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Comment: Re:Wonder how Ada 2012 would fare... (Score 1) 189

by Renegade88 (#46766025) Attached to: The Security of Popular Programming Languages
You've stumped me on AS/400 -- I'm having a hard time find viable Ada options for even modern IBM mainframes. (iSeries)

To be fair, the context was openssl. Is that going to be realistically run on 8-bit bare metal?

It's generally not too hard get GNAT running on any platform that gcc runs on, but 8-bit would be pretty challenging I think.

Comment: Re:Wonder how Ada 2012 would fare... (Score 1) 189

by Renegade88 (#46765311) Attached to: The Security of Popular Programming Languages
Actually, you do not have to pay for for an Ada android cross-compiler and one has been available for 3 years already. Here is the latest gcc 4.9-based free (in every sense) android/arm cross compiler with FreeBSD as host (DragonFly BSD is also an option)

http://www.freshports.org/lang...

And here are the testsuite results: http://www.dragonlace.net/gnat...

The only test it fails are the stack-check tests, and that is because gcc doesn't support it yet (a patch was produced but it's not be accepted yet).

Comment: Re:LGPL with affero clause (Score 1) 210

by Renegade88 (#36261202) Attached to: FSF On How To Choose a License

After all the clauses in the bsd license still limit your 'freedom' in this sense.

"This sense" refers to "People could make changes to our library, use them in their commercial service and not make changes public.". BSD does not restrict freedom in this sense. The only restrictions are those 2,3 or 4 clauses listed on the license. The GPL tells you want you can do, the BSD tells you want you can't do (which isn't much).

You can try to redefine free all you want. If one party loses rights at the expense of the other, calling it "free" is disingenuous at best.

Comment: Re:What functionality are we BSD users ... (Score 2) 193

by Renegade88 (#34903472) Attached to: Xfce 4.8 Released
Great thesis except it doesn't apply to either Linus or Theo. Theo spent months trying to regain his commit status. He wasn't looking to fork. The NetBSD core guys basically locked him out and gave him no reason to believe anything would ever change. The sad thing was (besides the fact Theo co-founded the project) was that the code NetBSD locked out was really useful to them. A real interesting story, but it was not an "F*** you" situation.

Linus claimed he wasn't aware of the existing BSD projects, so he wasn't trying to "do his own thing" either.

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