unique features of MouseTrace is that it also keeps a record of what the webpage looked like at the time of the visit, so if it is being used on a blog you can watch how user engagement changes as the blog is updated – or in the case of an e-commerce site, try out different layouts or display options. By storing the raw page content at the time of the visit, MouseTrace is also able to display an accurate representation of the page as the visitor saw it –including how it fits within the visitors’ browser window.

MouseTrace is also the first to record user activity from iPhone users as well, showing the website owner how their website looks on the device and how the visitors are navigating through the website including zooming in and out of pages, rotating the view and using multi-touch gestures.

The MouseTrace service is being launched in the US and the Europe today, with further enhancements already in development.

Submission + - Windows Update driver update breaks systems

An anonymous reader writes: Multiple forums around the Web are seeing frustrated users with all of their data gone just after updating to the latest Promise Technologies RAID driver available as an optional update in Windows Update. After installing these drivers, users report having lost access to all of their data. A simple query on Google will show that the problem is widely spread and until this date not addressed by Microsoft:

Submission + - Thailand blocks WikiLeaks (

societyofrobots writes: Thailand, already known for blocking tens of thousands of websites for 'offending the monarchy', has now 'blocked domestic access to the WikiLeaks whistleblower website on security grounds'.

Submission + - UK Xbox FFXIII Ad Banned For Using PS3 Footage (

siliconbits writes: UK Ad watchdog, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), also says that Sony's PlayStation 3 (PS3) games console delivers sharper images than Microsoft's Xbox 360. The ASA came to this decision after it was notified that PS3 footage was used in an advert for the Xbox 360 version of Final Fantasy XIII.

Feds Won't File Charges In School Laptop-Spy Case 398

jamie writes "Federal prosecutors have decided not to file charges against a Philadelphia school district or its employees over the use of software to remotely monitor students. From the article: 'US Attorney Zane David Memeger says investigators have found no evidence of criminal intent by Lower Merion School District employees who activated tracking software that took thousands of webcam and screenshot images on school-provided laptops.'"

Computers can figure out all kinds of problems, except the things in the world that just don't add up.