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Comment: Re:China wants in on this deal too (Score 1) 179

by Registered Coward v2 (#48474841) Attached to: Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

And the US wants everyone to keep all the information and let the NSA have access to it no matter where it resides.

That's at least not hypocritical until they are acting surprised that China wants to do the same.

Oh wait... they did that when they declared that "cyper attacks" are considered as hostile as regular military attacks. Wow, I'm glad that no one actually measures them by what they say....

Remember: When we do it it's good and when *they* do it it's bad. Been that way since the first man noticed another living in the cave next door.

Comment: Re:China wants in on this deal too (Score 1) 179

by Registered Coward v2 (#48474031) Attached to: Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

If Europe can regulate what the whole world sees on Google, why not China?

If they do go through with it, let's at least have a www.google.us without the censorship. (Probably a good idea anyway.)

And the US wants everyone to keep all the information and let the NSA have access to it no matter where it resides.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 1) 437

by Registered Coward v2 (#48458051) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

Well to be honest I understand PART of why they would be outrage over it. If I pay 5k for you to come and work and you are here for 1 day I am out 5k. Now I agree with your overall primise, as long as the employer they went to had to pay a share of that money back, prorated.

That's the whole point. If I truly pay you a market wage you have little incentive to leave; however if I pay below market wage all I become is a labor pool for other companies. As a result, I would first try to fill jobs with local labor and if there is a shortage than use a visa program to fill them. Since there is a lower supply than demand i will pay a premium for that labor if I really need it; a true free market solution.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 1) 437

by Registered Coward v2 (#48457617) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

So by open market you mean protected local labor market?

Reread the previous post. Nothing about reducing H1-Bs. Maybe that's the end game for the previous poster, but greatly reducing the indentured servitude aspect of an H1-B visa (especially while saying nothing about reducing the number of H1-Bs!) doesn't restrict the labor pool.

As the OP, i can say I my end game is not to reduce the number of H1B's available but to ensure H1B's actually get a competitive salary with other workers by eliminating restrictions on their job mobility. If employers had to pay the cost of an H1B plus a competitive wage, which they claim to do today, it would be more economically viable to hire someone with the requisite skills that doesn't need to be sponsored since you would avoid all the extra costs; and do not run the risk of, after paying those costs, of losing the employee and having to pay for replacement. Right now, the indentured nature of the H1B means wages are lower because employees have no bargaining power; something that is easy to fix but requires more political will than exists in Washington.

As for a truly open market where anyone can move anywhere; yes that is a nice Utopian dream but like unicorns does not exist. So, we have to deal with the labor market as it is, not what we might like it to be and fix the real world problems that are fixable.

Comment: Duh (Score 3, Interesting) 437

by Registered Coward v2 (#48457021) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
All of the tech industries behavior point to a desire to keep wages lower than what they would pay in an open market. Whether it's expanding H1B's or agreeing not to poach the goal is the same not driving up the cost of talent. Thus we have a "shortage" of tech workers so we must import more rathe than we have an abundant supply at higher wages so lets hire them. I am not surprise at the GAO report. What needs to be done is make H1B visas portable so after say 6 month to a year the holder was free to switch jobs. That would end abuses quickly and all of a sudden the "shortage" would disappear when it becomes more costly to get and keep an H1B then hire a local.

Comment: Re:Does rights-corp have anything to take? (Score 1) 67

These places tend to be asset-less companies that do not care about being sued, they simply form another shell and fold.

Per TFA, the lawsuit also has 10 John Doe defendants and they intend to go after the copyright holders Rightscorp represents. Given their deep pockets, if the lawsuit successfully includes them then who has what assets is moot since they all are on hook for the judgement so if one can't pay the other must.

Comment: Re:Wait what? (Score 1) 171

Remember how they busted Al Capone? Tax evasion? They knew for a fact how he got his money, but they also knew that to prove he was innocent he'd have to admit to how he got his money. So, despite violating his rights, the spirit of the law, and perverting the justice system. they got him anyway. Win at all costs...

Actually they used the tax code properly. He failed to report income and was tried and convicted. He could have reported it and paid taxes on it and avoided prosecution.

Comment: Re:You know what's really sad? (Score 1) 129

by Registered Coward v2 (#48425133) Attached to: Court Shuts Down Alleged $120M Tech Support Scam

Greed.

There is/was a popular scam that involved getting people to look at their Windows error log in order to convince them that they needed "help." It was quite effective because the average user easily accepts that errors are the same as problems.

Fortunately, many of the scammers aren't to bright either and are easily played if they think you're a mark. I get those calls every now and then and drew with them until they are clearly really pissed. Then I tell them I'm bored and thank them for the free entertainment. That causes them to blow a gasket and I start laughing and hang up. You can go many ways with the game and if you slowly and progressively win their trust ask all kinds of strange questions.

Comment: Re:Given how most spend their time in college... (Score 0) 226

by Registered Coward v2 (#48405789) Attached to: Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

Not sure if that analogy works as it is more a practical vs. theoretical split.

Designing things isn't practical? Are you an arts graduate?

No, an engineer. I was referring to design being an exercise in theoretical knowledge while maintaining / repairing is more of a practical skill. It has nothing to do with weather the item designed is practical. Given how many engineers have designed cars to make them as hard a possible to repair (Remove the air filter to replace a headlight bulb? The trunk trim to replace a tail light? reallY?) "practical" may not be in their toolbox.

Comment: Re:Given how most spend their time in college... (Score 0) 226

by Registered Coward v2 (#48405359) Attached to: Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

It is as simple as programing as a vocation vs a profession.

More like cheap source of labor vs. more expensive one. Companies don't have to pay as much and get a ready supply to replace them as technologies change.

Think car mechanic vs engineer. One can fix an engine or even put it together the other designs it. Of course the best is when you have an engineer that is also a mechanic.

Not sure if that analogy works as it is more a practical vs. theoretical split. Perhaps more like quick change oil guy vs a mechanic. One can do one or two things cheaply and the other understand the underlying concepts and can actually troubleshoot and solve problems based on experience and training.

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 1) 91

by Registered Coward v2 (#48403777) Attached to: Facebook Planning Office Version To Rival LinkedIn, Google

Maybe some places don't care, but usually there's some kind of dollar cost to companies that do a lot of at-will terminations that result in unemployment compensation.

Yes, their premiums rise as claims increase, to a point. At that point, it is cheaper to layoff employees, let them collect unemployment, and then rehire them when demand picks back up since you've already maxed out your premiums. Seasonal employment is perfect for this, with employees getting a paid vacation through unemployment knowing they will be rehired when the season restarts. It's an economically rational approach to the problem of seasonal demand and low wage workers that works out well for both sides.

Comment: Re:The Fix: Buy good Chocolate! (Score 3, Insightful) 323

by Registered Coward v2 (#48398411) Attached to: MARS, Inc: We Are Running Out of Chocolate

So what to do? Buy good chocolate. A bar should be anywhere from $5-$15. You can't make really good chocolate without using great cocoa. You can't get great cocoa without paying a significant premium to the farmers -- often 2-4 times the NY or London terminal price. So you know they are paid well. You simply can't have a $1-2 chocolate bar after if has been run though the supply chain (stores, distributors, the factory, various cocoa brokers, etc.) and know the farmers were paid well no matter the certification.

Correct. The problem is not that there is a coach shortage but that there is a shortage of cheap cocoa. High end producers who want to make good chocolate pay a premium and get what they need. Mars, which doesn't really produce chocolate but a brown substance to cover filings, can't.

Comment: Re:In the uk (Score 1) 461

by Registered Coward v2 (#48347259) Attached to: Washington Dancers Sue To Prevent Identity Disclosure

In the US, FOIA requests can be denied on the basis of privacy violations (exemption 6), and law enforcement information (which this qualifies, I think) can be denied if its release could endanger the life or physical safety of any individual. http://www.foia.gov/faq.html#e...

Except that it is a state FOIA request; which may have the limits. The problem is most people are not sympathetic to strippers; and unlike gun owners who managed to get carry permit applications exempt, the lack a powerful lobby.

Comment: Re:Typical!! (Score 3, Insightful) 271

...Any such devices like this would be removed from any car I buy...

Agreed! But the key work here is 'buy' - the implication being you buy it outright, and are the owner.

On the other hand, if you are financing through the dealer, the RO (registered owner) is the dealer, not you.

Not quite true. The seller has a lean on the vehicle but you are the owner. If the dealer was still the legal one that could open them up for liability in the event of an accident, etc.

One possible reason that things aren't going according to plan is that there never was a plan in the first place.

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