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Submission + - AlienBEware: Why You SHOULD build Your Own PC ( 2

An anonymous reader writes: If you're thinking of paying for a company to build you your dream gaming PC, this article might open your eyes as to how much you are being ripped off.

"I am aghast to the nth degree at the exorbitant pricing of Alienware's flagship gaming PC with the build I specified. It boggles the mind thinking how this could actually be justified. I sincerely hope this is an eye-opener for anyone thinking of going for a pre-built gaming PC. Building one yourself is a piece of cake, and you'll save a whole lot of cash in the process and likely end up with something more powerful and ultimately more personal than a mass-production assembly line could ever conjure up."

Open Source

Submission + - 2010's Best Open Source Software (

snydeq writes: "The InfoWorld Test Center rounds up of the past year in open source, highlighting the best open source offerings in several software categories: 'The word "best" here can mean many things. It is sometimes equivalent to "most promising," "most surprising", "most subversive," "most unnerving," "most opportune," "most happening," or some weird, inchoate mixture of them all. The one thing it always means is "most useful" — to developers, IT administrators, and users on a business network.' From enterprise apps, to app dev tools, to platforms and middleware, to networking software, the list is expansive, including 39 hybrid license and community offerings."
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - Stardock rescinds "Gamers Bill of Rights" (

binarylarry writes: Stardock’s own Gamer’s Bill of Rights is no longer to be found on their site. That’d be the Bill of Rights featuring the proud bulletpoint:

“2. Gamers shall have the right to demand that games be released in a finished state.”

You used to be able to find the bill right here.

PC Gamer are up in arms about it being unfinished in a similar manner to earlier Stardock release, DemiGod, which also came out earlier than its announced release date. PCG go on to quote a post from Stardock CEO Brad Wardell on the Quarter to Three forums in which he responds to a displeased customer, seemingly in absolute contradiction of his own Rule #2:

“the hostility in this thread exceeds my own tolerance for putting up with said hostility.

Also, to anyone, like you Ben, saying the game is like an “early beta” then well, please stay away from our games in the future. I consider it ready for release and if others disagree, don’t buy our games.”

We’ve contacted Stardock for a comment and are awaiting a response.


Submission + - 1978 Cryptosystem Resists Quantum Attack ( 1

KentuckyFC writes: In 1978, the CalTech mathematician Robert McEliece developed a cryptosystem based on the (then) new idea of using asymmetric mathematical functions to create different keys for encrypting and decrypting information. The security of these systems relies on mathematical steps that are easy to make in one direction but hard to do in the other. The most famous example is multiplication. It is easy to multiply two numbers together to get a third but hard to start with the third number and work out which two generated it, a process called factorisation. Today, popular encryption systems such as the RSA algorithm use exactly this idea. But in 1994, the mathematician Peter Shor dreamt up a quantum algorithm that could factorise much faster than any classical counterpart and so can break these codes. As soon as the first decent-sized quantum computer is switched on, these codes will become breakable. Since then, cryptographers have been hunting for encryption systems that will be safe in the post quantum world. Now a group of mathematicians have shown that the McEliece encryption system is safe against attack by Shor's algorithm and all other known quantum algorithms. That's because it does not depend on factorisation but gets its security from another asymmetric conundrum known as the hidden subgroup problem which they show is immune to all known quantum attacks (although the work says nothing about its safety against new quantum (or classical) attacks).

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.